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GPM Mission Updates

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GPM Status Updates

GPM Update
Fri, 2014-06-172 10:48 a.m. EDT

The first set of data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission is now available to the public.

The data set consists of GPM Microwave Imager instrument observations, called brightness temperatures. Brightness temperatures are a measurement of naturally occurring energy radiated, in this case, by precipitation particles like raindrops or snowflakes. Other data sets, like the rain rate information, will be released later this summer. By themselves, however, the brightness temperatures convey valuable data on the location and structure of storm systems – including tropical cyclones and hurricanes. The earlier-than-expected data release is part of an effort to give forecasters the best possible data for the full summer Atlantic hurricane season.

All GPM data products will be released to the public by September 2. Current and future data sets are available to registered users from NASA Goddard's Precipitation Processing Center website at: http://pps.gsfc.nasa.gov/


GPM Update
Fri, 2014-05-02 10:38 a.m. EDT

The GPM spacecraft continues to perform normally. The GPM Microwave Imager and Dual-frequency Precipitation radar continue operations and calibration.

The spacecraft performed two routine maneuvers. The first was a 180-degree yaw (left/right in the horizontal plane) turn. This is the second yaw turn that changes the orientation of the spacecraft; it is now flying forwards again. Yaw turns are performed approximately every 40 days for thermal control, as the angle between the spacecraft's orbit and the sun changes. This keeps the side of the spacecraft designed to remain cold from overheating.

The second routine maneuver performed was a delta-v burn to increase the velocity of the spacecraft and maintain altitude. An extremely thin layer of atmosphere still exists at GPM's altitude of 250 miles above Earth's surface. As the spacecraft flies through the thin gases, drag occurs, slowing – and lowering – the spacecraft. Delta-v burns occur weekly to maintain altitude.


GPM Update
Fri, 2014-04-11 2:32 p.m. EDT

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. Calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continued.


GPM Update
Fri, 2014-04-04 3:53 p.m. EDT

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. On April 2, the GPM Core Observatory fired its thrusters for an 80-second delta-V burn that accelerated the spacecraft and circularized its orbit. The Core Observatory is now flying in its final orbit, 253 miles (407 kilometers) above Earth's surface.

Calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continued. On March 30 and 31, additional DPR external calibrations took place using the Active Radar Calibration site in Tsukuba, Japan. For the March 31 calibration test, the Core Observatory's orientation was changed by a 90-degree turn (yaw) and a slight tilt (pitch) to provide better visibility to the ground site at Tsukuba and to better calibrate the instrument.


GPM Update
Fri, 2014-03-28 3:43 p.m. EDT

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. On April 2, the GPM Core Observatory fired its thrusters for an 80-second delta-V burn that accelerated the spacecraft and circularized its orbit. The Core Observatory is now flying in its final orbit, 253 miles (407 kilometers) above Earth's surface.

Calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continued. On March 30 and 31, additional DPR external calibrations took place using the Active Radar Calibration site in Tsukuba, Japan. For the March 31 calibration test, the Core Observatory's orientation was changed by a 90-degree turn (yaw) and a slight tilt (pitch) to provide better visibility to the ground site at Tsukuba and to better calibrate the instrument.


GPM Update
Fri, 2014-03-28 3:43 p.m. EDT

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory commissioning activities continued normally this week. Both the GPM Microwave Imager and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) are collecting science data and NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency released the first images from the instruments on March 25.

The DPR's functional checkout activities and internal calibration continued. The first external calibration using the Active Radar Calibration site in Tsukuba, Japan, was performed on March 23. 

A 120-second "Delta-V" burn was successfully completed Wednesday. This burn raised the orbit apogee (highest point). Next week's burn will raise the orbit perigee (lowest point) and circularize the orbit.


GPM Update
Fri, 2014-03-21 9:41 a.m. EDT

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally. Both the GPM Microwave Imager and Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar are collecting science data. Functional checkout activities and internal calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar continued.

On March 17, the team executed GPM's first scheduled yaw turn to turn the orientation of the spacecraft 180 degrees. Yaw is the left/right orientation in the horizontal plane of the spacecraft's motion. The spacecraft is now "flying backwards." Yaw maneuvers will be performed approximately every 40 days for spacecraft thermal control, as the angle between the spacecraft's orbit and the sun changes. This keeps the side of the spacecraft that is designed to remain cold from overheating. Yaw maneuvers are performed primarily using the spacecraft's reaction wheels.

March 19, the team performed a 50-second delta-V maneuver, an increase in speed to boost the altitude of its orbit, using its thrusters. GPM has twelve thrusters: four forward and eight aft. Wednesday's maneuver was the first delta-V performed using the forward thrusters, since the spacecraft is now in in the opposite orientation after the yaw turn.


GPM Update
Thurs, 2014-03-13 1:47 p.m. EDT

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is performing normally.

On March 12, the GPM Core Observatory fired its thrusters for a 30-second check-out of their performance. The burn, called a delta-v, changes the velocity of the spacecraft to adjust the altitude of its orbit. This week's short maneuver did not greatly alter the satellite's orbit but was used instead for further calibration of the thrusters.

Functional checkout activities and internal calibration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar continued this week.

Both DPR and the GPM Microwave Imager have begun collecting data on rain and snow, and the science team at the Precipitation Processing System at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. has begun the process of verifying data accuracy. Precipitation data will be released no later than 6 months post-launch.


GPM Update
Mon, 2014-03-10 9:20 a.m. EDT

On Saturday, March 8, just after 10 a.m. EST, the second of the two science instruments aboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory was activated, and the teams in the mission operations center and launch support room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., began the instrument's checkout period.

DPR functional checkout activities and internal calibrations continued on Sunday and will continue this week and next. DPR data is being sent through the Precipitation Processing System at Goddard to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Mission Operations System (MOS) in Tsukuba, Japan.

The DPR will make detailed three-dimensional measurements of precipitation structures and rates, and with the GPM Core Observatory's expanded coverage, will do so across much more of Earth's surface. The DPR's two frequencies, Ka- and Ku-band, allow measurements of a broader range of precipitation: from frozen precipitation and light rain to heavy rainfall. NEC Toshiba Space Systems Ltd. built the DPR, which was designed by JAXA with the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology in Japan.


GPM Update
Thu, 2014-03-06 3:12 p.m. EST

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory is performing normally.

The initial checkout of the GMI instrument and the spacecraft showed both are performing as expected, and the GMI instrument continues to collect science data on rain and snowfall.


GMI Science Check-out
Wed., 2014-03-05 3:24 p.m. EST

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory is performing normally. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) continues in science mode, and GMI data is being sent to the Precipitation Processing System (PPS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Using the initial data, the instrument team has verified that GMI is working well on-orbit.  

The GPM Core Observatory will have a 60 day on-orbit check out period to ensure the healthy operation of the spacecraft and instruments. Precipitation data will be released from the PPS no later than 6 months post-launch, after the science teams verify their accuracy.


 
GMI spins up, goes to science mode
Tues., 2014-03-04 4:37 p.m. EST

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory is performing normally. Today, the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument started to spin at its normal rate and collect science data on rain and snowfall.

The GMI instrument is a multi-channel microwave radiometer that uses 13 channels to measure the intensity of the microwave energy emitted from Earth's surface and atmosphere. GMI will detect total precipitation within all layers of clouds, including snow and ice, and rain from drizzles to downpours.


GPM Checks Out Thruster Performance

Mon, 2014-03-03 4:49 p.m. EST

Today, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission Core Observatory successfully fired its thrusters for 5 seconds to check out the thruster performance. This type of maneuver, called a delta-V, changes the velocity of the spacecraft to adjust the altitude of its orbit. Today's delta-V resulted in only a very slight change in the orbit, but will help the GPM team assess and calibrate the thruster performance.

By contrast, yesterday the team pulsed each maneuvering thruster three to six times, but for only 100 milliseconds each time. This was long enough to make sure the thrusters were working, but not enough to calibrate them.


GPM Status Update for 3/2/14
Sun, 2014-03-02 5:15 p.m. EST

Following yesterday’s activities with the two science instruments associated with the Global Precipitation Measurement core observatory, the flight control team’s attention today is focused on the observatory’s onboard maneuvering thrusters.

The satellite has a dozen thrusters: four forward and eight aft. The flight team is activating and initializing the thrusters over the course of today. A brief (5 second) propulsion burn to further calibrate the thrusters is planned for early this week.

GPM’s propulsion system has two functions. First, to adjust its orbit and maintain altitude, and second, to compensate for the spacecraft drifting toward Earth.


GPM Status Update for 3/1/14
Sat, 2014-03-01 8:20 p.m. EST

Following activation and warm up of the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) electronic systems, the team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., deployed the main reflector of the U.S. science instrument for the GPM Core Observatory.

A significant step was also achieved today in the activation of the science instrument provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with the turning on of the controller for the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR).

The DPR will provide three-dimensional information about precipitation particles derived from reflected energy by these particles at different heights within the cloud system. The two frequencies of the DPR also allow the radar to infer the sizes of precipitation particles and offer insights into a storm’s physical characteristics.


GPM Status Update for 3/1/14
Sat, 2014-03-01 12:30 p.m. EST

Checkout of the GPM core observatory continues normally.

Friday evening, GPM flight controllers at NASA Goddard began using the satellite’s High Gain Antenna system for high-rate data rate transmissions through NASA’s orbiting fleet of Tracking Data Relay Satellites.

Having high-rate data flowing through the TDRS system allows the spacecraft recorder to be downloaded more frequently. During science operations, TDRS communication will allow availability of science data within 3 hours of measurement.

Just after 11 a.m. EST on Saturday, March 1st, the flight team began the activation of one of the two main science instruments on the GPM observatory – the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager or GMI.

Initial activation involves turning on the instrument control electronic systems and then allowing several hours for things to warm up.

GMI is the U.S. science contribution to the mission and was designed, developed and built by Ball Aerospace.

When it begins full-time observations, the GMI instrument will play an essential role in the worldwide measurement of precipitation. GMI will be extremely beneficial to forecasters during extreme weather events and data gathered will allow scientists to both track tropical cyclones and forecast their progression or provide the best ever data of falling snow observed from space.


GPM Status Update for 2/28/14
Fri, 2014-02-28 5:00 p.m. EST

The GPM Core Observatory is performing normally.

The GPS system has been switched on. This tells the satellite the time and its location with respect to the Earth's surface.

The team is readying the spacecraft to use its High Gain Antenna for high data-rate communication through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System.


High Gain Antenna Deployed
Thu, 2014-02-27 9:42 p.m. EST

The GPM Core Observatory continues power positive, stable on the sun line and communicating with the GPM Mission Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The spacecraft magnetic torquer bar polarity was adjusted to eliminate rotational momentum gain. Star trackers were turned on and the High Gain Antenna was successfully deployed.

Within the next day or two, the spacecraft controllers at NASA Goddard will begin to use the antenna to communicate with  the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System for commands from the ground, data and health and safety information from the satellite.

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, a joint Earth-observing mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), thundered into space atop a Japanese H-IIA rocket from Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan at 1:37 p.m. EST Thursday, Feb. 27 (3:37 a.m. JST Friday, Feb. 28).

"With this launch, we have taken another giant leap in providing the world with an unprecedented picture of our planet's rain and snow," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "GPM will help us better understand our ever-changing climate, improve forecasts of extreme weather events like floods, and assist decision makers around the world to better manage water resources."

The GPM Core Observatory is the first of NASA's five Earth science missions launching this year. With a fleet of satellites and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns, NASA monitors Earth's vital signs from land, air and space.

For more information about NASA's Earth science activities this year, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow


GPM Momentum and High Gain Antenna Status
Thu, 2014-02-27 7:20 p.m. EST

The GPM spacecraft is power positive, stable on the sun line and communicating with the GPM Mission Operations Center (MOC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The GPM flight control teams at NASA Goddard are studying a situation with the spacecraft where the satellite is gaining a small amount of rotational momentum. In a normal state, there are environmental forces on the spacecraft that are corrected by the momentum wheels and magnetic torquer bars. At this time, the momentum wheels are being used more than expected. This situation does not pose any threat to the health of the mission/spacecraft in the short term, but it must be corrected.

Deploying the high gain antenna (HGA) would increase the environmental forces, so the deployment is being deferred until the momentum gain is understood and corrected. Delaying an HGA deployment is not an unusual situation for a satellite that is in the early portion of flight and checkout.

Personnel in the GPM Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Launch Support Room (LSR) at NASA Goddard are working on software table updates to the satellite to resolve the momentum issue.

The next update on the flight and checkout of the GPM Core Observatory will come on Friday, Feb. 28 (US time) as part of the status reports that will be issued daily for the first week of the mission.


GPM Power Positive
Thu, 2014-02-27 2:18 p.m. EST

The GPM Core Observatory has successfully deployed its solar arrays and is stable and pointed at the sun.

GPM’s solar arrays are pointed at the sun and collecting power. We have confirmation that the arrays are rotating properly, charging the batteries and providing power to the spacecraft.


Solar Array Deployment Begins
Thu, 2014-02-27 2:04 p.m. EST

GPM has two arrays to power the spacecraft because of its orbit. It circles the Earth at an angle slanted 65 degrees up from the equator. This means it does not cross the equator at the same time every day – an advantage for monitoring rainfall at different times of day and night.


GPM Separation
Thu, 2014-02-27 1:53 p.m. EST

We have spacecraft separation! The GPM Core Observatory is flying on its own in orbit. The bolts holding it to the second stage successfully severed and the second stage has fallen back. GPM is flying on battery power until its two solar arrays deploy shortly.


GPM Starts Transmitting on non-HGA Transmitters
Thu, 2014-02-27 1:47 p.m. EST

The GPM Core Observatory has begun transmitting telemetry on to Mission Operations Control at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. 


Second Stage Engine Ignition (SEIG)
Thu, 2014-02-27 1:45 p.m. EST

The upper stage of the H-IIA continues to propel the GPM Core Observatory into space.


Payload Fairing Jettison
Thu, 2014-02-27 1:42 p.m. EST

The nosecone fairing that protected the GPM Core Observatory through the atmosphere has safely separated and fallen away. The main engine will continue to burn for 2 minutes 31 seconds, taking the Core Observatory higher into orbit.


Liftoff!
Thu, 2014-02-27 1:38 p.m. EST

We have LIFTOFF of the NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory from Japan on an H-IIA rocket.

To better understand Earth's weather and climate cycles, the GPM Core Observatory will collect information that unifies and improves data from an international constellation of existing and future satellites by mapping global precipitation every three hours.


Launch Countdown Operations Begin
Thu, 2014-02-27 12:40 p.m. EST

The green light has been given to the X-60 minutes countdown operation for launch of the NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan.

Launch is scheduled for 3:37 a.m. JST (Feb. 27 at 1:37 p.m. EST).


Second Flight Attitude Control Test Completed
Thu, 2014-02-27 12:20 p.m. EST

A second scheduled test of the guidance and control system on the H-IIA launch vehicle has been completed to confirm that all devices for flight attitude control are working as expected.

NASA Television has begun coverage of the GPM Core Observatory launch originating from Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Watch online at: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv


H-IIA First and Second Stages Fueled

Thu, 2014-02-27 11:00

The liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks of the H-IIA launch vehicle first and second stages have been fully loaded. Checks of the radio frequency system between the H-IIA and ground stations have been completed.


H-IIA Guidance and ControlSystem "Go"

Thu, 2014-02-27 09:30

The Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory is continuing to move successfully toward launch.

Programs have been run on the guidance and control system on the H-IIA launch vehicle to confirm that all devices for flight attitude control are working as expected.

The one-hour launch window for the GPM Core Observatory opens at Feb. 27 at 1:37 p.m. EST (Feb. 28 at 3:37 a.m. JST).


Launch Preparations Proceed After Second Go/No Decision

Thu, 2014-02-27 06:50

The launch of the GPM Core Observatory is proceeding toward launch at Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. Final checks have been made for the operational conditions of the H-IIA launch vehicle, satellites, launch facilities, tracking and control systems, and weather conditions.

The process of loading propellant, such as liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, into the rocket has begun.

Terminal countdown operations also begun. Access to the launch pad is now restricted within a radius of 400 meters.


H-IIA Rocket Rolls to the Launch Pad

Thu, 2014-02-27 01:35

On Feb. 27 (Japan time) the H-IIA launch vehicle carrying the NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory arrived at the Tanegashima Space Center launch pad. The H-IIA, mounted on a mobile launcher, began to roll out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at 1:04 p.m. JST (Feb. 26 at 11:04 p.m. EST) and arrived at Launch Pad 1 at 1:26 p.m. JST, travelling a distance of about 500 meters. The launch vehicle is now being connected to the pad facilities.

U.S. Ambassador Caroline Kennedy watched the H-IIA roll out as part of her visit to Tanegashima Space Center for the GPM launch.


H-IIA Rocket Rolls to the Launch Pad

Thu, 2014-02-27 01:30

On Feb. 27 (Japan time) the H-IIA launch vehicle carrying the NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory arrived at the Tanegashima Space Center launch pad. The H-IIA, mounted on a mobile launcher, began to roll out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at 1:04 p.m. JST (Feb. 26 at 11:04 p.m. EST) and arrived at Launch Pad 1 at 1:26 p.m. JST, travelling a distance of about 500 meters. The launch vehicle is now being connected to the pad facilities.

U.S. Ambassador Caroline Kennedy watched the H-IIA roll out as part of her visit to Tanegashima Space Center for the GPM launch.


H-IIA Rocket Rolls to the Launch Pad

Thu, 2014-02-27 01:20

On Feb. 27 (Japan time) the H-IIA launch vehicle carrying the NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory arrived at the Tanegashima Space Center launch pad. The H-IIA, mounted on a mobile launcher, began to roll out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at 1:04 p.m. JST (Feb. 26 at 11:04 p.m. EST) and arrived at Launch Pad 1 at 1:26 p.m. JST, travelling a distance of about 500 meters. The launch vehicle is now being connected to the pad facilities.

U.S. Ambassador Caroline Kennedy watched the H-IIA roll out as part of her visit to Tanegashima Space Center for the GPM launch.


Feb 26: GPM Go for Launch

Wed, 2014-02-26 05:45

The GPM Core Observatory has received a green light for launch! 

On the morning of Feb. 26 (Japan time) at Tanegashima Space Center, chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and NASA reviewed the readiness of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory for launch on an H-IIA rocket on Feb. 28 (Japan time). All launch vehicle and launch facility actions relevant to the GPM launch were reported complete. The review panel gave the approval to proceed with launch.

The Launch Readiness Review confirmed a change to the launch time. Launch is now scheduled for a one-hour window that opens Feb. 27 at 1:37 p.m. EST (Feb 28 at 3:37 a.m. JST). The change was made after a collision avoidance analysis between the GPM spacecraft and the International Space Station.

If the launch is delayed by one day or into March, a new collision avoidance analysis will be conducted and a new launch window set within a two-hour window beginning 1:07 p.m. EST (3:07 a.m. JST).

The weather forecast is favorable for launch. Weather at T-0 is forecast to be some scattered clouds with light winds, neither of which are expected to affect launch. Winds at launch are forecast to be 13 mph (violation is 47 mph).

The H-IIA launch vehicle is scheduled to roll out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on Feb. 26 at 11 p.m. EST (Feb. 27 at 1 p.m. JST) and move to the launch pad. Weather is not expected to affect the rollout.

Live coverage of the launch begins Feb. 27 at 12 noon EST on NASA Television and will be streamed live at: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv


GPM Status Update: Feb 26

Wed, 2014-02-26 05:35

The GPM Core Observatory has received a green light for launch!

On the morning of Feb. 26 (Japan time) at Tanegashima Space Center, chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and NASA reviewed the readiness of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory for launch on an H-IIA rocket on Feb. 28 (Japan time). All launch vehicle and launch facility actions relevant to the GPM launch were reported complete. The review panel gave the approval to proceed with launch.

The Launch Readiness Review confirmed a change to the launch time. Launch is now scheduled for a one-hour window that opens Feb. 27 at 1:37 p.m. EST (Feb 28 at 3:37 a.m. JST). The change was made after a collision avoidance analysis between the GPM spacecraft and the International Space Station.

If the launch is delayed by one day or into March, a new collision avoidance analysis will be conducted and a new launch window set within a two-hour window beginning 1:07 p.m. EST (3:07 a.m. JST).

The weather forecast is favorable for launch. Weather at T-0 is forecast to be some scattered clouds with light winds, neither of which are expected to affect launch. Winds at launch are forecast to be 13 mph (violation is 47 mph).

The H-IIA launch vehicle is scheduled to roll out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on Feb. 26 at 11 p.m. EST (Feb. 27 at 1 p.m. JST) and move to the launch pad. Weather is not expected to affect the rollout.

Live coverage of the launch begins Feb. 27 at 12 noon EST on NASA Television and will be streamed live at: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv


GPM Status Update: Feb 26

Wed, 2014-02-26 02:20

On Tuesday, Feb. 25 (Japan time) at the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, pyrotechnics were connected on the H-IIA launch vehicle that will carry the NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory into space. In addition, the attitude control system that will control the second stage of the launch vehicle was fueled.


GPM Status Update: Feb 25

Tue, 2014-02-25 08:50

The NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is on schedule to liftoff from Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan during a launch window that opens in just over 52 hours (Thursday, Feb. 27 at 1:07 p.m. EST).

Launch services provider Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) performed checks on the propulsion and electrical systems on the H-IIA rocket that will carry the GPM Core Observatory into space.


› More GPM status updates from NASA's GPM project website

Page Last Updated: June 18th, 2014
Page Editor: Rob Garner