LOADING...
Text Size
NASA's SDO Observes a Lunar Transit
July 28, 2014

[image-65]
› View 304 wavelength larger,   View 171 wavelength larger,   › View blended larger
 

[image-128]On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO's point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.
 

Max Gleber
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Image Credit: 
NASA/SDO
Image Token: 
[image-36]
By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun.
By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SDO
Image Token: 
[image-65]
The lunar transit of the sun as seen by the SDO spacecraft in 304 wavelength.
The lunar transit of the sun as seen by the SDO spacecraft in 304 wavelength.
Image Token: 
[image-79]
The lunar transit of the sun as seen by the SDO spacecraft in 171 wavelength.
The lunar transit of the sun as seen by the SDO spacecraft in 171 wavelength.
Image Token: 
[image-95]
On July 26, 2014, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory — which keeps a 24-hour watch on the sun — captured this image of the sun as the moon was passing by, briefly blocking the observatory’s view.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SDO/Duberstein
Image Token: 
[image-51]
Animated GIF Override: 
This animated gif shows the path of the moon across the Solar Dynamics Observatory's field of view for this lunar transit.
This animated gif shows the path of the moon across the Solar Dynamics Observatory's field of view for this lunar transit.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SDO team
Image Token: 
[image-128]
Image Token: 
[image-62]
Page Last Updated: July 28th, 2014
Page Editor: Holly Zell