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Utor (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
August 15, 2013

Ex-Tropical Storm Utor Still Raining on Southern China  [image-158]

NASA satellite data revealed that the day after Typhoon Utor made landfall in southern China, its circulation still appeared intact despite weakening over land.

Typhoon Utor's eye made landfall around 0730 UTC/3:30 a.m. EDT on Aug. 14. On Aug. 15, Utor was still dropping rain over southern China.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over China at 03:25 UTC on Aug. 15 (11:25 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of Utor. The MODIS image showed Utor still had a circulation, despite weakening to a low pressure area.

On Aug. 15, Utor was raining over the western part of the Guandong Province, the eastern part of the Guangxi Province and southern part of the Hunan Province. Despite areas of moderate rainfall, all warnings had been dropped by the China Meteorological Administration on Aug. 15.

Aljazeera News reported that Utor was responsible for the death of one person and five people were still missing as of Aug. 15. Utor was the twelfth tropical cyclone to hit China in 2013.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 14, 2013 - NASA Sees Powerful Typhoon Utor Making Landfall in China  [image-112]

NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites captured views of Typhoon Utor's heavy rainfall and extent as it was making landfall in China. 

Torrential rain and powerful winds accompanied typhoon Utor when it came ashore in southern China's Guangdong province. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or   TRMM satellite flew overhead as Typhoon Utor was headed toward southern China on Aug. 13, 2013 at 2156 UTC (5:56 p.m. EDT). At the time TRMM flew overhead in space, Typhoon Utor was a powerful storm with wind speeds reaching over 85 knots/~98 mph.

A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments was overlaid on an infrared image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Bands of intense rainfall were evident in the image that were spiraling into the eye.[image-128]

At NASA Goddard, TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data were used to create a high resolution 3-D map of Typhoon Utor's radar reflectivity values. Many strong thunderstorms were measured by TRMM PR to reach heights of at least 15 km/~9.3 miles.

On Aug. 14, at 05:45 UTC/1:45 a.m. EDT less than two hours before Typhoon Utor's center made landfall in China's Guangdong Province, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the typhoon. The image showed the center beginning to make landfall and a powerful band of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the west and southwest.

Typhoon Utor's eye made landfall around 0730 UTC/3:30 a.m. EDT on Aug. 14.[image-144]

According to CBC news, a cargo ship sunk from Utor's rough seas and strong winds, while on land residents evacuated in the Guangdong Province.

On Aug. 14 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Typhoon Utor's maximum sustained winds were still near 75 knots/86 mph/139 kph. Utor was 157 nautical miles/180 miles/291 km west of Hong Kong, near 22.2 north and 111.2 east. The typhoon was moving to the northwest at 7 knots/8 mph/13 kph and weakening rapidly because of its interaction with land.

Radar data showed that the strongest thunderstorms and heaviest rainfall was occurring on the western side of the storm. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that radar from Yangjiang, China showed tightly-curved bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center.

Utor is expected to continue weakening while moving northwest then west over the next two days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 


August 13, 2013 - NASA Identifies Heavy Rainfall in South China Sea's Typhoon Utor [image-96]

As Typhoon Utor was exiting the northwestern Philippines, NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and detected some heavy rainfall in Utor's thunderstorm "feeder-bands" as it re-strengthened over the South China Sea.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Utor on August 12, 2013 at 0621 UTC/2:21 a.m. EDT as it was exiting the Philippines into the South China Sea.

To form a complete picture of rainfall and cloud extent of Utor, TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data were added into a combination Infrared/Visible image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. TRMM PR found rain falling at a rate of over 73mm/~2.9 inches per hour in well-defined thunderstorm feeder bands extending over the South China Sea. TRMM PR also found that heavy rain in these lines of rain were returning radar reflectivity values greater than 50.5 dBZ.

When Utor was exiting the Philippines yesterday, Aug. 12, the storm's maximum sustained winds had fallen to 85 knots/97.8 mph/157.4 kph. By Aug. 13 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT the warm waters of the South China Sea had helped strengthen Utor, and maximum sustained winds were near 95 knots/109.3 mph/175.9 kph.

Utor's center is located near 19.5 north and 113.1 east, about 190 nautical miles south-southwestward of Hong Kong. Utor is moving to the west-northwestward at 6 knots/7 mph/11.1 kph. Utor's powerful winds are generating very high, and rough seas. Maximum significant wave heights were reported near 41 feet/12.5 meters. 

Although Utor's winds had increased since yesterday, animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery today showed that the convective (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) structure of the system has started to weaken, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC. JTWC noted the convective bands had become shallower and weaker after 5 a.m. EDT today (Aug. 14). Infrared data also showed that the eye had become ragged in nature.

Typhoon Utor is predicted to move toward the west-northwest and make landfall in China tomorrow, Aug. 14 between Hainan Island and Hong Kong. More specifically, the forecast track from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center takes Utor's center somewhere between Zhanjiang and Maoming, Guangdong, China. The two cities are about 75 miles/121 kilometers apart.

The JTWC expects Utor to weaken after landfall and curve to the west-southwest over northern Vietnam, where it will begin to dissipate.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center


August 12, 2013 - NASA Satellites Capture Super-Typhoon Utor Before and After Landfall [image-51]

Four NASA satellites provided data on Super-Typhoon Utor before and after the storm made landfall in the Philippines. Satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua, Terra, TRMM and CloudSat satellites captured information about the powerful Super-Typhoon on Aug. 11 and 12. That data was used by forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center before and after Utor hit the Philippines. 

On Sunday, Aug. 11 at 0719 UTC (3:19 a.m. EDT) NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite captured rates of heavy rainfall around the storm's center and western quadrant near 1.4 inches per hour. At that time, Utor's rainfall had already started spreading over the northern and central Philippines.[image-78]

NASA's CloudSat satellite captured a sideways view of Super-Typhoon Utor that sliced through the storm's center on Aug. 11 just before the system hit the Philippines. Cloudsat revealed large amounts of liquid and ice water were abundant at middle and lower levels of the storm system, which were an indication of the storm's strength.

On Sunday, Aug. 11 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Utor's maximum sustained winds were near 130 knots/150mph/241 kph. It was centered just east of the Philippines near 15.7 north and 123.2 east. That's about 169 nautical miles east-northeast of Manila. Utor was moving to the west-northwest at 10 knots/11.5 mph/18.5 kph and headed for landfall.

In less than 13 hours, Super-Typhoon Utor's center crossed the Philippines and the storm weakened into a typhoon.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the then weakened Typhoon Utor on Monday, Aug. 12 at 02:55 UTC (10:55 p.m. EDT/Aug. 11) as it was moving into the South China Sea. Utor had weakened to a typhoon after crossing the land and its center was near the Lingayen Gulf on the country's western side. Microwave and infrared satellite instrument imagery revealed an eye after Utor emerged over open water.

By 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Utor's center had already crossed over the Philippines from east to west and emerged in the South China Sea. Maximum sustained winds had dropped to 85 knots/97.8 mph/157.4 kph. Typhoon Utor was located approximately 346 nautical miles/398 miles/641 km southeastward of Hong Kong, near 17.9 north and 117.3 east and has tracked west-northwestward at 14 knots/16 mph/26 kph.

A large number of warnings in remain effect today, Aug. 12, as Typhoon Utor moves through the South China Sea and away from the Philippines. Public storm warning signal #1 is still in effect in the following provinces: Abra, Kalinga, Apayao, Isabela, Aurora, Quirino, Nueva Ecija, Tarlac, Ilocos Norte, Pampanga, Bataan and Zambales. Public storm warning signal #2 is in effect in the provinces of: Nueva Vizcaya, Ifugao, Mt. Province, Ilocos Sur, Benguet, La Union and Pangasinan.

Reuters News Service reported on Aug. 12 that one person died and there were at least 13 people missing. Reuters also noted that the hardest hit town was Casiguran in Aurora province on the Philippines' east coast. Casiguran is the unofficial capital of the northern part of Aurora and is well-known for its beaches and recreation. Utor caused power outages, agricultural damages and landslides.  

[image-36]

After weakening over the Philippines, Utor is expected to re-strengthen in the South China Sea before making a final landfall in southeastern China. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the current track of the storm takes the center between Hainan Island, China and Hong Kong for a landfall on Aug. 14.

On Aug. 13 at 11:15 a.m. EDT (15:15 UTC), the Hong Kong Observatory issued Standby Signal, No. 1 which means that Utor is within 800 kilometers of Hong Kong.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA's CloudSat satellite captured this sideways slice of clouds and precipitation in Typhoon Utor on Aug. 11 just before the system hit the Philippines. Large amounts of liquid and ice water (deep reds and pink color) are abundant at middle and lower levels of the storm system.
Image Credit: 
NASA/Colorado State
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[image-36]
MODIS image of Utor on Aug. 11
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this stunning image of Super-typhoon Utor approaching the Philippines on Aug. 11 at 05:15 UTC (1:15 a.m. EDT). The eye of the storm is east of the central Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-51]
MODIS Image of Utor on Aug. 12
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Utor leaving the Philippines on Aug. 12 at 02:55 UTC (10:55 p.m. EDT/Aug. 11) when its center was near the Lingayen Gulf on the country's western side.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-78]
Typhoon Utor
NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall rates of over 73mm/hr (~2.9 inches) happening in Typhoon Utor on Aug. 12 at 2:21 a.m. EDT as it was exiting the Philippines into the South China Sea.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-96]
MODIS imgage of Utor
On Aug. 14, at 05:45 UTC/1:45 a.m. EDT less than 2 hours before Typhoon Utor's center made landfall in China's Guangdong Province, NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of the typhoon.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-112]
TRMM image of Utor
NASA's TRMM satellite measured many strong thunderstorms in Typhoon Utor on Aug. 13 that were at least 15 km/~9.3 miles high (red). Bands of intense rainfall spiraling into the eye were evident in the image.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-128]
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On Aug. 13, NASA's TRMM satellite measured many strong thunderstorms in Typhoon Utor that were at least 15 km/~9.3 miles high (red). Click here to see a simulated 3-D flyby animation.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-144]
MODIS image of Utor
NASA's Terra satellite passed over China at 03:25 UTC on Aug. 15 (11:25 p.m. EDT) and captured this visible image that showed Utor still has an obvious circulation.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-158]
Page Last Updated: August 15th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner