Text Size

12-16-2011
December 16, 2011
ISS On-Orbit Status 12/16/11

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

After wakeup, FE-2 Ivanishin performed the routine inspection of the SM (Service Module) PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection.

FE-1 Shkaplerov terminated his 2nd experiment session, started last night, for the long-term Russian sleep study MBI-12/Sonokard, taking the recording device from his Sonokard sports shirt pocket and later copying the measurements to the RSE-Med laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

CDR Burbank the accumulated ICV Actiwatch Spectrum and HM2 data from his 2nd (FD30) 24-hr ICV (Integrated Cardiovascular) Ambulatory Monitoring session to the HRF PC1 (Human Research Facility Portable Computer 1), from two Actiwatch Spectrums and two HM2 HiFi CF Cards. The laptop was then powered off. [For the ICV Ambulatory Monitoring session, during the first 24 hrs (while all devices are worn), ten minutes of quiet, resting breathing are timelined to collect data for a specific analysis. The nominal exercise includes at least 10 minutes at a heart rate ≥120 bpm (beats per minute). After 24 hrs, the Cardiopres/BP is doffed and the HM2 HiFi CF Card and AA Battery are changed out to allow continuation of the session for another 24 hours, with the Makita batteries switched as required. After data collection is complete, the Actiwatches and both HM2 HiFi CF Cards are downloaded to the HRF PC1, while Cardiopres data are downloaded to the EPM (European Physiology Module) Rack and transferred to the HRF PC1 via a USB key for downlink.]

Later in the day, Burbank undertook his 2nd ICV Resting Echo Scan in the US Lab, operating the USND (ultrasound) scanning himself. [Wearing electrodes, ECG (Electrocardiograph) cable & VOX, Dan performed the USND scan for ICV assessment, with video being recorded from the HRF (Human Research Facility) Ultrasound and COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory) cabin camera. Heart rate was tracked with the HRM (Heart Rate Monitor). There are dietary constraints, and no exercise is allowed 4 hrs prior to scan. After confirmed file transfer, the gear was powered down and stowed. The USND echo experiment uses the Image Collector software on the laptop and requires VOX/Voice plus RT Video downlink during the activity. Goal of the ICV experiment is to quantify the extent, time course, and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy and identify its mechanisms. The ICV experiment consists of two separate but related activities over a one-week time period: an ultrasound echo scan & an ambulatory monitoring session. The sessions are scheduled at or around FD14, FD30, FD75, FD135 and R-15 (there are fewer sessions if mission duration is less than six months).]

FE-1 Shkaplerov powered off the Russian experiment KPT-10 “Kulonovskiy Kristall” (Coulomb Crystal) at the control & power unit, then tore down the hardware and stowed it in the MRM2 Poisk module, shooting documentary video for eventual return on Soyuz 28S.

Afterwards, Anton prepared the BTKh-43 KONSTANTA payload and executed experiment session #5 using Cassette #2-5, with documentary photography with the NIKON D2X and HVR-Z7E video camcorder and tagging up with ground specialist.[Objective: To identify if there is an effect of the space environment on the activity of a model enzyme relative to a specific substrate,- with two sessions.]

Starting at ~7:00am EST, the three crewmembers jointly worked their way through another periodic CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) Medical Contingency OBT (Onboard Training) drill, taking ~45 min. Part 1 of this OBT was conducted on 12/13. [This on-board training/drill gives crewmembers the opportunity to work as a team in resolving a simulated medical emergency onboard ISS. This training refreshes their memory of the on-orbit stowage and deployment locations, equipment use, and procedures. Objective is to practice crew communications & coordination necessary to perform medical emergency procedures using such equipment as the ACLS, ALSP (Advanced Life Support Pack) & AED (Automated External Defibrillator), performing hardware deployment & rescuer positioning, and conducting simulations of CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation), deployment & use of the CMRS (Crew Medical Restraint System), reviewing prevention of oxygen “bubble” build-up when using the RSP (Respiratory Support Pack), etc.]

Working on the SODI-COLLOID (Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Colloid) hardware in the MSG WV (Work Volume) in COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Dan supported ground-commanded operations by exchanging the DSC (Diffusion Soret Coefficient) Flash Disk from the Colloid Flash Disk Container. MSG was then put on Standby and its A31p laptop turned off. [More time than scheduled was required to move the PPFS (Portable Pulmonary Function System) away from the MSG to deploy the WV and later replace it. Colloid is part of the ESA triple experiment series of SODI (IVIDIL, DSC, Colloid) for advanced research in vibration effects on diffusion in liquids, diffusion measurements in petroleum reservoirs and the study on growth and properties of advanced photonic materials within colloidal solutions, respectively.]

Later, the CDR cleaned up and set up the S1 bay area in the US Lab in preparation for the move of the MWA (Maintenance Work Area) on 12/19 to support the long-planned EPIC (Enhanced Processor & Integrated Communications) software upgrade of 3 C&C MDMs (Command & Control Multiplexer/Demultiplexers) and 2 GNC (Guidance, Navigation & Control) MDMs (computers).

As part of today’s SOZh activities, Ivanishin worked in the DC1 Docking Compartment to start the regular urine transfer from EDV-U containers (879, 983, 997, 998) to the BV2 Rodnik water storage tank of Progress 45P (#413), docked at DC1, using the usual pumping equipment with the electric compressor (#41). The BV2 bladder was checked for leak-tightness on 12/9. Two more EDV-Us with US waste are standing by for transfer (935, 970, [Each of the spherical Rodnik tanks BV1 & BV2 consists of a hard shell with a soft membrane (bladder) composed of elastic fluoroplastic. The bladder is used to expel water from the tank by compressed air pumped into the tank volume surrounding the membrane and is leak-tested before urine transfers, i.e., with empty tanks, the bladders are expanded against the tank walls and checked for hermeticity.]

Working in the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment), Burbank performed the periodic changeout of the UR (urine receptacle) and IF (insert filter) with new units. [WHC was unavailable for use during this activity.]

Shkaplerov performed the periodic downloading of structural dynamics measurements of the IMU-Ts microaccelerometer of the running TEKh-22 “Identifikatsiya” (Identification) experiment in MRM1 (Mini Research Module 1) Rassvet to the RSE1 A31p laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground via OCA. [IMU-Ts is a part of the MRM1 SBI onboard measurement system, installed in PGO behind panel 104.]

Afterwards, FE-1 checked out two interior panels (327 & 130) in the SM to obtain initial data for fabricating cover sheets for the panels, clearing the panels of secured equipment and cargo items, marking locations for a cable hole and detachable handrail and assessing the feasibility of removing external panel elements. [The activities were supported by ground specialist tagup.]

Later, Anton collected & downloaded the periodic sensor readings of the Russian “Pille-MKS” (MKS = ISS) radiation dosimetry experiment which has 11 sensors placed at various locations in the RS (DC1, SM starboard & port cabin windows, ASU toilet facility, control panel, MRM2, MRM1, etc.) and four in CQs. The memory/flash card was then replaced. Today’s readings were taken manually from all 11 deployed dosimeters and logged on a data sheet. Automatic mode was then reactivated and the dosimeters left on the Pille Reader tray (until 12/28, when the activity will resume). [The dosimeters take their readings automatically every 90 minutes.]

Continuing the current round of periodic preventive maintenance of RS (Russian Segment) ventilation systems, Ivanishin worked in the DC1 to clean the VD1 & VD2 air ducts and in the FGB where he cleaned the ventilation grills of interior panels.

Anatoly also had another hour for more unloading and transfers of cargo from Progress 45P to the ISS for stowage, guided by an uplinked loading plan and logged in the IMS (Inventory Management System). [Of the approximately 1166 listed entries on 45P, about 404 are USOS items. Progress M-13M is to remain docked at the DC1 for about 3 months, and its unloading continues as a long-term activity.]

Working off the Russian “time permitting” discretionary task list, FE-1 took care of the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

FE-2 performed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO &KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (forElektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

Dan Burbank had another time slot reserved for making entries in his electronic Journal on his personal SSC (Station Support Computer). [Required are three journaling sessions per week.]

Before Presleep, the CDR will turn on the MPC (Multi Protocol Converter) and start the Ku-band data flow of video recorded during the day to the ground, with POIC (Payload Operations & Integration Center) routing the onboard HRDL (High-Rate Data Link). After about an hour, Dan will turn MPC routing off again. [This is a routine operation which regularly transmits HD onboard video (live or tape playback) to the ground on a daily basis before sleeptime.]

At ~3:00am EST, the three crewmembers held the regular (nominally weekly) tagup with the Russian Flight Control Team (GOGU/Glavnaya operativnaya gruppa upravleniya), including Shift Flight Director (SRP), at TsUP-Moscow via S-band/audio, phone-patched from Houston and Moscow.

At ~3:15am, Anton & Anatoly linked up with TsUP-Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

At ~2:25pm, the crew was scheduled for their regular weekly tagup with the Lead Flight Director at JSC/MCC-H.

The crew worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-1, FE-2), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (CDR, FE-1, FE-2), and T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR).

The Russian discretionary “time permitting” task list for FE-1 & FE-2 for today suggested more preparation & downlinking of reportages (written text, photos, videos) for the Roskosmos website to promote Russia’s manned space program (max. file size 500 Mb).

No CEO (Crew Earth Observation) target uplinked for today due to yesterday’s power outage at NASA JSC.

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 6:13am EST [= epoch])
· Mean altitude – 392.7 km
· Apogee height – 409.6 km
· Perigee height – 375.8 km
· Period -- 92.41 min.
· Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
· Eccentricity -- 0.0024987
· Solar Beta Angle -- 22.7 deg (magnitude decreasing)
· Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.58
· Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours -- 100 m
· Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) -- 74,936
· Time in orbit (station) -- 4774 days
· Time in orbit (crews, cum.) -- 4061 days

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/21/11 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit --- 8:16:15am EST (7:16:15pm Baikonur)
12/23/11 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S docking (MRM1) --- 10:23am EST
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
01/18/12 -- ISS Reboost (set up phasing for 46P)
01/24/12 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
01/25/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
01/27/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
02/07/12 -- Space-X Falcon 9/Dragon launch --- (target date)
02/10/12 -- Space-X Falcon 9/Dragon berthing --- (target date)
02/14/12 -- Russian EVA
02/23/12 -- Space-X Falcon 9/Dragon unberth --- (target date)
03/16/12-- Soyuz TMA-22/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Volkov --- (Target Date)
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S docking (MRM2) --- (Target Date)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
TBD -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – launch on Proton (under review)
04/24/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P undock
04/25/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P launch
04/27/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P docking
TBD -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) – docking (under review)
05/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
06/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/26/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/28/12 – Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/26/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/28/12 – Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/19/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/02/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch – P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
04/04/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/16/13 – Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch – M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/31/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch – M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch – K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------