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Tapah (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
May 1, 2014

[image-110]Tapah Downgrades to a Depression

Tapah was downgraded from a tropical storm to a tropical depression and is located 239 nautical miles southeast of Iwo To.  Tapah rapidly dissipated due to the effected of strong vertical windshear from the west and a sharp decreased in sea surface temperature.  The storm is currently tracking northwest at 10 knots per hour and is expected to recurve to the northeast and accelerate.  Maximum wave height is currently 10 feet.  The storm will be monitored for signs of regeneration. 

NASA captured this image of the storm with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on April 29, 2014 at 11:55 p.m. EDT (3:55 UTC) in the western Pacific Ocean.

Text credit: Lynn Jenner
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 


[image-94]Apr. 30, 2014 - Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Clouds Filling Tropical Storm Tapah's Eye

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP passed over Tapah and captured a visible image of the storm that gave a hint of weakening as clouds began to fill its eye. On April 30 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Tapah continued to weaken as wind shear began to increase and the storm moved toward cooler waters in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Tapah on April 30 and the VIIRS instrument aboard captured a visible image of the storm as it weakened from a typhoon to a tropical storm. The imagery showed that Tapah's eye was becoming cloud filled, but powerful thunderstorms circled the center of the storm.

Tapah's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots/63.2 mph/101.9 kph as it moved to the north-northwest at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Tapah to curve to the northeast as it moves around a ridge of high pressure later today and tomorrow (May 1). Tapah was centered near 19.4 north latitude and 147.1 east longitude, about 457 nautical miles southeast of Iwo To, Japan.
 
Tapah is expected to become extra-tropical within a day or two as it nears Iwo To.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]Apr. 29, 2014 - Tapah Through Infrared Satellite Eyes: Now a Typhoon

Tropical Storm Tapah strengthened since April 28 and early on April 29, the storm reached typhoon strength. From its orbit in space, NASA's Aqua satellite zoomed over Tapah and the AIRS instrument captured infrared data on the storm that showed the location of its strongest thunderstorms.

The U.S. National Weather Service in Guam noted that a tropical storm warning and a typhoon watch continues for Alamagan and Pagan. For details on the advisory, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/data/GUM/HLSPQ1

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite collected infrared data on Typhoon Tapah on April 29 at 03:47 UTC (April 28 at 11:47 p.m. EDT). A false-colored image was created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. showing the temperature data gathered by AIRS. The data showed that there were strong thunderstorms with cold cloud-top temperatures near -63F/-52C around the center of Tapah's circulation and to the east of the center where bands of thunderstorms were wrapping into the center.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center also looked at animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery and a microwave image and both showed that the convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) had weakened slightly during the morning hours (Eastern Daylight Time/U.S.) of April 29.  Both sets of data confirmed the AIRS data and also showed bands of thunderstorms remained tightly wrapped into the low level center.  

Tapah reached typhoon strength today, April 29, when maximum sustained winds were near 65 knots (75 mph/120 kph). At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Typhoon Tapah was centered near 17.6 north latitude and 147.2 east longitude, about 151 nautical miles (173.8 miles/279.7 km) northeast of Saipan. Tapah has tracked northward at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

Tapah is expected to continue on a northwesterly path for a couple days until turning to the northeast around a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure. Tapah is expected to weaken and curve northeast before reaching Iwo To. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Tapah to move into cooler waters and an area of increasing vertical wind shear over the next couple of days which are expected to weaken the storm quickly after a couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Apr. 28, 2014 - Newborn Tropical Storm Tapah Threatens Saipan and Tinian

A tropical storm warning is in force for Saipan and Tinian as Tropical Storm Tapah moves north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on April 28. When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and, imagery revealed a developing eye in Tapah.

In addition to the tropical storm warning, a typhoon watch is in effect for Alamagan and Pagan as Tapah is expected to continue in a generally northerly direction over the next couple of days. A typhoon watch means typhoon force winds of 74 mph or greater are possible within 48 hours. A tropical storm warning means tropical storm force winds of 39 mph to 73 mph are possible within 24 hours.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tapah as it passed overhead on April 28 at 03:21 UTC (April 27 at 11:21 p.m. EDT) and the VIIRS instrument aboard captured a visible image that showed an eye surrounded by bands of thunderstorms around the center of circulation, and a large band of thunderstorms wrapping around the eastern quadrant and spiraling into the center.

On April 28 at 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Tapah had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 kph. It was centered near 14.2 north latitude and 147.4 east longitude, about 121 nautical miles/139 miles/224 km east of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Tapah is moving north at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects a turn to the northwest. The storm is expected to strengthen into a typhoon sometime on April 29.

According to the National Weather Service bulletin in Guam, Tropical Storm Tapah is expected to intensify...possibly reaching typhoon intensity this evening (April 29, 2 a.m. local time, Guam) before beginning a gradual weakening trend Wednesday. For local bulletins for Guam, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/guam/cyclone.php

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Tapah Northwestern Pacific
When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Tapah on April 28 imagery revealed a developing eye surrounded by a thick band of thunderstorms.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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Typhoon Tapah
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Tapah on April 29 at 03:47 UTC and saw strong thunderstorms with cold cloud-top temperatures near -63F/-52C (purple) around the center of circulation and east of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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NPP image of Tapah
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Tapah on April 30 and the VIIRS instrument aboard captured this visible image of the storm as it weakened from a typhoon to a tropical storm.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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MODIS image of Tapah
Aqua captured this image of the tropical depression Tapah on April 29, 2014 at 11:55 p.m. EDT (3:55 UTC) in the western Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard's MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Page Last Updated: May 1st, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner