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11-23-2010
November 23, 2010
ISS On-Orbit Status 11/23/10

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below

At day’s begin, FE-1 Kaleri conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [Alex will again inspect the filters before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

CDR Wheelock, FE-6 Walker & FE-3 Kelly continued their current week-long activity with the post-wakeup experiment SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight), 8th for Wheels & Shannon, 3rd for Scott, transferring data from their Actiwatches to the HRF-1 (Human Research Facility 1) laptop. [To monitor their sleep/wake patterns and light exposure during a SLEEP session, crewmembers wear a special Actiwatch device which measures the light levels encountered by him/her as well as their patterns of sleep and activity throughout the Expedition, using the payload software for data logging and filling in questionnaire entries in the experiment’s laptop session file on the HRF-1 laptop. The log entries are done within 15 minutes of final awakening for seven consecutive days.]

First thing in post-sleep, Walker & Wheelock had Day 3 of their 2nd liquid saliva collection of the INTEGRATED IMMUNE protocol, prior to eating, drinking, and brushing teeth. The collections are made every other day for six days. [INTEGRATED IMMUNE (Validating Procedures for Monitoring Crew member Immune Function) samples & analyzes participant’s blood, urine, and saliva before, during and after flight for changes related to functions like bone metabolism, oxidative damage and immune function to develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. The strategy uses both long and short duration crewmembers as study subjects. The saliva is collected in two forms, dry and liquid. The dry samples are collected at intervals during the collection day using a specialized book that contains filter paper. The liquid saliva collections require that the crewmembers soak a piece of cotton inside their mouths and place it in a salivette bag; there are four of the liquid collections during docked operations. The on-orbit blood samples are collected right before undocking and returned to the ground so that analysis can occur with 48 hours of the sampling. This allows assays that quantify the function of different types of white blood cells and other active components of the immune system. Samples are secured in the MELFI (Minus-Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS). Also included are entries in a fluid/medications intact log, and a stress-test questionnaire to be filled out by the subject at begin and end. Urine is collected during a 24-hour period, conventionally divided into two twelve-hour phases: morning-evening and evening-morning.]

FE-6 Walker closed out her last (FD180) NUTRITION/Repository/Pro K 24-hr urine & blood sample collections, stowing the urine collection hardware, removed the rotor from the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) and stowed the blood sampling gear. Wrapping up her last Pro K regimen, Shannon also photographed the filled-out Pro K logsheets and transferred the logfile for downlink.

FE-1 Kaleri conducted the periodic maintenance of the active Russian BMP Harmful Impurities Removal System, starting the “bake-out” cycle to vacuum on absorbent bed #2 of the regenerable dual-channel filtration system. The process will be terminated at ~4:30pm EST before sleep time. Bed #1 regeneration was performed yesterday by Fyodor. [Regeneration of each of the two cartridges takes about 12 hours and is conducted only during crew awake periods. The BMP’s regeneration cycle is normally done every 20 days. (Last time done: 11/1-11/2).]

FE-2 Skripochka configured the hardware for the Russian MBI-21 PNEVMOKARD experiment, then conducted the 1h15m session, his 2nd, which forbids moving or talking during data recording. The experiment is controlled from the RSE-med A31p laptop and uses the TENZOPLUS sphygmomanometer to measure arterial blood pressure. The experiment was then closed out and the test data were downlinked via OCA. [PNEVMOKARD (Pneumocard) attempts to obtain new scientific information to refine the understanding about the mechanisms used by the cardiorespiratory system and the whole body organism to spaceflight conditions. By recording (on PCMCIA cards) the crewmember’s electrocardiogram, impedance cardiogram, low-frequency phonocardiogram (seismocardiogram), pneumotachogram (using nose temperature sensors), and finger photoplethismogram, the experiment supports integrated studies of (1) the cardiovascular system and its adaptation mechanisms in various phases of a long-duration mission, (2) the synchronization of heart activity and breathing factors, as well as the cardiorespiratory system control processes based on the variability rate of physiological parameters, and (3) the interconnection between the cardiorespiratory system during a long-duration mission and the tolerance of orthostatic & physical activities at the beginning of readaptation for predicting possible reactions of the crewmembers organism during the their return to ground.]

In preparation for his return to gravity in three days, FE-5 Yurchikhin undertook the first session (of two) of his final training session of the Russian MO-5 MedOps protocol of cardiovascular evaluation in the below-the-waist reduced-pressure device (ODNT, US: LBNP) on the Russian VELO ergometer, assisted by Kaleri as CMO (Crew Medical Officer). The activity was then closed out. [The assessments, lasting 1.5 h, supported by ground specialist tagup (VHF) and telemetry monitoring from Russian ground sites (at 4:21am EST), uses the Gamma-1 ECG equipment with biomed harness, skin electrodes and a blood pressure and rheoplethysmograph cuff wired to the cycle ergometer's instrumentation panels. The Chibis ODNT provides gravity-simulating stress to the body’s cardiovascular/circulatory system for evaluation of the crewmembers’ orthostatic tolerance (e.g., the Gauer-Henry reflex) after several months in zero-G. The preparatory training generally consists of first imbibing 150-200 milliliters of water or juice, followed by two cycles of a sequence of progressive regimes of reduced (“negative”) pressure, set at -15, -20, -25, and -30 mmHg for five min. each, then -20, -25, and -35 mmHg (Torr) for 10 min. each plus 30mmHg for 5 min. while shifting from foot to foot at 10-12 steps per minute, while wearing a sphygmomanometer to measure blood pressure. The body’s circulatory system interprets the pressure differential between upper and lower body as a gravity-like force pulling the blood (and other liquids) down. Chibis data and biomed cardiovascular readings are recorded. The Chibis suit (not to be confused with the Russian “Pinguin” suit for spring-loaded body compression, or the "Kentavr" anti-g suit worn during reentry) is similar to the U.S. LBNP facility (not a suit) used for the first time on Skylab in 1973/74, although it appears to accomplish its purpose more quickly.]

Skripochka serviced the running experiment TEKh-22 “Identifikatsiya” (Identification) in MRM1 (Mini Research Module 1) Rassvet, downloading structural dynamic data collected by the IMU-Ts microaccelerometer to the RSE1 A31p laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground via OCA. [IMU-Ts is a part of the MRM1 SBI onboard measurement system, installed in PGO behind panel 104.]

In the US Airlock, FE-3 terminated the recharge on the second batch of EMU batteries in the BSA (Battery Stowage Assembly) initiated yesterday by Wheelock.

Shannon & Scott had ~2 hrs for a joint handover review of the planned STS-133/ULF5 Robotics operations with the SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System), including DOUG (Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics). [DOUG is a special application running on the MSS RWS (Mobile Service System Robotics Work Station) laptops that provides a graphical birdseye-view image of the external station configuration and the SSRMS arm, showing its real-time location and configuration on a laptop during its operation.]

Later (12:55pm), FE-6 & FE-3 discussed the ULF5 robotics ops with ground specialists in a 45-min teleconference.

In the SM (Service Module), Alex Kaleri collected KAV condensate water samples from the SRV-K2M Condensate Water Processor (water recovery system) upstream of the FGS gas/liquid mixture filter/separator in an empty drink bag, a periodic check on the performance of the FGS, then changed out sampler & separator and collected KAV samples from upstream of the SRV-K2M BKO water purification (multifiltration) unit. The sampling equipment was then disassembled and discarded.

Afterwards, FE-1 also sampled the BRP-M (Modified Water Distribution & Heating Unit) in the SM, after flushing out its TEPL warm port valve several times with water from an EDV container and catching it in a second EDV, then drawing the samples from the Hot & Warm valve in two drink bags for return to Earth.

CDR Wheelock collected “Exp-25 Week 8” samples of potable water for chemical and microbial analysis from the SVO-ZV, SRV-K Warm & SRV-Hot taps, the latter after preliminary heating of the water (three heating cycles) and flushing. [Collected were two 500 mL micro postflight samples for chemical post-flight analysis, two 150mL samples for in-flight microbial analysis from each of three ports (SRV-K Hot, SRV-K Warm, SVO-ZV), plus one 20mL in-flight silver detection sample from the SVO-ZV. The flush water, collected in three small waste water bags, was then reclaimed for technical use.]

In the USOS (US Segment), Doug sampled for two TOCA (Total Organic Carbon Analyzer) runs, one directly from the WRS (Water Recovery System) and a second from the PWD (Potable Water Dispenser). [For the in-flight chemistry/microbiology analysis, Doug used MCDs (microbial capture devices) from the U.S. WMK (water microbiology kit) for treatment/processing after no more than 6 hours of the collection (done ~12:00pm EDT). Sample analysis included subsequent processing of water samples in the MWAK (microbial water analysis kit) for inflight coliform bacteria (Escherichia coli) detection. Results of the on-board processing will be available after a two-day incubation period (T+2d), in case of the MWAK after 4-6 days of incubation.]

Wheelock also deployed four passive FMK (Formaldehyde Monitoring Kit) sampling assemblies in the Lab (at bay P3, below CEVIS) and SM (at the most forward handrail, on panel 307) for two days, to catch any atmospheric formaldehyde on a collector substrate for subsequent analysis on the ground. [Two monitors each are usually attached side by side, preferably in an orientation with their faces perpendicular to the direction of air flow.]
As a regular periodic task, Alex tightened the BVZ (bystros`Ñ‘mnykh vintovykh zazhinov) quick-release screw clamps on the SSVP docking mechanism at the MRM1-FGB interface.

Kaleri performed the periodic calibration & adjustment test of the O2 sensor of the SM SOGS (Pressure Control & Atmospheric Monitoring System) IK0501 gas analyzer (GA), using the BKGA/Gas Analyzer Calibration Assembly and IGZ/Analyzer Status Indicator (constituent meter), supported by ground specialist tagup. [IK0501 is an automated system for measuring CO2, O2, and H2O in the air as well as the flow rate of the gas being analyzed.]

The CDR supported EMCS (European Modular Cultivation System) research by pushing three valves, located on EMCS Holding Structure to make sure that the pressure (or resistance) is low.

Fyodor Yurchikhin had ~2.5 hrs reserved for packing, transferring & loading cargo on Soyuz 23 S for return on 11/25.

Wheelock spent about one hour on prepacking & transferring US cargo to the Soyuz spacecraft. [Return cargo goes in the Descent Module (SA), and other discarded stuff in the BO Orbital Module (BO), to be separated and jettisoned during reentry.]

Later, Wheels & Shannon reviewed procedures for collecting crewmember body samples for the JAXA experiment MYCO (Mycological Evaluation of Crew Exposure to ISS Ambient Air). [MYCO evaluates the risk of microorganisms via inhalation and adhesion to the skin to determine which fungi act as allergens on the ISS. MYCO samples are collected from the nasal cavity, the pharynx and the skin of crew during preflight, in flight and postflight focusing particularly on fungi which act as strong allergens in our living environment. Before sample collection, crewmembers are not to eat or drink anything except water, nor wash their face, brush their teeth, or gargle after you wake up to avoid science loss.]

Oleg Skripochka worked several hours on a new round of monthly preventive maintenance of RS (Russian Segment) ventilation systems.

In the MRM2 Poisk research module, FE-2 cleaned the VD1 & VD2 air ducts, then moved to the SM to clean Group A ventilator fans and grilles.

Oleg also performed his 3rd data collection for the psychological MBI-16 Vzaimodejstvie (“Interactions”) program, accessing and completing the computerized study questionnaire on the RSE-Med laptop and saving the data in an encrypted file. [The software has a “mood” questionnaire, a “group & work environment” questionnaire, and a “critical incidents” log. Results from the study, which is also mirrored by ground control subjects, could help to improve the ability of future crewmembers to interact safely and effectively with each other and with Mission Control, to have a more positive experience in space during multi-cultural, long-duration missions, and to successfully accomplish mission activities.]

Skripochka then completed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

FE-5 Yurchikhin did the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Fyodor also made preparations for a microbial air sampling session scheduled tomorrow with the MedOps SZM-MO-21 ECOSFERA equipment, initiating charging on the Ecosphere power pack (BP) and readying the KRIOGEM-03 thermostatic container(at -22 degC) for the samples. [The equipment, consisting of an air sampler set, a charger, power supply unit, and incubation tray for Petri dishes, determines microbial contamination of the ISS atmosphere, specifically the total bacterial and fungal microflora counts and microflora composition according to morphologic criteria of microorganism colonies.]

Kaleri, Skripochka & Kelly teamed up for a one-hour handover review of emergency roles and responsibilities as Exp-25 comes to an end and the Exp-26 crew of Alex, Oleg & Scott takes over.

Before sleeptime, Oleg will set up the Russian MBI-12 payload and start his 5th Sonokard experiment session, using a sports shirt from the Sonokard kit with a special device in the pocket for testing a new method for acquiring physiological data without using direct contact on the skin. Measurements are recorded on a data card for return to Earth. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

Doug, Shannon & Fyodor again had an hour each set aside for personal crew departure preparations; these are standard pre-return procedures for crewmembers.

CDR, FE-1, FE-2, FE-5 & FE-6 had their regular weekly PMCs (Private Medical Conferences), via S- & Ku-band audio/video, Wheels at ~5:05am, Shannon at ~5:25am, Fyodor at ~9:55am, Oleg at ~12:05pm, Alex at ~1:50pm EST.

At ~11:20am, CDR Wheelock, FE-3 Kelly & FE-6 Walker supported a PAO TV event with the U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC, attended by the Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, NASA Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin and students from grades 6-8 and educators from Hart and Deal Middle Schools plus employees/representatives from NASA HQ, Dept. of Education and Teach For America.

The crew worked out on today’s 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (FE-6), TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-2, FE-5), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR, FE-3, FE-5, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR, FE-3), and VELO bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1/2x, FE-2). [T2 snubber arm inspection is no longer needed after every T2 session but must be done after the last T2 session of the day.]

No CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uploaded today except for some nighttime city opportunities.

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 5:45am EST [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 350.2 km
Apogee height – 354.8 km
Perigee height – 345.6 km
Period -- 91.54 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0006875
Solar Beta Angle -- -67.8 deg (magnitude decreasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.73
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 80 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 68,852.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/25/10 -- ISS Reboost – 12:03am EST; 7m38s;delta-V 1 m/s; delta-h 1.77 km)
11/25/10 -- Soyuz TMA-19/23S undock/landing ~8:22pm/11:46pm EST (End of Increment 25)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/03/10 -- STS-133/Discovery launch (2:52am EST) – NET (not earlier than)
12/05/10 -- STS-133/Discovery docking (FD3)
12/13/10 -- STS-133/Discovery landing (KSC: 10:03pm, Orbit 171, nominal)
12/15/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S launch – Kondratyev (CDR-27)/Coleman/Nespoli (2:09pm)
12/17/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S docking (MRM1) (~3:09pm)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
01/20/11 -- HTV2 launch
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/27/11 -- HTV2 berthing (Node-2 nadir)
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking (DC1)
02/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch
02/19/11 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
02/24/11 -- HTV2 unberthing (Node-2 nadir)
02/26/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” docking (SM aft)
02/27/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) launch
03/01/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) docking
03/11/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) undock
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch – A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking (DC1)
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/04/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------