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Trami (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
August 22, 2013

NASA Catches Typhoon Trami's Landfall in China [image-110]

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Trami during the time it was making landfall in eastern China and captured an infrared view of the storm.

Typhoon Trami made landfall late on Aug. 21, and the storm was captured in infrared light by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The AIRS image, taken on Aug. 21 at 17:59 UTC/1:59 p.m. EDT showed that the most powerful thunderstorms were tightly wrapped around the storm's center during landfall.

AIRS data also showed bands of powerful thunderstorms feeding into the center from the storm's west and east. The western band stretched over eastern China while the eastern band swept over Taiwan, the Taiwan Strait and South China Sea as Trami made landfall. Cloud top temperatures in those bands of thunderstorms were colder than -63F/-52 C indicating strong uplift in the typhoon. Cloud tops that cold stretched high into the troposphere had the potential to drop heavy rainfall.

Typhoon Trami made landfall in east China's Fujian Province (Thursday morning local time) with maximum sustained winds near 75 knots/86 mph/139 kph. At 2100 UTC/5 p.m. EDT on Aug. 21 it was centered near 25.8 north and 118.9 east, about 107 nautical miles west-northwest of Taipei, Taiwan. It was moving west at 15 knots/17.2 mph/27.8 kph. Trami was downgraded to a tropical storm at 5 a.m. local time, Aug. 22/5 p.m. EDT on Aug. 21, as it moved toward the Jiangxi Province.

According to China Daily, the Fujian Meteorological Center warned of flooding and mudslides. Xinhuanet.com reported that more than 6,000 people were evacuated and over 2,000 vessels were secured in the harbor before Trami approached.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final bulletin on Trami and noted that the typhoon is expected to erode due to the frictional effects of land and fully dissipate over land by the early morning hours of Aug. 23. 

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 21, 2013 - NASA Sees Typhoon Trami Passing Taiwan for China Landfall  [image-94]

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Trami's center just north of Taiwan as it headed for landfall in eastern China.

On Aug. 21 at 02:45 UTC/10:45 p.m. EDT on Aug. 20, NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard it, captured a visible image of Trami. The MODIS image showed a tight circulation center with bands of thunderstorms have wrapped more tightly into the center of circulation from the north to east to south of the center. The band of thunderstorms south of the center covers the largest area, and appears almost the same size as the center of Trami's circulation center in the MODIS image.

By 1200 UTC/8 a.m. EDT on Aug. 21, Trami's center had passed Taiwan and was in the Taiwan Strait. The Taiwan Strait is a body of water between the western side of the island nation of Taiwan and eastern China.

At 1500 UTC, Trami's center was near 26.0 north latitude and 120.5 east longitude, about 45 nautical miles/51.7 miles/83.3 km north-northwestward of Taipei, Taiwan. Trami's maximum sustained winds are near 70 knots/80 mph/`19.6 kph. Tropical-storm-force winds extend out 100 nautical miles/115 miles/185 km from the center, and northern Taiwan was experiencing them at 1500 UTC. Trami is moving to the west at 15 knots/17.2 mph/27.8 kph and is generating 28-foot/8.5 meter-high seas causing rough surf in northern Taiwan and eastern China. 

According to the China Meteorological Agency, Trami is expected to make landfall today, Aug. 21 (or early morning Aug. 22 local time) near Fuzhou, China. An Orange Typhoon Warning is in effect, and eastern Guangdong, most of Fujian, central and southern Zhejiang and Taiwan are expected to receive heavy rainfall as Typhoon Trami closes in for landfall.

Unlabeled image

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 20, 2013 - Tropical Storm Trami and Monsoon Rains Causing Flooding in the Philippines [image-78]

Tropical Storm Trami may not be making landfall in the Philippines, but it was close enough to bring heavy rainfall when combined with monsoon rains. NASA's Aqua satellite captured those extensive rains in an infrared image when it passed overhead from space.

Tropical Storm Trami enhanced rainfall from the monsoon, and caused flooding in the northern Philippines, including Manila, the capital city. The northern Philippines were hit with two nights of heavy rainfall, but Trami is now moving to the northwest and away from the northern Philippines. According to reports from the Associated Press, many roadways were flooded. A report from Malaysia's Star on-line noted that three people were killed and two were missing as a result of the flooding.  

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument known as AIRS that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Trami's cold clouds combined with rainfall from the monsoon on Aug. 20 at 05:05 UTC/1:05 a.m. EDT. Clouds and showers from the combination blanketed the northern half of the Philippines and dropped heavy rainfall.

Two declarations of "state of calamity" have been issued as a result of heavy rainfall and flooding, according to the Star-online. Those areas include the Cavite province, southwest of Manila, and the town of Santa Rosa in the Laguna province.

On Aug. 20 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Trami had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots/69 mph/111 kph. It was centered near 23.6 north and 125.6 east, about 211 nautical miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Trami is moving to the west at 12 knots/13.8 mph/22.2 kph and is expected to become a typhoon before making landfall in northern Taiwan tomorrow, Aug. 21.

After Trami moves across extreme northern Taiwan it is expected to make a final landfall in eastern China.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 19, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Trami U-Turning [image-51]

Tropical Storm Trami appears to be a very large storm in infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite. In a NASA image, Trami appears to be about two-thirds the size of the Philippines. Satellite data also indicates that the massive storm is now making a U-turn in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, from a southeastern path to a northwestern path.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Trami on Aug. 18, the AIRS instrument aboard captured an infrared image that showed a large area of thunderstorm activity within the storm. The Aqua satellite passed over Trami at 17:29 UTC/1:29 p.m. EDT on Aug. 18. Aqua's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument looked at the storm in an infrared light. The infrared data showed the coldest cloud top temperatures circled the center of the storm and were in a strong band of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the southwest. Trami continued to show the same organization on Aug. 19.

Multispectral satellite imagery on Aug. 19 revealed that the low-level center has been consolidating. Whenever a storm consolidates, it typically means that it can spin faster and winds increase.  Data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program polar orbiting satellites showed a near-complete eye-wall, and confirmed the strong band of thunderstorms over Trami's southern semi-circle.

At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Trami was located about 391 nautical miles south of Kadena Air Base near 20.3 north and 128.4 west. Trami was moving slowly to the northeast at 4 knots/4.6 mph/7.4 kph. Maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 kph.

Trami is expected to cross northern Taiwan as a typhoon on Aug. 21 before making a final landfall in southeastern China.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
AIRS image of Trami
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Trami on Aug. 18 it looked at the storm in an infrared light and saw coldest cloud top temperatures and strong thunderstorms (purple) around the center and in a band of thunderstorms south of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-51]
AIRS image of Trami
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Trami (purple) on Aug. 20 at 05:05 UTC/1:05 a.m. EDT when it was blanketing the northern half of the Philippines and dropping heavy rainfall.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL
Image Token: 
[image-78]
MODISimage of Trami
At 10:45 p.m. EDT on Aug. 20, NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Trami on its approach to China and Taiwan.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-94]
AIRS image of Trami
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this infrared image of Typhoon Trami's landfall on Aug. 21 at 1:59 p.m. EDT. It showed that the most powerful thunderstorms (purple) were tightly wrapped around the storm's center during landfall.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-110]
Page Last Updated: August 22nd, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner