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Simon (Eastern Pacific)
October 9, 2014

[image-77]Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Simon's Remnants Moving Through U.S.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite has captured visible and infrared images of Hurricane Simon since birth, and a new animation of the data created by NASA shows Simon's landfall in Mexico and movement into the U.S. Southwest. The remnants are expected to move into the U.S. central Plains and Midwest on Oct. 9 and 10.  

Images from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Oct. 6 through Oct. 9 were made into a 39 second animation by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The animation shows Simon as a Tropical Storm in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 6 when it was located off the coast of Baja California, Mexico. The animation shows Simon's landfall and movement into mainland Mexico. Over the course Oct. 6 through 9, Simon's circulation center dissipated and the clouds and showers spread into northern Mexico and the U.S. Southwest.

During the morning of Thursday, Oct. 9, Simon's remnants were over the U.S. desert Southwest. That remnant moisture is expected to meander toward the Colorado Front Range by Thursday evening. 

On Oct. 9, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) noted moisture from the remnants of Tropical Storm Simon is expected to bring heavy rain to portions of the central Plains and Midwest on Thursday into Friday. "Storm-total rainfall amounts of 2 to 3 inches are possible across parts of eastern Kansas and western and central Missouri, bringing a threat of flash flooding," NWS stated in a short range forecast discussion.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-150]Oct. 08, 2014 - NASA Sees Simon Spreading Over U.S. Southwest

The remnants of Hurricane Simon were fanning out over the desert Southwestern U.S. on Oct. 8 and NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the thunderstorms expected to bring flash flooding.

NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) indicated on Oct. 8, that Simon's remnants would be bringing heavy rain and the possibility of flash flooding to the desert Southwest. NWS noted "Moisture associated with the remnants of Tropical Storm Simon will bring showers and isolated thunderstorms to parts of the Desert Southwest on Wednesday. Rainfall totals of up to an inch or more are possible across much of Arizona, which could lead to flash flooding in some locations. The threat for heavy rain and flash flooding will move into the central Plains later in the week."

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on the clouds and thunderstorms that make up the remnants of Hurricane Simon. On Oct. 7 at 21:05 UTC (5:05 p.m. EDT), AIRS showed tall, cold cloud tops from Simon stretching from northern Baja California over Arizona and into southern Utah. 

The last advisory on the depression was issued by the National Hurricane Center on Oct. 7 at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT). At that time the center was located near 27.9 north and 116.3 west, or about 75 miles west of Punta Eugenia, Mexico. The remnants were moving to the north-northeast.

The NWS in Albuquerque, New Mexico issued a bulletin on Oct. 8 at 5:32 a.m. MDT concerning the hazardous weather expected from Simon's remnants: Showers and thunderstorms associated with remnants of former Hurricane Simon will move into western New México today and Tonight. Quick storm motions will limit the threat of flooding...though some minor flooding will be possible...mainly overnight. Moderate to locally heavy rainfall is possible Thursday (Oct. 9) and Thursday night across northern and western New Mexico.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-132]Oct. 07, 2014 - Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Simon Over Baja California

NOAA's GOES-West satellite took a picture of Tropical Storm Simon weakening over Mexico's Baja California.

On Oct. 7, a Tropical Storm Watch was in effect for Punta Abreojos to Punta Eugenia, Mexico. The National Hurricane Center expects Simon to produce storm total rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches with isolated amounts around 8 inches through Wednesday, Oct. 8, across northern portions of the Baja California Peninsula and the state of Sonora in northwestern Mexico. Over the next few days, storm total rainfall amounts of 1 to 2 inches with isolated amounts of around 4 inches are expected across portions of Arizona. This rainfall could cause flash flooding and mud slides.

In addition, winds to tropical storm force are still possible within the Watch area today. Simon continues to generate large swells that will affect portions of the Baja California Peninsula and the coast of southern California today. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite took a visible picture of Tropical Storm Simon on Oct. 7 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT). The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The image showed Simon's clouds over Baja California and northwestern mainland Mexico. Simon's northernmost clouds stretched into the U.S. southwest. Despite its large appearance, during the morning of Oct. 7, only small area of showers were showing on radar near the north-central Baja California peninsula.  

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Oct. 7, Simon's maximum sustained winds were down to 40 mph (65 kph) and weakening. The center of Tropical Storm Simon was located near latitude 27.7 north and longitude 116.7 west. That's about 100 miles (160 km) west of Punta Eugenia, Mexico. Simon is moving toward the north-northeast near 9 mph (15 kph) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 24 to 36 hours.

The National Hurricane Center expects Simon to continue weakening and become a remnant low pressure area by Oct. 8. NHC noted that "Simon's surface circulation or its remnant low pressure area is likely to dissipate while it moves into the southwestern United States, unless it fails to survive its passage over the mountainous Baja peninsula during the next day or so."

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 06, 2014 - Tropical Storm Simon Says, "U.S. Southwest is an "Arm's Reach"  

[image-114]Infrared satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows what looks like an arm from Tropical Storm Simon's northern quadrant, reaching over Baja California to mainland Mexico. Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted that Simon is just an "arm's reach" to the southern U.S. and expect rainfall and rough surf to affect that area of the country.

On Oct. 6 at 0347 UTC (Oct. 5 at 11:47 p.m. EDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder called AIRS that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured cloud top temperature data on Simon. On band of thunderstorms wrapping into Simon's center from the north extended east over Baja California to mainland Mexico, resembling an arm.

AIRS data showed some strong thunderstorms remained around the center of Simon. Those cloud top temperatures were as cold as -62F/-53C indicating that they were high in the troposphere and capable of generating heavy rainfall.

Simon Bringing Heavy Rainfall and Rough Surf to Western Mexico

The heavy rainfall Simon is packing is threat to Baja California and mainland Mexico, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Simon is expected to produce storm total rainfall amounts of 3 to 6 inches with isolated amounts around 9 inches over the next several days across central and northern portions of the Baja California peninsula and the state of Sonora in northwestern Mexico.

Simon also continues to generate rough surf along portions of the Baja California peninsula.  The NHC expects the swells to begin subsiding on Oct. 7.

Simon's Remnants Expected to Affect U.S. Southwest

NHC noted that rainfall is expected to spread into portions of the U.S. desert Southwest.  This rainfall could cause flash flooding and mud slides. In addition, the rough surf battering the coast of Mexico's Baja California will be felt along parts of southern California's coast today and tomorrow, Oct. 6 and 7. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Swells should begin to subside on Wednesday, Oct. 7.

At 5 a.m. EDT on Oct. 6, Simon's maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph (95 kph) and weakening is expected during the next couple of days Simon's center was located near latitude 24.4 north and longitude 117.6 west. That's about 280 miles (455 km) southwest of Punta Eugenia, Mexico.  Simon is moving toward the north near 7 mph (11 kph) and is expected to turn to the north-northeast is expected by Oct. 7.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 


Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Simon Crawling Up Western Mexico's Coastline

[image-78]Tropical Storm Simon is following the path of several other tropical storms that formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean by crawling northward along the western coastline of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of Simon on Oct. 3 that showed the eastern side of the storm over Mexico.

An infrared image taken from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Oct .3 at 7:45 a.m. EDT showed strong thunderstorms circling Tropical Storm Simon's center and a fragmented band of thunderstorms in Simon's eastern quadrant bringing rainfall to western Mexico. Simon's center remains over open waters of the Eastern Pacific. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

On Oct. 3 at 5 a.m. EDT, the center of Tropical Storm Simon was located near latitude 18.3 north and longitude 108.9 west. That's about 140 miles (230 km) east-southeast of Socorro Island and 325 miles (520 km) south-southeast of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Simon was moving toward the west near 7 mph (11 kph) and a turn toward the west-northwest or northwest is anticipated on Saturday. The National Hurricane Center noted that maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph. (85 kph) and Simon is expected to become a hurricane by Saturday morning, Oct. 4.

Simon is expected to produce total rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches with isolated amounts around 8 inches through Friday night across Colima, Western Jalisco, Nayarit, Southern Sinaloa, and Baja California Sur in western Mexico over the next several days. These rains could cause flash flooding and mudslides. However, there are currently no watches or warnings in effect. Swells generated by Simon are affecting portions of the southwestern coast of Mexico. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Simon is expected to move away from the coast over the next couple of days and curve to the north on Sunday, tracking parallel to Baja California.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


 

Oct. 2, 2014 - Satellite Animation Shows Formation of Tropical Storm Simon Mexico's Southwestern Coast

Mexico's western coast is again dealing with rain, wind and rough surf from another tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the formation of Tropical Storm Simon on Oct. 2. A NASA animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery shows the development of Simon over three days (Bottom right).

[image-36][image-51]Simon developed when the tropical low pressure area designated as System 90E organized by 5 p.m. EDT on Oct. 1 and became Tropical Depression 19-E. On Oct. 2 at 5 a.m. EDT, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm as was renamed "Simon." An animation of three days' worth of visible and infrared images created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland showed those transitions.

Simon is the eighteenth named storm of the busy 2014 hurricane season in the east Pacific basin.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite has been providing continual coverage of the Eastern Pacific and has followed the development of Simon since it was System 90E. An infrared GOES-West satellite image taken on Oct. 2 at 13:15 UTC (9:15 a.m. EDT) showed Simon close to the western coast of Mexico.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted on Oct. 2 that satellite images show curved bands of thunderstorms) became better established during the morning hours on Oct. 2, and the low-level center is estimated to be located beneath the strong thunderstorm activity.

NHC has not posted watches or warnings on Simon, but the tropical storm is large and close enough to shore to generate some heavy rainfall totals and rough surf.

Simon is expected to produce rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches with isolated amounts around 8 inches through Friday, Oct. 3 across Western Guerrero and Michoacan, Colima, western Jalisco and Nayarit in western Mexico. These rains could cause flash flooding and mud slides.

Simon is generating ocean swells and rough surf that is already affecting southwestern Mexico's coast. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

At 5 a.m. EDT Simon had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kph) and some strengthening is forecast during the next two days. Simon's center was located near latitude 18.1 north and longitude 106.1 west. That's about 135 miles (215 km) west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico and Simon was moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to continue through Oct. 3. Simon's center is expected gradually move away from the southwestern coast of Mexico today.

The NHC's Forecaster Cangialosi noted that Simon is expected to strengthen during the next few days while the storm remains over warm water and within a fairly low wind shear and moist environment. Conditions will change in three days when the storm is expected to start on a weakening trend.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite over Oct. 6 through Oct. 9 shows Hurricane Simon's landfall and movement into the U.S. Southwest.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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tropical storm clouds over the coast of Mexico
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this infrared image of newborn Tropical Storm Simon on Oct. 2 at 9:15 a.m. EDT, when it was off the coast of southwestern Mexico.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Tropical Storm Simon as seen by GOES satellite
An infrared image taken from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Oct .3 at 7:45 a.m. EDT showed strong thunderstorms circling Tropical Storm Simon's center and a fragmented band of thunderstorms in Simon's eastern quadrant bringing rainfall to western Mexico.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on Tropical Storm Simon on Oct. 6.
NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on Tropical Storm Simon on Oct. 6 at 0923 UTC (5:23 a.m. EDT) reading cloud top temperatures. Strongest storms, coldest cloud tops appear in (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/ Ed Olsen
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GOES image of Simon
NOAA's GOES-West satellite took a visible picture of Tropical Storm Simon on Oct. 7 at 10:45 a.m. EDT. The image showed Simon's clouds over Baja California and northwestern mainland Mexico.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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AIRS image of Simon
On Oct. 7 at 21:05 UTC (5:05 p.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite saw tall, cold cloud tops from Simon's remnants stretching from northern Baja California over Arizona and into southern Utah.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
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Page Last Updated: October 9th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner