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Gil (Eastern Pacific)
August 7, 2013

Infrared NASA Image Revealed Fading Gil's Warming Cloud Tops[image-188]

As cloud tops fall, their temperature rises, and infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite saw that happening as Tropical Storm Gil weakened.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Gil on Aug. 6 at 22:59 UTC (6:59 p.m. EDT). The AIRS data showed that cloud top temperatures had warmed since the day before, indicating that the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone didn't have as much punch, or uplift to form more powerful storms. AIRS imagery is false-colored to show temperature and is created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

The last advisory on what is now Post-Tropical Cyclone Gil was issued on Aug. 7 at 0300 UTC (11 p.m. EDT on Aug. 6), by NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center. At that time, Gil's maximum sustained winds were down to 30 knots. Gil was centered about 935 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii, near 13.5 north and 142.5 west. Gil was moving west-northwest at 6 knots.

Gil has ceased to qualify as a tropical cyclone and its remnants are expected to continue moving in a westerly direction far south of Hawaii.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 06, 2013 - NASA Sees Gil Return to Tropical Storm Status, Henriette Still a Hurricane[image-172]

Tropical Depression Gil regained strength after moving into warmer waters and an area with lighter wind shear as Hurricane Henriette hangs on. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared look at both storms showing powerful thunderstorms around each of their centers of circulation.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on both Gil and Henriette on Aug. 6 at 10:39 UTC (6:39 a.m. EDT). At that time both Tropical Storm Gil and Hurricane Henriette had large areas of strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops around their centers. The cloud top temperatures in both storms were colder than -63F/-52C, which indicates thunderstorms high into the troposphere. Thunderstorms that high are also indicative of moderate to heavy rainfall.

Gil Regains Strength

Tropical Depression Gil regained tropical storm status today as maximum sustained winds increased to near 40 mph/65 kph. The Central Pacific Hurricane Center or CPHC is now issuing advisories on Gil because it moved into their forecast territory. CPHC forecasters expect Gil will gradually strengthen during the next 48 hours.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, or 11 p.m. HST local Hawaii time on Aug. 5, the center of Tropical Storm Gil was located near latitude 13.3 north and longitude 141.0 west. That's about 1,035 miles/1,660 km east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. Gil is moving toward the west near 9 mph/15 kph and this motion is expected to continue over the next two days.  Gil is forecast to move west and move far south of the Hawaiian Islands over the weekend of Aug. 10 and 11.

Satellite data shows that deep convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm) has spread back over Gil's low level center. Previously, when Gil was a depression, the center became partly exposed to outside winds and that's no longer the case. Gil is moving over waters warm enough to support its strength. Infrared data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument revealed that the water temperatures around Gil are over 80F/26.6C. Gil is also moving into an area of lighter wind shear, which will also allow the storm to keep together and even strengthen. 

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 05, 2013 - NASA Eyes Two Eastern Pacific Tropical Cyclones: One Up, One Down[image 142]

Tropical Depression Gil has been weakening for a couple of days, while Tropical Storm Henriette appears to be strengthening in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured both storms in one image that clearly showed Henriette was the larger storm, and NASA's Aqua satellite peered under Henriette's clouds to reveal a developing eye.

Tropical Depression Gil is more than halfway to Hawaii from Mexico and continues to hold onto depression strength. Meanwhile, NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured both storms in one image on Aug. 5 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT). The imagery shows Tropical Storm Henriette dwarfed the smaller Gil. The infrared image was created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. GOES satellite imagery showed a circular concentration of thunderstorms tightly around Gil's small center, while Henriette, located to the east, is several times the size of Gil.

Gil is Tropically "Depressed"

On Monday, Aug. 4 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Gil was near latitude 13.4 north and longitude 138.6 west, about 1,175 miles/1,890 km east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. Gil is moving toward the west-southwest near 8 mph (13 kph) and is expected to continue in that direction for the next day and turn west. Gil's maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph (45 kph). Gil became a depression over the weekend of Aug. 3 and 4 after reaching hurricane status. Gradual weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1007 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Gil is weakening and will likely cease to qualify as a tropical cyclone in the next day or two. However, if Gil survives the adverse atmospheric environment and holds together, it would track far south of the Hawaiian Island chain over the weekend of Aug. 10 and 11.

NASA Infrared Data Shows a Developing Eye in Henriette

Infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed a developing eye in Tropical Storm Henriette. AIRS captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Henriette on August 5 at 0917 UTC (5:17 a.m. EDT). Strongest storms and heaviest rains appeared around the center where cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C. The GOES satellite imagery showed that Henriette had grown in size and dwarfs Tropical Depression Gil, located to its west.

Henriette developed from the System 90E which became the eighth tropical depression of the eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season over the weekend of Aug. 3 and 4.

On Aug. 5 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), Tropical Storm Henriette's maximum sustained winds had increased to near 60 mph/95 kph. Further strengthening is forecast by the National Hurricane Center and Henriette is expected to become a hurricane in the next day.

Henriette was located near latitude 12.1 north and longitude 128.2 west, about 1,415 miles (2,280 km west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Henriette is moving toward the west near 6 mph/9 kph and is expected to turn west-northwestward Minimum central pressure is near 999 millibars

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

 


08.02.13 - NASA Sees Active Tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean

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The Eastern Pacific Ocean has kicked into high gear on Aug. 2 and NOAA's GOES-15 satellite is watching Hurricane Gil and two developing tropical low pressure areas on both sides of Gil.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a very active Eastern Pacific ocean on Aug. 2 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) with one hurricane and two developing tropical low pressure areas. System 91E is farthest west and approaching the Central Pacific, while Hurricane Gil and System 90E trail behind to the east. The GOES-15 infrared image was created at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

System 91E Headed into Central Pacific Ocean

The low pressure area called "System 91E" has developed about 1,260 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center or CPHC in Honolulu, Hawaii are monitoring System 91E and expect any development to be slow. Because System 91E is moving into the Central Pacific Ocean it will soon become the responsibility of the CPHC. Currently, System 91E has a low chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

Hurricane Gil Sandwiched

Hurricane Gil is sandwiched between two low pressure areas: System 91E to the west and System 90E to Gil's east. Gil appears to be inhibiting System 90E's development, but that may change if Gil weakens or moves farther away from the low.

At 5 p.m. EDT on Aug. 2, Gil's maximum sustained winds were near 85 mph/140 kph. The National Hurricane Center expects little change in strength during the next two days.  

Gil was centered near 14.6 north latitude and 127.3 west longitude, about 1,275 miles/2,050 km west-southeast of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Gil is moving west at 13 mph/20 kph and this motion is expected to continue with some decrease in forward speed during the next two days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 985 millibars.

In the GOES-15 satellite imagery Gil appears less organized and the area of strongest convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) has been shrinking. Precipitable water imagery shows that drier air is wrapping into the eastern side of the storm and is likely the cause of the diminished organization.

Over the weekend of Aug. 3 and 4, the NHC expects slow weakening when Gil moves over progressively cooler water and into an environment of slightly stronger wind shear.

System 90E Being Affected by Hurricane Gil

Low pressure area called "System 90E" is still chasing Hurricane Gil. Located east of Gil, it is located about 900 miles southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula of Mexico. Gil is moving westward at about 10 to 15 mph.

System 90E is producing disorganized thunderstorms, but NHC noted that if Hurricane Gil weakens, System 90E get a chance to develop. Gil's close proximity to System 90E is adversely affecting the storm's ability to organize. System 90E was given a 30 percent or medium chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next two days, and a higher chance over the next 5 days. 

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

 


08.01.13 - NASA Sees Hurricane Gil Being Chased by Developing Storm[image-83][image-99]

On July 31, NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Gil intensifying and the storm became a hurricane. NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured views of Gil on Aug. 1 as it was being chased by another developing tropical system.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Hurricane Gil on August 1 at 10:11 UTC or 6:11 a.m. EDT.  Strongest storms and heaviest rains appear around the center where cloud top temperatures exceed -63F/-52. 

Microwave imagery on Aug. 1 from NASA's Aqua satellite and other satellites indicated that the cloud pattern of Gil was not as organized as it appeared overnight and on July 31. Microwave imagery on Aug. 1 did not even see the ragged eye that was visible the previous day.    

At 8 a.m. PDT/11 a.m. EDT on Aug. 1, Hurricane Gil's maximum sustained winds were near 80 mph (130 kph). The center of Hurricane Gil was located near latitude 14.5 north and longitude 124.2 west. Gil is far from land areas and is about 1,100 miles (1,770 km west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Gil is moving toward the west near 13 mph/20 kph. That motion is expected to continue for the next 48 hours.  The estimated minimum central pressure is 990 millibars

The National Hurricane Center noted that Gil is moving into more stable air and cooler waters, which will make any intensification over the next day brief, before the storm starts to weaken.

Traveling behind Gil, or to Gil's east, is System 90E. Imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 on Aug. 1 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) clearly showed Hurricane Gil and System 90E trailing behind. The image was created at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

This low pressure area is about 775 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California and 325 miles away from Hurricane Gil. System 90E is moving west at 10 mph and has a 50 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression in the next two days, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.


07.31.13 - NASA Finds Powerful Storms in Quickly Intensifying Tropical Storm Gil

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No sooner had Tropical Storm Flossie dissipated then another tropical cyclone called Tropical Depression 7E formed yesterday, July 30, in the eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA's TRMM satellite saw "hot towers" in the storm's center early on July 31, that indicated it would likely strengthen, and it became Tropical Storm Gil hours later.

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NASA and the Japan Space Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying tropical storm Gil on July 31, 2013 at 0455 UTC or 12:55 a.m. EDT. The TRMM satellite pass showed that Gil was already very well organized with intense bands of rain wrapping around Gil's future eye.

TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument found powerful storms near the center of Gil's circulation dropping rain at the rate of over 131 mm (~5.2 inches) per hour. Those powerful storms were "hot towers." A "hot tower" is a tall cumulonimbus cloud that reaches at least to the top of the troposphere, the lowest layer of the atmosphere. It extends approximately nine miles (14.5 km) high in the tropics. These towers are called "hot" because they rise to such altitude due to the large amount of latent heat. Water vapor releases this latent heat as it condenses into liquid. NASA research shows that a tropical cyclone with a hot tower in its eyewall was twice as likely to intensify within six or more hours, than a cyclone that lacked a hot tower.

On Wednesday, July 31 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT the center of Tropical Storm Gil was located near latitude 13.6 north and longitude 119.9 west, about 920 miles/1,475 km southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph (95 kph). Gil was moving to the west-northwest at 14 mph (22 kph) and had a minimum central pressure of 1,000 millibars.

Tropical storm Gil is predicted by the National Hurricane Center or NHC to move toward the west-northwest and become a minimal hurricane with winds of 75 knots (~86 mph) by August 1.

Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.


07.30.12 - A NASA Infrared Baby Picture of Tropical Depression 7E

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Tropical Depression 7E formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean during the morning of July 30, and a NASA satellite was overhead to get an infrared baby picture. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the depression  and saw strong, but fragmented thunderstorms around the center. 

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. AIRS creates infrared data that helps determine temperature, such as cloud top and sea surface temperatures.

AIRS captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 7E on July 30 at 08:08 UTC/4:07 a.m. EDT. AIRS infrared data showed that the strongest storms and heaviest rains appeared in fragmented thunderstorms around the center with cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), newborn Tropical Depression 7E or TD7E had maximum sustained winds near 30 mph (45 kph). It was far from land and is not expected to affect any land areas as it moves farther out to sea. TD7E was centered near 12.2 north latitude and 114.9 west longitude, about 810 miles/1,300 km south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. TD7E is moving to the west-northwest at 16 mph/26 kph and had a minimum central pressure of 1,008 millibars.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted in their discussion that TD7E is located in the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone or ITCZ, but has plenty of moisture and is over warm sea surface temperatures that will help it strengthen over the next couple of days.

Tropical Depression 7E is expected to move west-northwest and intensify into a tropical storm. The National Hurricane Center noted that it could later become a hurricane.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

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NASA's TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying Tropical Storm Gil on July 31 at 12:55 a.m. EDT. The TRMM satellite pass showed that Gil was already very well organized with intense bands of rain wrapping around the center with rainfall over 5.2 inches per hour.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-36]
satellite image of Eastern Pacific storm systems
NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured a very active Eastern Pacific ocean on Aug. 2 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) with one hurricane and two developing tropical low pressure areas.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image-61]
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Depression 7E on July 30 at 4:07 a.m. EDT.
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Depression 7E on July 30 at 4:07 a.m. EDT. Strongest storms (purple) and heaviest rains are in fragmented thunderstorms around the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
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[image-51]
 NASA's TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying Tropical Storm Gil on July 31 at 12:55 a.m. EDT.
NASA's TRMM satellite traveled above intensifying Tropical Storm Gil on July 31 at 12:55 a.m. EDT. The TRMM satellite pass showed that Gil was already very well organized with intense bands of rain wrapping around the center with rainfall over 5.2 inches per hour.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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NASA satellite captures this infrared image of Hurricane Gil on August 1 at 6:11 a.m. EDT.
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Hurricane Gil on August 1 at 6:11 a.m. EDT. Strongest storms and heaviest rains appear around the center where cloud top temperatures exceed -63F/-52C (purple).
Image Credit: 
JPL/Ed Olsen
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GOES-15 captured this image of Hurricane Gil being chased by developing low pressure System 90E on Aug 1, 2013.
NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Gil in the Eastern Pacific Ocean being chased by developing low pressure System 90E on Aug. 1 at 11 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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an archipelago of clouds crossing the east Pacific - labeled
In an infrared image on Aug. 5 at 8 a.m. EDT, NOAA's GOES-15 satellite imagery showed Tropical Depression Gil approaching the Central Pacific Ocean, and Tropical Storm Henriette located to Gil's east.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image 142]
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[image-158]
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite was taken on Aug. 6 at 10:39 UTC (6:39 a.m. EDT). Both Tropical Storm Gil and Hurricane Henriette have large circular areas of strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops around their centers (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Gil
This Aug. 6 infrared image from AIRS on NASA’s Aqua satellite showed that cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Gil were warming, a sign the storm was weakening.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL
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Page Last Updated: August 7th, 2013
Page Editor: Holly Zell