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December 30, 2010
ISS On-Orbit Status 12/30/10

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

FE-4 Dmitri Kondratyev conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [Dima will inspect the filters again before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

FE-5 Nespoli finished his controlled diet for his first (FD15) Pro K session. His diet menu was recorded on his diet log during the session (during the next run, FD30, he’s free to eat what he wants but must log it). [For Pro K, there are five in-flight sampling sessions scheduled (FD15, FD30, FD60, FD120, FD180), to be shared with the NUTRITION w/Repository protocol, each one with five days of diet & urine pH logging and photography on the last day. The crewmember prepares a diet log and then annotates quantities of food packets consumed and supplements taken. Urine collections are spread over 24 hrs; samples go into the MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS) within 30 min after collection. Blood samples, on the last day, are centrifuged in the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) and placed in MELFI at -80 degC. There is an 8-hr fasting requirement prior to the blood draw (i.e., no food or drink, but water ingestion is encouraged). MELFI constraints: Maximum MELFI dewar open time: 60 sec; at least 45 min between MELFI dewar door openings.]

Nespoli also concluded his first (FD15) NUTRITION w/Repository/Pro K 24-hr urine collection period, with samples deposited in MELFI. In addition, Paolo completed his first NUTRITION/Repository/Pro K generic blood collection, with CDR Kelly assisting with the phlebotomy as operator. FE-5 then set up the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) for spinning the samples prior to stowing them in the MELFI. [The operational products for blood & urine collections for the HRP (Human Research Program) payloads were revised some time ago, based on crew feedback, new cold stowage hardware, and IPV capabilities. Generic blood & urine procedures have been created to allow an individual crewmember to select their payload complement and see specific requirements populated. Individual crewmembers will select their specific parameter in the procedures to reflect their science complement. Different crewmembers will have different required tubes and hardware configurations, so they must verify their choice selection before continuing with operations to ensure their specific instruction.]

Before breakfast & first exercise, FE-1 Kaleri, FE-2 Skripochka & FE-4 Kondratyev took a full session with the Russian crew health monitoring program's medical assessment MO-9/Biochemical Urinalysis. Afterwards, Oleg closed out and stowed the Urolux hardware. [MO-9 is conducted every 30 days (and also before and after EVAs) and is one of five nominal Russian medical tests adopted by NASA for U.S. crewmembers for IMG PHS (Integrated Medical Group/Periodic Health Status) evaluation as part of the "PHS/Without Blood Labs" exam, also conducted today. The analysis uses the sophisticated in-vitro diagnostic apparatus Urolux developed originally by Boehringer (Mannheim/Germany) for the Mir program. Afterwards, the data are entered in the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer)’s special IFEP software (In-Flight Examination Program).]

CDR Kelly performed another status check on the MERLIN (Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator) Galley fridge, looking for any internal condensation moisture which would require replacing desiccants. [MERLIN, the Galley fridge, is used for cold storage of crew food and drink. If Cady found moisture, a change-out of the desiccant will be scheduled.]

In the Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), Kelly later checked out ICS (Inter-Orbit Communication System) equipment, connecting the headset and its adapt cable to the ICS Rack and making calls to SSIPC (Space Station Integration & Promotion Center/Tsukuba), MCC-H (Mission Control Center-Houston) and COL-CC (Columbus Control Center/Oberpfaffenhofen).

Later, Scott initiated another sampling run with the EHS GC/DMS (Environmental Health Systems Gas Chromatograph / Differential Mobility Spectrometer); deactivating the system ~5 hrs later. [This was the 6th session with the newly replaced GC/DMS unit #1004, after the previous instrument (#1002) was used for approximately 7 runs. Also known as AQM (Air Quality Monitor), the system is controlled with “Sionex” expert software from the SSC (Station Support Computer)-12 laptop (due to a software glitch, the software needs to be opened, closed, and then reopened in order to ensure good communication between GC/DMS and SSC-12). The AQM demonstrates COTS (Commercial Off-the-Shelf) technology for identifying volatile organic compounds, similar to the VOA (Volatile Organics Analyzer). This evaluation will continue over the course of several months as it helps to eventually certify the GC/DMS as nominal CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) hardware.]

Kaleri performed periodic service of the RS (Russian Segment) radiation payload suite “Matryoshka-R” (RBO-3-2), reading the recorded radiation traces of Bubble dosimeters, then initializing & re-deploying the detectors and verifying proper function of the setup with the LULIN-5 electronics box. [A total of eight Bubble dosimeter detectors were initialized in the Bubble dosimeter reader in the SM (Service Module) and positioned at new exposure locations. The deployment locations of the detectors were photo-documented with the NIKON D2X camera and also reported with initialization data to TsUP via log sheet via OCA. The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Note: Matryoshka is the name for the traditional Russian set of nested dolls],

Alex, Scott & Oleg spent three hours in “their” 24S Descent Module (#701) to conduct the Soyuz descent drill, a standard training exercise for every crew returning on this spacecraft. Results of the exercise, which strictly forbids any command activation (except for switching the InPU display on the Neptun-ME console), were subsequently reported to ground control at TsUP/Moscow. [The session includes a review of the pertinent ODFs (operational data files), specifically the books on Soyuz Ascent & Descent Procedures, Emergency Descents, and Off-Nominal Situations, crew responsibilities when executing the flight program, visual crew recognition of SUS (Entry Control System) failures, spacesuit procedures, etc., with special emphasis on operations with the Neptune-ME cockpit console. The training uses a Descent Simulator application (Trenasher Spusk =”descent trainer”) on the RSK1 laptop.]

FE-6 Coleman performed her first ICV (Integrated Cardiovascular) Resting Echo Scan as subject, assisted by Nespoli as CMO, helping to operate the ultrasound scans. [Wearing electrodes, ECG (Electrocardiograph) cable & VOX, Cady underwent the ultrasound scan for the Resting Echo mode of ICV, with video being recorded from the HRF (Human Research Facility) Ultrasound and COL cabin camera. First, heart rate was tracked with the HRM (Heart Rate Monitor). After confirmed file transfer, the gear was powered down and stowed. Next, Cady performed an ESA Vessel Imaging (Echography) scan in the COL on the EPM (European Physiology Module) laptop, using the Image Collector software, with VOX/Voice plus real-time video downlink during the activity. Goal of the ICV experiment is to quantify the extent, time course, and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy and identify its mechanisms. The ICV experiment consists of two separate but related activities over a one-week time period: an ultrasound echo scan & an ambulatory monitoring session. The sessions are scheduled at or around FD14, FD30, FD75, FD135 and R-15 (there are fewer sessions if mission duration is less than six months).]

Also in COL, Paolo Nespoli worked on the ESA BLB (Biolab), supporting ground-commanded periodic tests of the ATCS (Automatic Temperature Controlled Stowage) areas 1 & 2 by removing thermal mass inserts for temperature checks.

Dmitri Kondratyev set up the Russian DZZ-12 RUSALKA (“Mermaid”) hardware at SM window #9 for another sun-glint observation session, using the hand-held spectrometer (without use of the TIUS three-stage rate sensor), synchronized with the coaxially mounted NIKON D2X camera for taking snapshots, and later downloaded the data to laptop RS1 for subsequent downlink via OCA. The equipment was then torn down and stowed away. [RUSALKA is a micro spectrometer for collecting detailed information on observed spectral radiance in the near IR (Infrared) waveband for measurement of greenhouse gas concentrations in the Earth atmosphere.]

Later, Dima conducted periodic maintenance tests of the VShTV Wide-Angle Vertical Sighting Device on the television screen showing Earth terrain. Screen shots using the NIKON D2X digital camera with f17-55 mm lens were then downlinked to the ground via OCA, showing the terminator area and Earth sunset region (before Sun moved under horizon) to obtain image of Sun to evaluate light transmission of the device.. [Purpose of the annual routine VShTV maintenance tests is to verify proper operation and optical quality of the device after being exposed to spaceflight conditions over a long period.]

FE-4 also did the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Sasha Kaleri took care of the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

CDR Kelly completed another weekly 10-min. CWC (Contingency Water Container) inventory as part of the on-going WRM (Water Recovery & Management) assessment of onboard water supplies. Updated “cue cards” based on the crew’s water calldowns are sent up every other week for recording changes. [The current card (26-0045A) lists 123 CWCs (2,672.0 L total) for the five types of water identified on board: 1. technical water (27 CWCs with 1106.8 L, for Elektron electrolysis, incl. 649.5 L in 16 bags containing Wautersia bacteria, 134.2 L in 3 clean bags for contingency use, 300.1 L in 7 bags for flushing only with microbial filter, and 23.0 L in 1 bag for flushing only; 2. potable water (no CWCs); 3. iodinated water (85 CWCs with 1,538.7 L for reserve; 4. condensate water (6.3 L in 1 bag to be used only for OGA, plus 7 empty bags); and 5. waste/EMU dump and other (20.2 L in 1 CWC from hose/pump flush & 1 empty bag). Wautersia bacteria are typical water-borne microorganisms that have been seen previously in ISS water sources. These isolates pose no threat to human health.]

FE-6 performed the periodic manual filling of the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment) EDV-SV flush water tank in Node-3 (which took about 26 min). [As always, WHC was unavailable during this time.]

Coleman then configured the WHC for using the internal EDV-U container, and reported the flush counter.

Later, Cady offloaded the water contents of two CWCs-I (CWCs-Iodine, #2009 & #2011) to the WPA (Water Processor Assembly) via the usual Tee hose.

In the Node-3 Cupola, Scott reloaded the RWS PCS (Robotic Workstation / Portable Computer System) laptop with new software from a DVD from the CD Library.

In the Kibo JPM, Scott Kelly supported the BCAT-5 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5) payload by fixing/focusing the automated D2Xs camera on a new sample (#10) and resetting the Intervalometer of the camera to 60 min (number of intervals: 336). [The checkup includes image transfer, camera battery and camera/flash position. It is scheduled daily starting at Initiation+1 day during automated photography. Pictures will now be taken automatically of Sample 10 for the next 14 days.]

Oleg & Alex had another 1h each for stowing discarded cargo in Progress M-08M/40P, scheduled for undocking on 1/24.

Dmitri & Oleg joined up for another 2h period of preparations for the next Russian spacewalk, EVA-27, on 1/21. [Activities today were focused on Orlan spacesuit replaceable elements, service, and personal gear, supported by ground specialist tagup via S-band.]

Scott Kelly continued to provide Inc-26 crew handover information to Paolo and Cady, today for about 1hr.

Dmitri, Nespoli & Coleman again had their free time for general orientation (adaptation, station familiarization & acclimatization) as is standard daily rule for fresh crewmembers for the first two weeks after starting residence, if they choose to take it.

Paolo filled out his weekly FFQ (Food Frequency Questionnaire) on the MEC. [On the FFQs, NASA astronauts keep a personalized log of their nutritional intake over time on special MEC software. Recorded are the amounts consumed during the past week of such food items as beverages, cereals, grains, eggs, breads, snacks, sweets, fruit, beans, soup, vegetables, dairy, fish, meat, chicken, sauces & spreads, and vitamins. The FFQ is performed once a week to estimate nutrient intake from the previous week and to give recommendations to ground specialists that help maintain optimal crew health. Weekly estimation has been verified to be reliable enough that nutrients do not need to be tracked daily.]

At ~2:50am EST, the crew held the regular (nominally weekly) tagup with the Russian Flight Control Team (GOGU), including Shift Flight Director (SRP), at TsUP via S-band/audio, phone-patched from Houston and Moscow.

At ~4:05am, Nespoli conducted a tagup with the ESA staff at Col-CC at Oberpfaffenhofen/Germany. [This conference is scheduled once every week, between ISS crewmembers and Col-CC via S/G2 (Space-to-Ground 2) audio.]

At ~5:15am, the three Russian Flight Engineers held an RS PAO TV conference with RSC Energia management, exchanging New Year greetings via Ku+S-band.

At ~7:45am, Sasha & Dima linked up with TsUP/Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

At ~10:15am, CDR Kelly and Flight Engineers Cady Coleman & Paolo Nespoli supported a PAO TV event with two clients,- The Recorder (Greenfield, MA, Anita Phillips), and MSNBC (Richard Lui). [Greenfield, MA is Cady’s hometown.]

At ~12:45pm, Scott had his regular IMS stowage conference with Houston stowage specialists.

At ~2:10pm, the six crewmembers were scheduled for their regular weekly tagup with the Lead Flight Director or ISS at JSC/MCC-Houston.

The crewmembers worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (CDR, FE-5, FE-6), TVIS treadmill (FE-1, FE-2, FE-4), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (CDR, FE-2, FE-5, FE-6) and VELO ergometer bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1, FE-2).

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uploaded today were Germany at night (looking left for the Hamburg–Berlin region of northern Germany), Pakistan-India at night (looking left for good oblique opportunity of the Karachi region of southern Pakistan. Then looking left for the major Mumbai region of western India. Looking south down the coast for smaller coastal cities), and East Coast snow cover (Dynamic event. Looking left for low-sun opportunities [sun elevation 17 degrees and less] of news-making regional snow cover. Recent ISS/CEO terminator images of the East Coast captured snow cover in marginal lighting conditions).

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 5:29am EST [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 352.3 km
Apogee height – 356.0 km
Perigee height – 348.6 km
Period -- 91.59 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.65 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0005434
Solar Beta Angle -- 4.0 deg (magnitude decreasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.72
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 112 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 69,434.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
01/13/11 -- ISS Reboost Pt. 2
01/20/11 -- HTV2 launch
01/21/11 -- Russian EVA-27
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/27/11 -- HTV2 berthing (Node-2 zenith)
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking (DC1)
02/03/11 -- STS-133/Discovery launch – 1:37:36 am EST
02/04/11 -- STS-133/Discovery docking – ~9:43pm
02/11/11 -- STS-133/Discovery undock – 4:42pm
02/13/11 -- STS-133/Discovery land (KSC) – ~8:41pm
02/21/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch
02/19/11 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
02/24/11 -- HTV2 unberthing (Node-2 nadir)
02/26/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” docking (SM aft)
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch – A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/01/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) launch – ~3:15am --- NET
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking (DC1)
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/04/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------

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