LOADING...
Text Size
Raymond (Eastern Pacific)
October 30, 2013

NASA Eyes a "Decoupled" Tropical Depression Raymond [image-252]

Satellite data shows that the lower level circulation of Raymond decoupled from the middle layer of the storm. When a Tropical Depression decouples, it means the layers of circulation in the atmosphere are no longer "stacked" on top of each other. NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Raymond that showed the strongest storms, associated with a mid-level circulation center, had broken away from the center.

Think of a tropical cyclone as having several layers of circulation, a lower level, mid-level and upper level. When one of those levels is pushed away from the others, much like pushing the middle of a haystack, the storm weakens. That's what has happened to Raymond.

On Oct. 29 at 4:59 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Raymond, still a tropical storm and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured an infrared image. The AIRS images revealed that the coldest cloud top temperatures, and highest, strongest storms were pushed away from the center of circulation. AIRS data also showed some high clouds associated with Raymond were streaming to the east-northeast and over the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. The image of the AIRS infrared data was created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

Tropical Storm Raymond weakened to a depression early on Oct. 30 and is expected to dissipate later in the day.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Raymond decoupled over the night of Oct. 29. Satellite data shows that the low-level center was a couple of hundred nautical miles to the southwest the mid-level circulation that includes an area of strong convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone). Microwave satellite data also showed that Raymond has elongated, which is another sign of weakening.  

To make matters worse for Raymond, its moving into cooler sea surface temperatures and running into dry air - two more factors that will sap its strength.

On Oct. 30 at 5 a.m. EDT/0900 UTC, Tropical Depression Raymond's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph/55 kph and it was weakening. The center of the depression was located near latitude 19.6 north and longitude 115.7 west, about 440 miles/705 km west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Raymond was moving toward the northeast near 6 mph/9 kph and is expected to turn north while degenerating to a remnant low pressure area.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 29, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Raymond Fading Fast [image-236]

Satellite data showed some recent convective activity within Tropical Storm Raymond on Oct. 28 but southwesterly wind shear and cooler ocean temperatures are predicted by the National Hurricane Center to weaken the tropical storm to a remnant low on Wednesday October 30, 2013.

Raymond contained rainfall only in an area northwest of its center of circulation when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed above on October 28, 2013 at 2337 UTC/4:37 p.m. PDT. Rainfall data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) were combined with a visible and infrared image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS) to provide an analysis of the storm. The analysis revealed that the maximum rainfall intensity associated with Raymond was only about 33.6mm/~1.3 inches per hour. The TRMM satellite is managed by NASA and JAXA.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Tropical Storm Raymond's maximum sustained winds were down to near 50 mph/85 kph on Oct. 29 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC. Raymond's center was located near latitude 18.3 north and longitude 116.9 west, about 555 miles/890 km southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Raymond was moving slowly at 6 mph/9 kph, and is expected to slow more as it weakens over cooler waters tonight, Oct. 29. The NHC expects Raymond to become a remnant low in a day or so.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 28, 2013 - An Eye-Opener:  NASA Sees Hurricane Raymond Reborn For a Brief Time [image-204][image-220]

Tropical Storm Raymond moved away from western Mexico and into warmer waters with less wind shear over the weekend of Oct. 26-27, where it strengthened into a hurricane again. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an eye-opening image of Raymond before it ran into strong wind shear.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Raymond that showed its eye had re-developed and opened after it re-strengthened in the Eastern Pacific. The image was taken on Oct. 27 at 21:15 UTC/5:15 p.m. EDT.

By Oct. 28, wind shear had again kicked up again and Raymond was weakening. Wind shear increased from the southwest pushing the strongest convection, and showers and thunderstorms northeast of the center.

An infrared, false-colored image of Hurricane Raymond was taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 28 at 9:23 UTC/5:23 a.m. EDT. The AIRS infrared image showed that the strongest storms had been displaced to the northeast of the center as a result of southwesterly wind shear. Those strong storms were still showing cold cloud top temperatures in excess of -63F/-52C indicating they were high in the troposphere and had the potential to generate heavy rain.

At 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, Hurricane Raymond's maximum sustained winds were near 85 mph/140 kph and weakening. The center of Hurricane Raymond was near latitude 16.4 north and longitude 117.0 west, about 645 miles/1,035 km southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California. Raymond was moving toward the north near 7 mph/11 kph and is expected to turn toward the north-northeast. Raymond is forecast to weaken to a tropical storm late on Oct. 28 and a depression later that day.  

The National Hurricane Center noted on Oct. 28 that Raymond is moving into an area with stronger wind shear, cooler sea surface temperatures and drier air: three factors that will lead to its dissipation in the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 25, 2013 - Mexico Does Not Love Raymond, NASA Sees Weaker Storm [image-188]

South-central Mexico was inundated with heavy rains from Hurricane Raymond during the week of Oct. 20, and Raymond has finally weakened to a tropical storm and is moving away from the coast. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that the heaviest rainfall in the weaker storm was now away from the Mexican coast.

On Oct. 24 at 20:35 UTC/4:35 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Raymond. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of Raymond's cloud top temperatures, showing the coldest, strongest storms that pack the heaviest rainfall had finally moved off-shore. The cloud top temperatures in those strong storms were as cold as -63F/-52C and appeared elongated and somewhat fragmented indicating that Raymond had weakened.

Raymond's rainfall was totaled using data from NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite, from October 15 to 23, 2013. Rainfall totals were greater than 350mm/ ~13.8 inches along the coast northwest of Acapulco. TRMM data showed that extreme rainfall amounts of over 560mm/~22 inches fell in the open waters of the Pacific where Raymond was stalled.

Although Raymond weakened on Oct. 24 and early on Oct. 25, forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect Raymond to move into a more favorable environment over the next couple of days and again reach hurricane status, but over open ocean. By Oct. 31, Halloween, Raymond is expected to move over cooler waters and weaken again.

On Oct. 25 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Raymond's maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph/85 kph. It was centered near latitude 14.2 north and longitude 108.5 west, about 435 miles/695 km southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Raymond was moving to the west at 10 mph, and is expected to continue in that direction over the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 24, 2013 - NASA Analyzes Hurricane Raymond's Copious Rainfall [image-172]

Powerful hurricane Raymond, located off Mexico's south-central Pacific coast, weakened to a tropical storm and has dropped a lot of rain over central western Mexico's coast. NASA's TRMM satellite measured rainfall from space and that data was used to create a rainfall total map.

Raymond has now started to move slowly away from the location where it has been parked since Monday October 21, 2013. Raymond dropped abundant rainfall in much of the same area already hit by deadly flooding and landslides with Hurricane Manuel in September.

The rainfall analysis above was made at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite or TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation data (TMPA) collected during the period from October 15 to 23, 2013. Rainfall totals greater than 125mm/~4.9 inches occurred in the coastal area northeast of Raymond. The analysis also indicates that rainfall totals were greater than 350mm/ ~13.8 inches along the coast northwest of Acapulco. During the past week extreme rainfall amounts of over 560mm/~22 inches fell in the open waters of the Pacific where Raymond was stalled.

On Oct. 24 at 5 a.m. EDT/0900 UTC, Tropical Storm Raymond had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph/75 kph. Raymond is expected to strengthen a little over the next couple of days. Its center was located near latitude 14.7 north and longitude 105.3 west, about 305 miles/490 km south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Raymond is moving toward the west near 8 mph/13 kph and is expected to continue during the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1003 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Raymond to continue moving away from Mexico on a westward track.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce
SSAI/ NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 23, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Raymond Finally Moving Away from Mexico [image-140][image-156]

Satellite data revealed that Raymond, formerly a hurricane, now a tropical storm is finally moving away from the coast of south-central Mexico.

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Raymond over Mexico on Oct. 22 at 1:50 p.m. EDT when it was still a hurricane. On Oct. 23, at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed that Raymond had moved slightly away from the Mexican coast. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Microwave satellite imagery revealed today that Raymond has finally started to move away from coastal Mexico and head in a west-southwesterly direction. Satellite imagery also showed that a remnant mid-level circulation is now located northeast of the low-level center. Whenever the circulations at different levels of the atmosphere don't stack up, the storm's spin is affected. Imagery also showed that there was little build-up of thunderstorms near the center today, which is another indication the storm was weakening.

Despite weakening to a tropical storm, Raymond is still expected to drop more rain on the already drenched Mexican state of Guerrero today. Another 1 to 2 inches of rain, with isolated totals to 15 inches are possible. Meanwhile, as Raymond continues to linger off the coast, ocean swells continue to create large and dangerous waves along Mexico's south-central coast.

On Oct. 23, at 11 a.m. EDT, the center of Tropical Storm Raymond was located near latitude 15.4 north and longitude 103.0 west. That's about 185 miles/295 km south-southwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 60 mph/95 kph and the National Hurricane Center noted that some additional weakening is possible over the next couple of days. 

Raymond is moving toward the west-southwest near 8 mph/13 kph and is expected to continue in that direction over the next two days, taking the storm farther away from the coast.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center 


Oct. 22, 2013 - NASA Sees Hurricane Raymond Re-Soaking Mexican Coast [image-94][image-110][image-126]

A month ago Hurricane Manuel caused landslides and extensive flooding along Mexico's Pacific Ocean coast. Recently formed Hurricane Raymond is expected to cause heavy rainfall in nearly the same area. NASA's TRMM satellite measured the rate of heavy rainfall that Raymond was generating over the Mexican coast.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew directly above hurricane Raymond on Oct. 21 at 0111 UTC/Oct. 20 at 6:11 p.m. PDT). TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data from that orbit shows that Hurricane Raymond contained towering thunderstorms on the western side of the eye wall that were reaching to heights above 15 km/~9.3 miles.

TRMM PR also recorded precipitation in Raymond's eye wall that was falling at a rate of over 153 mm/~5.6 inches per hour and returning radar reflectivity values greater than 53dBZ to the satellite. Rain was shown by TRMM to be falling at a rate of over 30 mm /~1.2 inches per hour along Mexico's coast.

On Oct. 22, the heavy rain continued along the southwestern coast of Mexico, and warnings were still in effect. The following warnings and watches were in effect on Oct. 22, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC): a Hurricane Warning is in effect for Tecpan de Galeana to Lazaro Cardenas; a Hurricane Watch is in effect for Acapulco to Tecpan de Galeana; and a Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Acapulco to Tecpan de Galeana.

In short, what those warnings mean is hurricane-force and tropical-storm-force winds in the warning areas, accompanied by heavy rainfall, dangerous storm surges, riptides, heavy surf, and coastal flooding.

The heavy rainfall that TRMM observed is affecting the coast. The National Hurricane Center expects Raymond to generate between 4 and 8 inches with isolated totals up to 12 inches over the Mexican states of Guerrero and Michoachan. As with rainfall this heavy, flash flooding and mudslides can occur.

As of 8 a.m. EDT on Oct. 22, a weather station near Acapulco, Mexico reported 7.63 inches/194 mm of rain in the previous 48 hours and it was still raining.

By 11 a.m. EDT, Raymond's maximum sustained winds were near 105 mph/165 kph. Raymond's center was located near latitude 16.5 north and longitude 101.9 west. That puts the center of the storm about 85 miles/135 km south-southwest of Zihuatanejo and 135 miles/220 km west-southwest of Acapulco. Raymond was stationary for hours during the morning of Oct. 22, and the storm is expected to move slowly and erratically, and possibly closer to the coast before moving west-southwest on Oct. 23.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 


Oct. 21, 2013 - NASA Sees Major Hurricane Raymond Lashing Western Mexico [image-51][image-78]

Low pressure System 96E developed quickly over the weekend of Oct. 19 and 20 and by Oct. 21 had grown into Hurricane Raymond. Before Raymond exploded into a major hurricane NASA's Terra satellite flew overhead from space and NOAA's GOES satellite provided images of Raymond as a major hurricane.

On Oct. 19 at 11 p.m. EDT, System 96E organized into Tropical Depression 17-E about 205 miles/330 km south of Acapulco, Mexico. By 5 a.m. EDT on Oct. 20, the depression strengthen into Tropical Storm Raymond. 

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Raymond on Oct. 20 at 1800 UTC/2 p.m. EDT when it was a tropical storm off the coast of southwestern Mexico. The visible image was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument and showed that clouds associated with Raymond's northern quadrant were streaming over mainland Mexico, despite the center being over open water. Six hours later, Raymond reached hurricane strength with maximum sustained winds near 75 mph/120 kph.

On Oct. 21 Hurricane warnings and watches were in effect as Raymond brought heavy rains, gusty winds and rough seas to western Mexico.

A Hurricane Warning was posted from Tecpan De Galeana to Lazaro Cardenas, while a Hurricane Watch was in effect from Acapulco to Tecpan De Galeana. In addition, a Tropical Storm Warning was In effect from Acapulco to Tecpan De Galeana.

At 8 a.m. EDT/1200 UTC, Hurricane Raymond's maximum sustained winds were around 120 mph/195 kph making it a major hurricane. A "major hurricane" is a storm reaching Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale that measures hurricane intensity.  Some strengthening is possible during the next day or so, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Raymond's center or eye was located near latitude 16.2 north and longitude 102.3 west, about 115 miles/185 km south-southwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico. That's also about 165 miles/265 km west-southwest of Acapulco.

Raymond is crawling northward at 2 mph/4 kph, which means a longer lashing of coastal Mexico. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Raymond will continue to drift northward and closer to the coast today.  

NOAA's GOES-West satellite took an infrared image of Hurricane Raymond on Oct. 21 at 1200 UTC/8 a.m. EDT when it was a major hurricane and it was lashing western Mexico. The image clearly showed Raymond's eye. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NASA's GOES Project created the image using data from the NOAA satellite.

In addition to hurricane-force winds, storm surge accompanied by large and destructive waves is expected to produce significant coastal flooding in areas of onshore flow within the warning areas.  Rainfall expected from the storm is forecast to be between 2 to 4 inches with isolated amounts up to 8 inches over the Mexican state of Guerrero and Michoacan. For updated warnings and watches visit the National Hurricane Center webpage: www.nhc.noaa.gov.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
Hurricane Raymond
NASA's Terra satellite flew over Raymond on Oct. 20 at 2 p.m. EDT and saw clouds associated with Raymond's northern quadrant were streaming over mainland Mexico, despite the center being over open water.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-51]
Hurricane Raymond
This infrared image of Hurricane Raymond was taken on Oct. 21 at 1200 UTC/8 a.m. EDT when it was a major hurricane and it was lashing western Mexico.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-78]
Hurricane Raymond
On Oct. 21 at 20:10 UTC/4:10 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Hurricane Raymond battering the southwestern coast of Mexico.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-94]
TRMM image of Raymond
On Oct. 21, NASA's TRMM satellite saw some of the thunderstorms in Hurricane Raymond were as high as 15 km/9.3 miles on its western side. Red areas also indicate heavy rainfall rates. See video below.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-110]
Youtube Override: 
L4q7Edq9Zgg
TRMM video described above.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-126]
GOES image of Lorenzo
On Oct. 23, at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed that Raymond had moved slightly away from the Mexican coast.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-140]
MODIS image of Raymond
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Raymond over Mexico on Oct. 22 at 1:50 p.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-156]
TRMM rainfall map
TRMM rainfall map from Oct. 15-23 shows rainfall totals greater than 125mm/~4.9 inches (red) northeast of Raymond's center. More than 350mm/ ~13.8 inches (red) fell along the coast northwest of Acapulco. Over 560mm/~22 inches (purple) fell over open waters.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-172]
TRMM image  of Raymond
On Oct. 24 at 4:35 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Raymond and captured this infrared image of cloud top temperatures, showing the coldest (purple), strongest storms that pack the heaviest rainfall had finally moved off-shore.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-188]
Hurricane Raymond
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Hurricane Raymond, re-strengthened in the Eastern Pacific. The image was taken on Oct. 27 at 21:15 UTC/5:15 p.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-204]
AIRS image of Raymond
This infrared, false-colored image of Hurricane Raymond was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 28 at 9:23 UTC/5:23 a.m. EDT and it showed that the strongest storms (purple) had been displaced to the northeast from wind shear.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-220]
AIRS image of Raymond
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Depression 29W on Oct. 29 at 04:23 UTC/12:23 a.m. EDT and saw strong thunderstorms (purple) west and east of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-236]
Tropical Depression Raymond
On Oct. 29 at 4:59 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Raymond, still a tropical storm and captured this infrared image of cloud top temperatures, showing the coldest (purple), strongest storms away from its center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-252]
Page Last Updated: October 30th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner