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11-25-2011
November 25, 2011
ISS On-Orbit Status 11/25/11

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

After wakeup, FE-1 Shkaplerov performed the routine inspection of the SM (Service Module) PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection.

At wake-up, CDR Burbank completed his 3rd post-sleep session of the Reaction Self Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self Test on the ISS) protocol. [RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

Afterwards, Dan worked in the JAXA Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), exchanging the MMA (Microgravity Measurement Apparatus) power cable between the Kobairo and the Ryutai racks and labeling it appropriately.

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), the CDR later undertook his first ICV (Integrated Cardiovascular) Resting Echo Scan, followed by an ultrasound vessel imaging scans. [Wearing electrodes, ECG (Electrocardiograph) cable & VOX, Dan performed the ultrasound scan for the Resting Echo mode of ICV, with video being recorded from the HRF (Human Research Facility) Ultrasound and COL cabin camera. First, heart rate was tracked with the HRM (Heart Rate Monitor). After confirmed file transfer, the gear was powered down and stowed. Next, Burbank performed an ESA Vessel Imaging (Echography) scan in the COL on the EPM (European Physiology Module) laptop, using the Image Collector software, with VOX/Voice plus real-time video downlink during the activity. Goal of the ICV experiment is to quantify the extent, time course, and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy and identify its mechanisms. The ICV experiment consists of two separate but related activities over a one-week time period: an ultrasound echo scan & an ambulatory monitoring session.]

The CDR unpacked two CHeCS IMAKs (Crew Health Care Systems / ISS Medical Accessory Kits, #4037 & #4040), stowing his own personal medical items and resupply items and discarding or stowing the personal items for 27S crewmembers who have returned to Earth.

FE-1 Shkaplerov completed the daily routine servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

Working in the MRM1 Rassvet module, FE-2 Ivanishin removed and replaced the BS pump unit, containing electric pumps, of the SOTR GK (gydrokonture) fluid loop. [Before the IFM (Inflight Maintenance), MRM1 Loop 1 was swapped to Loop 2 by ground command; afterwards, and later the Thermal Control System (SOTR) was swapped back to using Loop 1.]

After preparing the BTKh-43 KONSTANTA payload, Shkaplerov executed experiment session #1, with Anatoly taking documentary photography. [Objective: To identify if there is an effect of the space environment on the activity of a model enzyme relative to a specific substrate,- with two sessions.]

Working from the Russian discretionary “time permitting” task list, Anton took care of the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Burbank conducted the weekly 10-min. CWC (Contingency Water Container) inventory as part of the on-going WRM (Water Recovery & Management) assessment of onboard water supplies. Updated “cue cards” based on the crew’s water calldowns are sent up every other week for recording changes. [The current card (29-0002F) lists 34 CWCs (517.6 L total) for the five types of water identified on board: 1. Silver technical water (7 CWCs with 217.5 L, for Elektron electrolysis, all containing Wautersia bacteria; 2. Condensate water (3 CWCs with 19.1 L), 7 empty bags; 3. Iodinated water (12 CWCs with 186.4 L; also 3 expired bags with 59.1 L); 4. Waste water (1 bag with 15.3 L EMU waste water); and 5. Special fluid (1 CWC with 20.2 L, hose/pump flush). Other CWCs are stowed behind racks and are currently not being tracked due to unchanging contents. Wautersia bacteria are typical water-borne microorganisms that have been seen previously in ISS water sources. These isolates pose no threat to human health.]

Dan also performed the periodic reboot of the SLT (System Laptop Terminal) laptop in the JAXA JPM (JEM Pressurized Module).

Using the two CSA-O2 (Compound Specific Analyzer-Oxygen) units #1043 & #1048, Burbank took standard oxygen partial pressure readings in the SM and COL.

Rather than troubleshooting the malfunctioning Sigma application on the Russian RSK1 laptop, Anton reloaded it with a fresh Sigma version from RSK2.

Afterwards, Anton conducted a test/familiarization session with the KPT-3 EKON payload for Russia's Environmental Safety Agency (EKON), making observations and taking aerial photography of environmental conditions of Earth using the Nikon D2X digital camera with the SIGMA 300-800mm telephoto lens.

The three crewmembers had about an hour of free time each for general orientation (adaptation, station familiarization & acclimatization) as is standard daily rule for fresh crewmembers for the first two weeks after starting residence, if they choose to take it.

Before Presleep, Dan will turn on the MPC (Multi Protocol Converter) and start the Ku-band data flow of video recorded during the day to the ground, with POIC (Payload Operations & Integration Center) routing the onboard HRDL (High-Rate Data Link). After about an hour, the CDR will turn MPC routing off again. [This is a routine operation which regularly transmits HD onboard video (live or tape playback) to the ground on a daily basis before sleeptime.]

At ~3:10am EST, the three crewmembers held the regular (nominally weekly) tagup with the Russian Flight Control Team (GOGU/Glavnaya operativnaya gruppa upravleniya), including Shift Flight Director (SRP), at TsUP-Moscow via S-band/audio, phone-patched from Houston and Moscow.

At ~3:25am, Anton & Anatoly linked up with TsUP-Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

At ~10:05am, the CDR conducted his regular IMS stowage conference with Houston stowage specialists.

At ~2:10pm, the crew is scheduled for their regular weekly tagup with the Lead Flight Director at JSC/MCC-H.

The crew worked out with their standard 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-1, FE-2), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR), and VELO ergometer bike with load trainer (FE-1, FE-2).

Russian Prop Transfer: TsUP/Moscow-controlled propellant transfers continued, today from the FGB K2 tank to the SM BO2 oxidizer tank at 2:26am-10:02pm EST. No crew involvement required.

No CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uplinked today.

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 5:00am EST [= epoch])
  • Mean altitude – 391.5 km
  • Apogee height – 412.4 km
  • Perigee height – 370.6 km
  • Period -- 92.39 min.
  • Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
  • Eccentricity -- 0.0030834
  • Solar Beta Angle -- -20.1 deg (magnitude decreasing)
  • Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.58
  • Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 194 m
  • Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) -- 74,608
  • Time in orbit (station) – 4753 days
  • Time in orbit (crews, cum.) – 4040 days

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11:30/11 -- ISS Reboost (SM main engine)
12/21/11 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/23/11 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
TBD -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
TBD -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
TBD -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
xx/xx/12 -- SpaceX Falcon 9/Dragon --- (Under Review)
02/29/12 -- ATV3 launch readiness
TBD -- Soyuz TMA-22/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Volkov --- (Target Date)
04/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S docking (MRM2) --- (Target Date)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/05/12 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – launch on Proton (under review)
05/06/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P undock
05/07/12 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) – docking (under review)
05/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-05M/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
10/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
10/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
12/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch – P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
03/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch – M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch – M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch – K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------