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November 19, 2010
ISS On-Orbit Status 11/19/10

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

At day’s begin, FE-2 Skripochka conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [Oleg will again inspect the filters before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

FE-6 Walker continued her current 4-day session of the medical protocol Pro K (Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery), her 5th onboard run, with controlled diet and diet logging after the urine pH spot test. [Under Pro K, the crewmember measures and logs the pH value of a urine sample, to be collected the same time of day every day for 4 days. The crewmember also prepares a diet log and then annotates quantities of food packets consumed and supplements taken.]

At wakeup (1:00am EST), CDR Wheelock closed out his last (FD180) NUTRITION/Repository/Pro K 24-hr urine collections and completed his FD180 generic blood draws, with FE-3 Kelly assisting with the phlebotomy as operator, then set up the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) for spinning the samples prior to stowing them in the MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS). [The operational products for Blood & Urine collections for the HRP (Human Research Program) payloads have been revised, based on crew feedback, new cold stowage hardware, and IPV capabilities. Generic blood & urine procedures have been created to allow an individual crewmember to select their payload complement and see specific requirements populated. Individual crewmembers will select their specific parameter in the procedures to reflect their science complement. Different crewmembers will have different required tubes and hardware configurations, so they should verify their choice selection before continuing with operations to ensure their specific instruction.]

Walker & Wheelock also performed their 3rd liquid saliva collection of the INTEGRATED IMMUNE protocol. The collections are made every other day for the next six days. [INTEGRATED IMMUNE (Validating Procedures for Monitoring Crew member Immune Function) samples & analyzes participant’s blood, urine, and saliva before, during and after flight for changes related to functions like bone metabolism, oxidative damage and immune function to develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. The strategy uses both long and short duration crewmembers as study subjects. The saliva is collected in two forms, dry and liquid. The dry samples are collected at intervals during the collection day using a specialized book that contains filter paper. The liquid saliva collections require that the crewmembers soak a piece of cotton inside their mouths and place it in a salivette bag; there are four of the liquid collections during docked operations. The on-orbit blood samples are collected right before undocking and returned to the ground so that analysis can occur with 48 hours of the sampling. This allows assays that quantify the function of different types of white blood cells and other active components of the immune system. Samples are secured in the MELFI (Minus-Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS). Also included are entries in a fluid/medications intact log, and a stress-test questionnaire to be filled out by the subject at begin and end. Urine is collected during a 24-hour period, conventionally divided into two twelve-hour phases: morning-evening and evening-morning.]

The crew conducted the periodic pre-breakfast session of the Russian biomedical routine assessment PZEh-MO-8/Body Mass Measurement, using the IM mass measurement device set up by Yurchikhin who later stowed it away again. In addition to MO-8, the three Russian crewmembers, Alex, Oleg & Fyodor, also completed the PZEh-MO-7/Calf Volume Measurement protocol. [For determining body mass in zero-G, where things are weightless but not massless, the Russian IM "scales" for MO-8 measure the inertial forces that arise during the oscillatory motion of a mass driven by two helical metering springs with known spring constants. By measuring the time period of each oscillation of the unknown mass (the crewmember) and comparing it to the period of a known mass, the crewmember’s mass is calculated by the computer and displayed. MO-7 Calf measurements (left leg only) are taken with the IZOG device, a custom-sewn fabric cuff that fits over the calf, using the knee and lower foot as fixed reference pints, to provide a rough index of deconditioning in zero-G and effectiveness of countermeasures. ]

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Shannon Walker configured the PPFS (Portable Pulmonary Function System) hardware including MBS (Mixing Bag System), and then conducted her 5th and final session with the VO2max assessment, integrated with Thermolab. After concluding without issues, Walker downloaded the data to a PCS (Portable Computer System) laptop, powered down, cleaned up and fully stowed all equipment (next VO2max to be done by Cady Coleman in late December). [The experiment VO2max uses the PPFS, CEVIS ergometer cycle, PFS (Pulmonary Function System) gas cylinders and mixing bag system, plus multiple other pieces of hardware to measure oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and more. The exercise protocol consists of a 2-min rest period, then three 5-min stages at workloads eliciting 25%, 50% & 75% of aerobic capacity as measured pre-flight, followed by a 25-watt increase in workload every minute until the crewmember reaches maximum exercise capacity. At that point, CEVIS workload increase is stopped, and a 5-min cool down period follows at the 25% load. Rebreathing measurements are initiated by the subject during the last minute of each stage. Constraints are: no food 2 hrs prior to exercise start, no caffeine 8 hrs prior to exercise, and must be well hydrated.]

FE-1 Kaleri completed his 2nd session with the Russian behavioral assessment TIPOLOGIA (MBI-20), setting up the workstation, connecting equipment, suiting up and launching the program on the RSK1 laptop. [Skripochka assisted in donning the electrode cap, preparing the head for the electrodes, applying electrode gel from the Neurolab-RM2 kit and taking documentary photography. Data were recorded on a PCMCIA memory card and downlinked via OCA comm. MBI-20 studies typological features of operator activity of the ISS crews in long-term space flight phases, with the subject using a cap with EEG (electroencephalogram) electrodes. The experiment, which records EEGs, consists of the Lüscher test, “adaptive biological control” training, and the games Minesweeper and Tetris. The Lüscher color diagnostic is a psychological test which measures a person's psychophysical state, his/her ability to withstand stress, to perform and to communicate. It is believed to help uncover the cause of psychological stress, which can lead to physical symptoms. An EEG measures and records the electrical activity of the brain.]

FE-5 Yurchikhin configured the hardware for the Russian experiment PNEVMOKARD (MBI-21), then conducted the 1h15m session, his 5th, which forbids moving or talking during data recording. Oleg took documentary photography. The experiment is controlled from the RSE-med A31p laptop and uses the TENZOPLUS sphygmomanometer to measure arterial blood pressure. The experiment was then closed out and the test data were downlinked via OCA. [PNEVMOKARD (Pneumocard) attempts to obtain new scientific information to refine the understanding about the mechanisms used by the cardiorespiratory system and the whole body organism to spaceflight conditions. By recording (on PCMCIA cards) the crewmember’s electrocardiogram, impedance cardiogram, low-frequency phonocardiogram (seismocardiogram), pneumotachogram (using nose temperature sensors), and finger photoplethismogram, the experiment supports integrated studies of (1) the cardiovascular system and its adaptation mechanisms in various phases of a long-duration mission, (2) the synchronization of heart activity and breathing factors, as well as the cardiorespiratory system control processes based on the variability rate of physiological parameters, and (3) the interconnection between the cardiorespiratory system during a long-duration mission and the tolerance of orthostatic & physical activities at the beginning of readaptation for predicting possible reactions of the crewmembers organism during the their return to ground.]

Kaleri, Skripochka & Yurchikhin took the monthly O-OHA (On-Orbit Hearing Assessment) test, a 30-min NASA environmental health systems examination to assess the efficacy of acoustic countermeasures, using a special software application on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) laptop. [The O-OHA audiography test involves minimum audibility measurements for each ear over a wide range of frequencies (0.25-10 kHz) and sound pressure levels, with the crewmembers using individual-specific Prophonics earphones, new Bose ANC headsets (delivered on 30P) and the SLM (sound level meter). To conduct the testing, the experimenter is supported by special EarQ software on the MEC, featuring an up/down-arrow-operated slider for each test frequency that the crewmember moves to the lowest sound pressure level at which the tone can still be heard. The baseline test is required not later than about Flight Day 14 for each new Expedition and is then generally performed once per month. Note: There has been temporary hearing deficits documented on some U.S. and Russian crewmembers, all of which recovered to pre-mission levels.]

FE-3 Kelly took digital photography of 5 RIC (Rack Interface Controller) “debug” screens on the ER1 ELC RIC (EXPRESS Rack 1 Laptop Computer) for subsequent downlink from SSC-6 (Station Support Computer 6).

Kelly also installed the 3 PaRIS (Passive Rack Isolation System) lock-down alignment guides on the FCF (Fluids & Combustion Facility) in the CIR (Combustion Integrated Rack) to protect the rack from external loading events such as dockings & reboosts.

In Node-3, FE-3 installed the four alignment guides at the T2/COLBERT treadmill for load protection during the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment) Kabin removal, which he completed with Shannon Walker. After the Kabin move, the T2 guides were temporarily uninstalled to enable crew workout.

Scott then performed Part 1 of today’s scheduled CDRA (Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly) troubleshooting. [Part 1 had him install a filter over the AAA (Avionics Air Assembly) inlet on the Node-3 AR2 (Atmosphere Revitalization Rack 2) to protect the hardware and allow AAA to run with the right rack access door open, enabling utilization of the MCA (Major Constituents Analyzer) by ECLSS ground controllers, if the CDRA configuration troubleshooting in Part 2 cannot be resolved.]

For Part 2, Shannon & Scott had ~1h 40m set aside. Afterwards, Kabin was re-installed in Node-3 by Kelly & Wheelock, which again required temporary locking of the T2 treadmill with its alignment guides. [Ground analysis of yesterday’s measurements and imagery appeared to indicate that two launch restraint bolts in the rear of the CDRA rack could be engaged in another set of drilled holes, preventing the CDRA Slide Assembly from moving out. If so, an attempt was to be made to realign the assembly to free it for withdrawal. If successful, CDRA was to be temporarily stowed, and the CDRA two-stage pump ORU (Orbit Replaceable Unit) was to be taken out to give the crew better access to physically remove the launch restraint bolts.]

After powering up the Cupola RWS DCP (Robotics Workstation Display & Control Panel) in Node-3, Scott Kelly assisted the ground on the SSRMS MSS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System Mobile Service System) in doing HB (Hot Backup) on-orbit checkouts required for the berthing of HTV-2 (H-II Transfer Vehicle 2) next January at Node-2 nadir. Shannon later powered down the CUP RWS DCP. [With CUP RWS as “Main” and the Lab RWS as HB, Scott first transitioned ops to the latter, then performed a capture and a release in free space using three DCP switch throws. After some manual and auto-sequence maneuvering on the HB string, FE-3 concluded with the dry run of a workaround for transitioning between Main & HB that will be used for HTV-2.]

In preparation of their return on 11/25, Yurchikhin, Wheelock & Walker subjected their Sokol spacesuits in Soyuz 23S to the standard hermeticity (leak check) procedure, then set them and the Sokol gloves up for airing (drying) out. Afterwards, the protective apparel was packed and stowed aboard 23S.

Oleg Skripochka had ~3.5h reserved for collecting surface samples in the FGB from equipment and structures behind specific panels (429, 430, 114, 115, 230, 229, 315, 314), using swabs from a specimen tube kit.

Alex Kaleri performed major routine IFM (Inflight Maintenance) in the SM (Service Module)’s ASU (toilet facility), changing out replaceable parts with new components, viz., the DKiV pretreat & water dispenser, BD-U urine sensor unit, SOT wring collector, and A8A-9060-900 indicator unit. All old parts were trashed in Progress 39P, and the IMS (Inventory Management System) was updated. [The pre-treat liquid, a mix of H2SO4 (sulfuric acid) and CrO3 (chromium oxide, for oxidation and purple color), is mixed with water in the DKiV dispenser and used for toilet flushing.]

Afterwards, FE-1 performed periodic service of the RS (Russian Segment) radiation payload suite “Matryoshka-R” (RBO-3-2), collecting eight Bubble dosimeters (A21-A28) and reading their recorded radiation traces in a special Reader. Afterwards, the dosimeters were initialized for new measurements and redeployed. [The complex Matryoshka payload suite is designed for sophisticated radiation studies. Note: Matryoshka is the name for the traditional Russian set of nested dolls.]

Kaleri switched the RS STTS comm assets from the prime to the backup string, a standard practice, and at ~7:30am EST, over RGS (Russian Groundsite), conducted a routine STTS comm test of the UKV-2 (VHF-2) radio channel from the SM.

Doug Wheelock teamed up with Scott Kelly for a 1h5m handover period to familiarize the FE-3 with activities to be transferred to him after Wheels’ departure on 23S.

Fyodor Yurchikhin had ~45 min to continue the stowage process on Soyuz 23S, arranging return cargo in the SA Descent Module (spuskayemyy apparat) for transfer to a representative at the landing site, and trash & other discarded stuff in the BO Orbital Module.

The Exp-25 crew of Yurchikhin, Wheelock & Walker had an hour each set aside for personal crew departure preparations, standard pre-return procedures for crewmembers.

Skripochka did the daily IMS maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Oleg also completed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

CDR & FE-6 had their standard PMCs (Private Medical Conferences), via S- & Ku-band audio/video, Shannon at ~7:00am, Wheels at ~10:05am EST.

At ~2:30am, the crew held the regular (nominally weekly) tagup with the Russian Flight Control Team (GOGU/Glavnaya operativnaya gruppa upravleniya), including Shift Flight Director (SRP), at TsUP-Moscow via S-band/audio, phone-patched from Houston and Moscow.

At ~5:40am, Alex linked up with TsUP/Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly RS IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

At ~9:20am, Shannon had her regular IMS stowage conference with Houston stowage specialists.

At ~11:40am, Doug powered up the SM's amateur radio equipment (Kenwood VHF transceiver with manual frequency selection, headset, & power supply) and at 11:45am conducted a ham radio session with students at Holy Family Catholic School, Grand Junction, Colorado.

At ~3:30pm, the crew is scheduled for their weekly teleconference with ISS Program Management at JSC/Houston via Ku-band/video & S-band/audio.

At ~4:00pm, Doug Wheelock will have his weekly PFC (Private Family Conference) via S-band/audio and Ku-band/MS-NetMeeting application (which displays the uplinked ground video on an SSC laptop).

The crew worked out on today’s 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (FE-3), TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-1, FE-2, FE-5), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR, FE-3, FE-5, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR FE-6), and VELO bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1, FE-2). [T2 snubber arm inspection is no longer needed after every T2 session but must be done after the last T2 session of the day.]

No CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uplinked today. [ISS daylight-awake orbit tracks have progressed into a seasonal pattern in which they temporarily parallel the terminator. Consequently most of the nadir views of CEO target areas fall below the criterion for illumination, with darkness to the left of track and adequate lighting right of track. This condition is expected to persist for the next seven to ten days.]

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 8:49am EST [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 350.5 km
Apogee height – 355.5 km
Perigee height – 345.5 km
Period -- 91.55 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0007385
Solar Beta Angle -- -69.3 deg (magnitude increasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.73
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 101 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 68,791.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/25/10 -- ISS Reboost
11/25/10 -- Soyuz TMA-19/23S undock/landing ~8:22pm/11:46pm EST (End of Increment 25)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/03/10 -- STS-133/Discovery launch (2:52am EST) – NET (not earlier than)
12/05/10 -- STS-133/Discovery docking (FD3)
12/15/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S launch – Kondratyev (CDR-27)/Coleman/Nespoli (2:09pm)
12/17/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S docking (MRM1) (~3:09pm)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
01/20/11 -- HTV2 launch
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/27/11 -- HTV2 berthing (Node-2 nadir)
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking (DC1)
02/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch
02/19/11 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
02/24/11 -- HTV2 unberthing (Node-2 nadir)
02/26/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” docking (SM aft)
02/27/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) launch
03/01/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) docking
03/11/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02) undock
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch – A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking (DC1)
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/04/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------