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Lorenzo (Atlantic Ocean)
October 25, 2013

Cold Front Coming to Swallow Remnants of Tropical Storm Lorenzo [image-172]

Satellite imagery on Oct. 25 showed a cold front approaching the remnants of Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the central Atlantic Ocean.

A visible image captured by NOAA's GOES-East satellite image showed the oval-shaped remnants of Tropical Storm Lorenzo east of a frontal system in the central Atlantic Ocean. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Lorenzo's remnants were generating disorganized showers and thunderstorms about 1,150 miles southwest of the Azores islands on Oct. 25. The remnant low pressure area is moving to the northeast at 10 mph, and environmental conditions are not expected to be cooperative to help Lorenzo regenerate. The National Hurricane Center gives Lorenzo's remnants a 20 percent chance to come back before it gets swallowed by the approaching cold front.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 24, 2013 - Dry Air and Cooler Waters Weakening Tropical Depression Lorenzo [image-156]

NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Lorenzo that showed very little convection happening throughout the system because of two environmental factors: dry air and cooler sea surface temperatures.

On Oct. 24 at 1415 UTC/10:15 a.m. EDT, a visible image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite showed Lorenzo as a tropical depression with good circulation, but little thunderstorm development around it. Late in the day on Oct. 23, the entire system was devoid of any deep convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone). By the early morning hours (EDT) on Oct. 24, there was one small area of convection flaring southeast of the center.

So what's sapping the strength from Lorenzo? Two things: dry air and cooler sea surface temperatures. Dry air is sapping the moisture and preventing thunderstorms from forming to keep Lorenzo alive. Cooler sea surface temperatures mean reduced evaporation, and less building of thunderstorms.

On Oct. 24 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT Lorenzo had maximum sustained winds near 35 mpg/55 kph. It was located near 29.8 north and 47.8 west, about 1,020 miles/1,640 km east of Bermuda. It was moving to the east-northeast at 5 mph/7kph. 

The National Hurricane Center forecasts Lorenzo will soon become a remnant low and dissipate sometime on Friday, Oct. 25. 

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 23, 2013 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Shows Wind Shear's Effect on Tropical Storm Lorenzo [image-124][image-140]

NASA's TRMM satellite data provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with a good look at how wind shear is affecting Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the Atlantic Ocean.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) using data from NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite noted in the discussion on Oct. 23 at 5 a.m. EDT that the data from the TRMM satellite pass at 0247 UTC/10:47 p.m. EDT on Oct. 22 "nicely showed the separation of the low- and mid-level cloud features due to northwesterly shear. Despite the [wind]shear, Lorenzo is maintaining deep convection."

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Lorenzo on Oct. 22 at 14:30 UTC/10:30 a.m. EDT that showed the strongest thunderstorms in the eastern quadrant of the storm.

At 5 a.m. EDT on Oct. 23, Tropical Storm Lorenzo had maximum sustained winds near 50 mph/85 kph. The center of Lorenzo was located near latitude 29.6 north and longitude 49.2 west, about 940 miles/1,515 km east of Bermuda. Lorenzo is moving east near 8 mph/13 kph and is expected to turn northeast in the next day. 

The NHC noted that Lorenzo will continue facing wind shear and will move into cooler waters, which will further sap its strength. In a couple of days, Lorenzo is expected to become a remnant low pressure area.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oct. 22, 2013 - NASA Sees Atlantic Depression Become Tropical Storm Lorenzo [image-92][image-108]

It took six hours for the thirteenth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season to organize and strengthen into Tropical Storm Lorenzo. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a "before" image and NOAA's GOES satellite captured an "after" image of the depression's transition.

Lorenzo was born on Oct. 21 at 11 a.m. as Tropical Depression 13L. By 5 p.m. EDT it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Lorenzo. Lorenzo is also the twelfth tropical storm of the Atlantic Ocean Hurricane Season, which means that just one depression did not reach tropical storm strength so far this year.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer known as the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression 13L in the Atlantic on Oct. 21 at 16:55 UTC/12:55 p.m. EDT  before it became Tropical Storm Lorenzo. The visible image showed the bulk of the depressions thunderstorms and clouds were in the eastern and northern quadrants of the storm.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Lorenzo on Oct. 22 at 1145 UTC/7:45 a.m. EDT as it continued strengthening in the central Atlantic Ocean. The GOES image showed that the bulk of clouds and showers had shifted to the north and west of the storm's center. In the GOES image, Lorenzo's strongest thunderstorms look almost like a horseshoe.

On Oct. 22 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC Lorenzo's maximum sustained winds had increased to near 50 mph/85 kph and the National Hurricane Center expects little change in strength, followed by a weakening trend on Oct. 23.  Those tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 70 miles/110 km from Lorenzo's center.

Lorenzo's center was located far from land areas. It was near latitude 29.5 north and longitude 52.0 west, about 785 miles/1,260 km east of Bermuda. Lorenzo was moving toward the east-northeast near 8 mph/13 kph. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1003 millibars.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) expect that Lorenzo is going to experience stronger wind shear from the northwest as it moves further northeast into cooler waters. Both of those factors are expected to take a toll on the storm and weaken it. By Oct. 25, Lorenzo is expected to become an elongated area of low pressure, a trough, ahead of an approaching cold front.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 21, 2013 - NASA Animation Shows Birth of Thirteenth Atlantic Tropical Depression [image-51][image-78]

The thirteenth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean season formed today, Oct. 21 and NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured its development. NASA's GOES Project created an animation from the NOAA satellite imagery that shows the depression's development over three days.

On Oct. 21 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, Tropical Depression 13L was born about 650 miles/1,045 km east-southeast of Bermuda near 28.0 north and 55.1 west. It had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph/55 kph and some strengthening is expected. Tropical Depression 13L is moving to the northeast at 8 mph/13 kph and is expected to continue for a day before turning to the east-northeast.

In a 29 second animation of GOES-East satellite imagery from Oct. 19 through 21, the formation of the depression can be seen over 600 miles east-southeast of Bermuda. The animation was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted that satellite imagery showed a long curved band of thunderstorms over the eastern semicircle of the center of circulation. There is also a small cluster of convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) on the east side of the low-level center. 

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect the depression to strengthen into a tropical storm. If it does become a tropical storm it would be named "Lorenzo."

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
Tropical Depression 13L
GOES-East image of Tropical Depression 13L on Oct. 21 at 11:45 UTC/7:45 a.m. EDT in the central Atlantic Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-51]
Youtube Override: 
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This animation of GOES-East satellite imagery from Oct. 19 through 21 shows the development of Tropical Depression 13L in the Atlantic (far right), about 650 miles east-southeast of Bermuda.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-78]
Tropical Storm Lorenzo
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Depression 13L in the Atlantic on Oct. 21 at 16:55 UTC/12:55 p.m. EDT, before it became Tropical Storm Lorenzo.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-92]
GOES image of Lorenzo
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Lorenzo on Oct. 22 at 1145 UTC/7:45 a.m. EDT as it continued strengthening in the central Atlantic Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-108]
MODIS image of Lorenzo
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the Atlantic Ocean on Oct. 22 at 14:30 UTC/10:30 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-124]
TRMM image of Lorenzo
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Lorenzo on Oct. 23 at 5 a.m. EDT at 0247 UTC and it showed some moderate rainfall (green) still occurring in the storm, despite wind shear.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-140]
GOES image of Lorenzo
On Oct. 24 at 10:15 a.m. EDT, a visible image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite showed Lorenzo as a tropical depression with good circulation, but little thunderstorm development around it.
Image Credit: 
NOAA/NRL
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[image-156]
GOES image of Lorenzo
This GOES-East satellite image shows the remnants of Tropical Storm Lorenzo east of a frontal system in the central Atlantic Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-172]
Page Last Updated: October 28th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner