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December 22, 2010
ISS On-Orbit Status 12/22/10

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

FE-4 Dmitri Kondratyev conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [Dima will inspect the filters again before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

At wake-up, FE-2 Oleg Skripochka terminated his 7th experiment session, started last night, for the long-term Russian sleep study MBI-12/Sonokard, taking the recording device from his Sonokard sports shirt pocket and later copying the measurements to the RSE-Med laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

Also at wake-up, CDR Scott Kelly completed his last but one post-sleep shift session of the Reaction Self Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self Test on the ISS) protocol. [RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

FE-5 Paolo Nespoli conducted Part 2 of the periodic personal acoustic measurement protocol, today taking the three crew-worn dosimeters (#1011, #1012, #1013) from the crew and deploying them for static measurements on the SM CP (Service Module Central Post), in Node-2 (at S3) and in the Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module).

The crew conducted the periodic pre-breakfast session of the Russian biomedical routine assessment PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement, using the IM mass measurement device set up by Kaleri who later stowed it away again. In addition to MO-8, the three Russian crewmembers, Oleg, Sasha & Dima, also completed the PZEh-MO-7/Calf Volume Measurement protocol. [For determining body mass in zero-G, where things are weightless but not massless, the Russian IM "scales" for MO-8 measure the inertial forces that arise during the oscillatory motion of a mass driven by two helical metering springs with known spring constants. By measuring the time period of each oscillation of the unknown mass (the crewmember) and comparing it to the period of a known mass, the crewmember’s mass is calculated by the computer and displayed. MO-7 Calf measurements (left leg only) are taken with the IZOG device, a custom-sewn fabric cuff that fits over the calf, using the knee and lower foot as fixed reference pints, to provide a rough index of deconditioning in zero-G and effectiveness of countermeasures. ]

It was FE-1 Alex Kaleri’s turn today with the Russian biomedical MBI-15 "Pilot-M"/NEURO signal response experiment, set up yesterday by Skripochka who assisted in the 3h 30m session. Later, the Pilot-M & Neurolab-2000M gear was disassembled & stowed away, data files were downloaded, and Alex reported to TsUP-Moscow on his run. [MBI-15 requires the Multipurpose Hardware Bench as a table, ankle restraint system, eyeball electrodes for an EOG (electrooculogram), and two hand controllers (RUO & RUD) for testing piloting skill in “flying” simulations on a laptop (RSK1) with software (v. 2.0) under stopwatch control, as well as for studying special features of the psychophysiologic response of cosmonauts to the effects of stress factors in flight.]

Kondratyev concluded his first session of the standard 24-hour ECG (electrocardiogram) recording under the Russian MedOps PZE MO-2 protocol, started yesterday. [After the ECG recording and blood pressure measurements with the Kardiomed system, Dmitri doffed the five-electrode Holter harness that read his dynamic (in motion) heart function from two leads over the past 24 hours, recording data on the “Kardioregistrator 90205” unit. The examination results were then downloaded from the Holter ECG device to the RSE-Med laptop, controlled by the Kardiomed application. Later, the data were downlinked as a compressed .zip-file via OCA.]

In the JAXA Kibo laboratory, FE-6 Coleman pulled out the CB (Clean Bench) for the periodic cleaning of its disinfection and operation chambers, then checked out the function of the relief valve.

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Nespoli wrapped up his first session with the ESA experiment NeuroSpat (Study of Spatial Cognition, Novelty Processing and Sensorimotor Integration), saving a complete set of the science data on the hard disks of the EPM MEEMM (European Physiology Module / Multi-Electrode Electroencephalogram Measurement Module) and the MPL (Multipurpose Laptop). After the data transfer, Paolo disassembled and stowed the equipment. [MEEMM is a subsection of the EPM facility, to be used for different types of non-invasive brain function investigations. It can also easily be reconfigured to support research in the field of muscle physiology. NeuroSpat, the first experiment that used the EPM, investigates the ways in which crew members’ three-dimensional visual & space perception is affected by long-duration stays in weightlessness.]

Afterwards, FE-5 closed the protective shutters of the Lab, Kibo & Cupola windows to prevent thruster plume contamination from the ISS reboost at 10:15am EST.

Kondratyev replaced books and updated procedures pages of RODF (Russian Operations Data File) documents brought up on Soyuz 24S (#701) and Soyuz 25S (#230). [Changes involve 8 different subjects, including the books on Medical Experiments (ME), Technical Experiments (TE), Medical Operations (MO), ATV Operations, ATV Command & Control, E24/25 Handover Recommendations (RPS MKS), RS EVA-27 from DC1, Ascent/Descent (V/S) for Soyuz 24S, and a CD-ROM with ODFs.]

Scott worked in the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment), reconfiguring it to feed the UPA (Urine Processor Assembly) for processing, instead of an EDV-U container.

Observed by Dmitri for his familiarization, Oleg completed the periodic transfer of condensate water to an RS EDV container for the periodic (about twice a month) replenishing of the Elektron’s water supply for electrolysis into oxygen & hydrogen, filling the designated KOV (condensate water) EDV container from a CWC (Contingency Water Container, #1050). When filled, the EDV was connected to the BPK transfer pump for processing through the BKO water purification (multifiltration) unit. [The ~40-minute procedure is specially designed to prevent air bubbles larger than ~10 mm from getting into the Elektron’s BZh Liquid Unit where they could cause Elektron shutdown. If bubbles are detected in the EDV, they are separated (by centrifugation) into another EDV. BKO contains five purification columns to rid the condensate of dissolved mineral and organic impurities. It has a service lifetime of ~450 liters throughput. The water needs to be purified for proper electrolysis in the Elektron O2 generator.]

Afterwards, Skripochka activated & verified proper operation of the Russian TEKh-15/DAKON-M IZGIB (“Bend”) experiment in the SM for taking structural dynamics data during the ISS reboost at 10:15am. The data were later copied to a USB stick, the archive cleared, and the data downlinked to the ground. [IZGIB has the objective to help update mathematical models of the ISS gravitation environment, using accelerometers of the Russian SBI Onboard Measurement System, the GIVUS high-accuracy angular rate vector gyrometer of the SUDN Motion Control & Navigation System and other accelerometers for unattended measurement of micro-accelerations at science hardware accommodation locations - (1) in operation of onboard equipment having rotating parts (gyrodynes, fans), (2) when establishing and keeping various ISS attitude modes, and (3) when performing crew egresses into space and physical exercises.]

Led by CDR Kelly, the 25S crew of FE-4 Kondratyev, FE-5 Nespoli & FE-6 Coleman performed the regular 2h15m Emergency Egress Readiness Drill for Increment 26, followed by a discussion with the ground. [This is a standard training exercise conducted to familiarize new crewmembers with the location of emergency equipment (including hatches & passageways), focusing particularly on the passage along the emergency evacuation route. It includes checking out the position of valves used in emergencies, an inspection of each hatch for drag-throughs and an audit of all cable cutters and flashlights at the hatches, plus a review of crew interactions in emergencies.]

Scott Kelly & Oleg Skripochka completed the regular monthly session of the CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) emergency medical operations OBT (On-Board Training) drill, a 30-min. exercise to refresh their CMO (Crew Medical Officer) acuity in a number of critical health areas. The video-based proficiency drill today focused on intravenous (IV) fluid infusion for both of them. [The HMS (Health Maintenance Systems) hardware, including ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) equipment, may be used in contingency situations where crew life is at risk. To maintain proficiency, crewmembers spend one hour per month reviewing HMS and ACLS equipment and procedures via the HMS and ACLS CBT (computer-based training). The training drill, each crewmember for him/herself, refreshes their memory of the on-orbit stowage and deployment locations, equipment etc. and procedures.]

FE-1 completed the regular inspection of the replaceable half-coupling of the 4GB4 hydraulic unit of the KOB-2 (Loop 2) of the Russian SOTR Thermal Control System, checking for coolant fluid hermeticity (leak-tightness).

Kaleri also conducted the periodic inspection of the SRV-K2M Condensate Water Processor’s sediment trap insert (VU) in the SM. [The Russian SRVK-2M converts collected condensate into drinking water and dispenses the reclaimed potable water.]

Afterwards, Alex performed the periodic switch of the two Russian Regul/Paket email (radiogram) channels, today from backup Regul-OC String 2 to String 1.

In the Node-3 Cupola, Paolo Nespoli reloaded the RWS PCS (Robotic Workstation / Portable Computer System) laptop with new software from a DVD from the CD Library in an effort to eliminate a software error seen a few weeks ago. [After Paolo had reloaded the PCS via a CD, MCC-Houston uploaded two corrective patches.]

Scott conducted the periodic (~weekly) inspection & maintenance, as required, of the CGBA-4 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 4) and CGBA-5 payloads in their ERs (EXPRESS Racks). [For the upcoming Christmas holiday, the CGBA ground team has disabled the DTN (Delay Tolerant Network) commanding to avoid accumulating a large backlog of commands across the POIC (Payload Operation & Integration Center) next Saturday. DTN software transmits messages between ISS and Mission Control Centers, and most of its operations run from the ground. The DTN software sends CGBA-5 payload data to the ground, and automatic acknowledgement messages are generated by the ground to be passed back to the payload.]

The CDR also performed the periodic camera setup status check on the running BCAT-5 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5) with Sample 2, without SSC (Station Support Computer). [The checkup includes image transfer, camera battery and camera/flash position. It is scheduled daily starting at Initiation+1 day during automated photography.]

Kaleri performed periodic service of the RS (Russian Segment) radiation payload suite “Matryoshka-R” (RBO-3-2), reading the recorded radiation traces of Bubble dosimeters, then initializing & re-deploying the detectors and verifying proper function of the setup with the LULIN-5 electronics box. [A total of five Bubble dosimeter detectors were initialized in the Bubble dosimeter reader in the SM and positioned at new exposure locations. The deployment locations of the detectors were photo-documented with the NIKON D2X camera and also reported with initialization data to TsUP via log sheet via OCA. The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Note: Matryoshka is the name for the traditional Russian set of nested dolls],

Skripochka manually recorded the periodic sensor readings of the Russian “Pille-MKS” (MKS = ISS) radiation dosimetry experiment’s 11 sensors currently on the Pille Reader tray, and then deployed them at various locations in the RS (DC1, SM starboard & port cabin windows, ASU toilet facility, control panel, MRM1, MRM2, etc.) [The dosimeters take their readings automatically every 90 minutes.]

Continuing work on the BSPN Payload Server in SM, which had received new software yesterday to upgrade the BSPN’s HDD (Hard Disk Drive) backup partitions, Alex Kaleri today performed a log file dump for review on the ground, then tagged up with ground specialists via S-Band.

Oleg completed his 5th data collection for the psychological MBI-16 Vzaimodejstvie (“Interactions”) program, accessing and completing the computerized study questionnaire on the RSE-Med laptop and saving the data in an encrypted file. [The software has a “mood” questionnaire, a “group & work environment” questionnaire, and a “critical incidents” log. Results from the study, which is also mirrored by ground control subjects, could help to improve the ability of future crewmembers to interact safely and effectively with each other and with Mission Control, to have a more positive experience in space during multi-cultural, long-duration missions, and to successfully accomplish mission activities.]

Oleg completed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

Dima did the daily IMS maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Exp-26 newcomers Coleman, Nespoli & Kondratyev again had their free time for general orientation (adaptation, station familiarization & acclimatization) as is standard daily rule for fresh crewmembers for the first two weeks after starting residence, if they choose to take it.

Coleman & Nespoli observed Scott Kelly in his 90-min ARED advanced resistive exerciser workout to familiarize themselves with its use. [New crewmembers always receive training from experienced crew on the use of the exercise equipment - one session for each apparatus.]

Afterwards, Paolo serviced the ARED (Advanced Resistive Exercise Device) by checking out the rails & rollers and greasing the VIS (Vibration Isolation System) Y- & Z-axes rails & rollers and upper stops.

Cady completed the monthly maintenance of the T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill, checking its components, pin alignment, rack centering and the snubber jam nut witness marks. [Witness marks (12 total) are applied to the X-, Y- & Z-axis jam nuts on each (of four) snubber arm; their inspection serves to determine to what degree and which jam nuts are backing off.]

Oleg Skripochka set up the video equipment to capture his workout session on the TVIS treadmill for subsequent biomechanical evaluation of the crewmember and hardware status at MCC-H.

The crewmembers worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (FE-5, FE-6), TVIS treadmill (FE-1, FE-2, FE-4), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (CDR, FE-2, FE-5, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR), and VELO ergometer bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1, FE-4). It was the first exercise sessions for Cady & Paolo.

At ~6:40am EST, Paolo Nespoli had his weekly PFC (Private Family Conference) via S-band/audio and Ku-band/MS-NetMeeting application (which displays the uplinked ground video on an SSC laptop).

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uploaded today, besides Aurora Borealis opportunities, were Mt. Toondina Impact Crater, S. Australia (looking to the right of track for this 4-km diameter impact crater. The crater is located to the NW of Lake Eyre, and is expressed on the land surface as a raised elliptical structure. Oblique imagery of the crater will be useful for locating other high resolution imagery), and N. Glaciers of S. Patagonian Glaciers Field (some scattered clouds may have been present at the time of this nadir-viewing overpass of these glaciers. There are several glaciers of interest in this part of the Icefield – the ground recommended overlapping, nadir-viewing mapping frames taken along track as the most efficient technique for photography.)

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
01/20/11 -- HTV2 launch
01/21/11 -- Russian EVA-27
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/27/11 -- HTV2 berthing (Node-2 zenith)
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking (DC1)
02/03/11 -- STS-133/Discovery launch – 1:37:36 am EST
02/04/11 -- STS-133/Discovery docking – ~9:43pm
02/11/11 -- STS-133/Discovery undock – 4:42pm
02/13/11 -- STS-133/Discovery land (KSC) – ~8:41pm
02/21/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch
02/19/11 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
02/24/11 -- HTV2 unberthing (Node-2 nadir)
02/26/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” docking (SM aft)
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch – A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/01/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) launch – ~3:15am --- NET
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking (DC1)
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/04/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------

To send holiday greetings to the crew and get more information about the space station, visit http://www.nasa.gov/station