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December 02, 2010
ISS On-Orbit Status 12/02/10

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

After wakeup, FE-2 Skripochka conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator. [The filters were installed by Maxim Suraev on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). Oleg will again inspect the filters before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

In the US Lab, CDR Kelly serviced the VCAM (Vehicle Cabin Atmosphere Monitor) by closing He (helium) valve #2, then shutting the access door again and re-attaching the acoustic blanket. [The JPL-developed VCAM identifies gases that are present in minute quantities in the ISS breathing air that could be harmful to crew health. If successful, instruments like VCAM could accompany crewmembers during long-duration exploration missions. Similar to the earlier employed VOA (Volatile Organic Analyzer), VCAM can provide a means for monitoring the air within enclosed environments, using a miniature preconcentrator, GC (gas chromatograph), and mass spectrometer for unbiased detection of a large number of organic species. VCAM's software can identify whether the chemicals are on a targeted list of hazardous compounds and their concentration. A VCAM calibration gas is used periodically to check how the instrument’s components are actually performing. The raw data, calibration data, and analysis results are all sent to the ground for further assessment to validate the instrument’s detection, identification, and quantification results.]

After yesterday’s THC IMV (Temperature & Humidity Control / Intermodule Ventilation) fan and filter cleaning in the Lab, Kelly today conducted air flow measurements with the electronic Velocicalc instrument in Lab, Node-1, Node-3 and Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module). [Lab measurements were conducted at the D6-03, D1-03 & O1-01 diffusers, in Node-1 at the O2-35 diffuser, Node-3 at the AO3 & AO4 diffusers, and in JPM at the Ovhd Aft inlet and Stbd Aft inlet & Fwd outlet.]

Later, after conferring with SPHERES PD (Payload Developer) Jacob Katz at ~3:15am EST, Scott had ~2h30m reserved for taking SSC-5 (Station Support Computer 5) with the SPHERES GUI (Graphic User Interface) application from the Lab to the JPM, setting up the equipment, cameras & beacons in the Kibo work areas and conducting another test run of the SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) experiment. With dimmed GLAs (General Luminaire Assemblies), the satellite(s) were programmed & deployed and then commanded through their tests from the SSC-5 laptop. [SPHERES was originally developed to demonstrate the basics of formation flight and autonomous docking, using beacons as reference for the satellites, to fly formation with or dock to the beacon. A number of programs define various incremental tests including attitude control (performing a series of rotations), attitude-only tracking, attitude and range tracking, docking with handheld and mounted beacons, etc. The payload consists of up to three self-contained 8-inch dia. free-floating satellites which perform the various algorithms (control sequences), commanded and observed by the crew members which provide feedback to shape algorithm development. Each satellite has 12 thrusters and a tank with CO2 for propellant. The first tests, in May 2006, used only one satellite (plus two beacons – one mounted and one hand-held); a second satellite arrived on ULF1.1, the third on 12A.1. Formation flight and autonomous docking are important enabling technologies for distributed architectures.]

In the SM (Service Module), FE-1 Kaleri & FE-2 Skripochka meanwhile conducted Day 3 of installation, connection & outfitting of the new RSPI Radio System for Information Transfer. [In Part 3 of the task, the two flight engineers installed additional wiring & cable hookups with the SBI Onboard Measurement System. More to come tomorrow: connecting BITS2-12 onboard telemetry measurement system to the new instruments and replacing a ROM (read-only memory) unit. RSPI will enable the RS (Russian Segment) to downlink large data files using Russian communication assets, similar to the USOS OCA (Orbiter Communication Adapter) system. The external RSPI antenna will be mounted on the SM exterior during the Orlan EVA-27, currently scheduled on 1/21.]

Skripochka & Kelly completed the regular monthly session of the CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) emergency medical operations OBT (On-Board Training) drill, a 30-min. exercise to refresh his CMO (Crew Medical Officer) acuity in a number of critical health areas (Oleg’s 2nd, Scott’s first). The video-based proficiency drill today focused on Nosebleed for both of them. [The HMS (Health Maintenance Systems) hardware, including ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) equipment, may be used in contingency situations where crew life is at risk. To maintain proficiency, crewmembers spend one hour per month reviewing HMS and ACLS equipment and procedures via the HMS and ACLS CBT (computer-based training). The training drill, each crewmember for him/herself, refreshes their memory of the on-orbit stowage and deployment locations, equipment etc. and procedures.]

The CDR performed another weekly 10-min. CWC (Contingency Water Container) inventory as part of the on-going WRM (Water Recovery & Management) assessment of onboard water supplies. Updated “cue cards” based on the crew’s water calldowns are sent up every other week for recording changes. [Today’s current card (25-0001D) lists 124 CWCs (2,735.2L total) for the five types of water identified on board: 1. technical water (28 CWCs with 1170.0 L, for Elektron electrolysis, incl. 712.7 L in 17 bags containing Wautersia bacteria, 134.2 L in 3 clean bags for contingency use, 300.1 L in 7 bags for flushing only with microbial filter, and 23.0 L in 1 bag for flushing only; 2. potable water (no CWCs); 3. iodinated water (85 CWCs with 1,538.7 L for reserve; 4. condensate water (6.3 L in 1 bag to be used only for OGA, plus 7 empty bags); and 5. waste/EMU dump and other (20.2 L in 1 CWC from hose/pump flush & 1 empty bag). Wautersia bacteria are typical water-borne microorganisms that have been seen previously in ISS water sources. These isolates pose no threat to human health.]

Kelly also had about an hour for searching for (and restowing) an unused JLP (JEM Logistics Pressurized Segment) vestibule jumper for possible use during HTV2 (H-II Transfer Vehicle 2) docked ops (if HTV2 links up at the Node-2 Zenith port).

Scott later built a spare EDV container from a bucket and a lid, then stowed it for future use in the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment).

Alex Kaleri completed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

The crew worked out on today’s 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-1, FE-2), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR, FE-2), and T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR), and VELO bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1). [T2 snubber arm inspection is no longer needed after every T2 session but must be done after the last T2 session of the day.]

MT Translation Deferral: Yesterday’s scheduled MT (Mobile Transporter) move to support SPDM (Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator) ops next week has been postponed since current onboard crew and hardware do not support an EVA capability in the event of an anomaly during MT translations. Such an anomaly could leave the vehicle unable to support the upcoming Soyuz 25S docking. The translation was rescheduled to post-25S docking when EVA capability will be available.

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uploaded today were Beirut, Lebanon (looking right of track on the coast for images of this capital city), Shebelle River fan, Somalia (nadir pass over this complex of Somali “inland deltas” [large alluvial fans]. The interest of these fans is that they host major aquifers. Many African rivers have generated very large fans [much larger than the well-known alluvial fan of the western USA] where they exit from highland zones. The Shebelle and two other rivers have generated three inland deltas that meet under track. They have produced a complex surface pattern of channels and swamps. The Shebelle River and its neighbors are undergoing renewed research into their subsurface structure. Images showing these features at different times of year will assist hydrologists on the ground since vegetation patterns can indicate subsurface water flow patterns), and Northern Isle of France, Mauritius (looking just right of track. Darwin landed here on his voyage west across the Indian Ocean near modern Port Louis).

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 8:25am EST [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 350.9 km
Apogee height – 356.0 km
Perigee height – 345.9 km
Period -- 91.56 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.65 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.000748
Solar Beta Angle -- -28.4 deg (magnitude decreasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.73
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 110 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 68,995.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/15/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S launch – Kondratyev (CDR-27)/Coleman/Nespoli (2:09pm)
12/17/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S docking (MRM1) (~3:27pm)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/17/10 -- STS-133/Discovery launch – ~8:52pm --- NET (not earlier than)
12/19/10 -- STS-133/Discovery docking
12/26/10 -- STS-133/Discovery undock
12/28/10 -- STS-133/Discovery landing (KSC)
01/20/11 -- HTV2 launch
01/21/11 -- Russian EVA-27
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/27/11 -- HTV2 berthing (Node-2 nadir)
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking (DC1)
02/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch
02/19/11 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
02/24/11 -- HTV2 unberthing (Node-2 nadir)
02/26/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” docking (SM aft)
02/27/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) launch
03/01/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) docking
03/11/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) undock
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch – A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking (DC1)
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/04/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------

To send holiday greetings to the crew and get more information about the space station, visit http://www.nasa.gov/station.