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Odile (Eastern Pacific)
September 22, 2014

[image-266]NASA's TRMM Satellite Tallies Hurricane Odile's Heavy Rainfall

During the week of Sept. 15, Hurricane Odile and its weakened remnants produced heavy rainfall that caused dangerous flooding over Mexico's Baja California peninsula and southwestern United States. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite gathers data on rainfall that was used to create a map that showed estimated totals that in one case neared almost three feet!

Some of Odile's may have been welcomed in the U.S. Southwest where some areas have been experiencing extreme to exceptional drought conditions, but some was extreme and led to flooding.

TRMM was launched in November 1997 with the primary mission of measuring rainfall in the Tropics using a combination of passive microwave and active radar sensors. It is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

A rainfall analysis was created using real-time TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data produced at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Those data are used to monitor rainfall over the global Tropics.

TMPA rainfall totals from September 9 through 19, 2014 were gathered during the period when Hurricane Odile formed over the eastern Pacific Ocean southwest of Mexico, hit Baja California and when the dissipating tropical cyclone was spreading rainfall over the southwestern United States.  The heaviest rainfall during this period was found in the ocean off southwestern Mexico where Odile and other tropical cyclones have recently formed. In that area, rainfall totals reached up to 840 mm (33 inches) , almost three feet!

Rainfall along Mexico's Baja California Peninsula were over a foot. TRMM data showed rainfall totals above 320 mm (12.5 inches) there. The TRMM analysis showed that in southwestern United States Odile's remnants produced the highest rainfall totals of over 160 mm (6.3 inches) in northwestern Texas.

Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-250]Sept. 19, 2014 - NASA, NOAA Satellites Shows Odile's Remnant Romp Through Southern U.S.

Former Hurricane Odile may be a bad memory for Baja California, but the remnants have moved over New Mexico and Texas where they are expected to bring rainfall there. NASA's TRMM satellite measured Odile's heavy rainfall rates on Sept. 18, and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the former storm continue to linger over the U.S. Southwest on Sept. 19.

The remnants of Hurricane Odile were dropping heavy rain in the area from southern Arizona to western Texas when NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew over on September 18, 2014 at 0723 UTC (00:20 PDT). Some rain was found by TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument to be falling at a rate of over 111 mm (4.4 inches) per hour in one downpour east of El Paso, Texas. A 3-D look with TRMM PR found that a few thunderstorm tops were pushing to heights above 13 km (8 miles) that were dropping heavy rainfall. 

The GOES-West infrared image was taken on Sept. 19 at 11:15 UTC (7:15 a.m. EDT) showed a large area of clouds associated with the remnants over New Mexico and Texas. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The National Weather Service (NWS) cautioned on the morning of Sept. 18 that heavy rainfall from the remnants of Odile will continue to impacts parts of New Mexico and Texas into the early weekend (Sept. 20-21).

Odile's remnant center is expected to keep moving eastward into New Mexico and then western Texas through the early weekend. NWS noted "Moderate rainfall with pockets of heavier rainfall will continue to increase the flash flood threat for a large portion of New Mexico and West Texas. Expect the rainfall to begin tapering off from west to east across New Mexico Friday night and West Texas into Saturday."

Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-234] [image-77]NASA Looks Twice at Former Hurricane Odile's Rainfall

The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission observatory analyzed rainfall rates on Hurricane Odile as it made landfall in Mexico.  At this point, Hurricane Odile is category 2 with maximum sustained winds at 98 miles per hour (mph) and gusts reaching 121 mph. Odile caused major damage to several Mexican beach resorts including Cabo San Lucas, and has the potential to cause flash flooding as far as Phoenix, Arizona.

NASA-JAXA's GPM Satellite Captures Hurricane Odile's Rainfall

On September 15, 2014 the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over Hurricane Odile as it made landfall on the Baja peninsula. At that point, Hurricane Odile is category 3 with maximum sustained winds at 116 miles per hour (mph) and gusts reaching 135 mph. Odile caused major damage to several Mexican beach resorts including Cabo San Lucas, and had the potential to cause flash flooding from thunderstorms as far as Phoenix, Arizona.

The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the location and intensity of rain and snow, which defines a crucial part of the storm structure – and how it will behave. The GPM Microwave Imager sees through the tops of clouds to observe how much and where precipitation occurs, and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar observes precise details of precipitation in 3-dimensions.

For forecasters, GPM's microwave and radar data are part of the toolbox of satellite data, including other low Earth orbit and geostationary satellites that they use to monitor tropical cyclones and hurricanes.

The addition of GPM data to the current suite of satellite data is timely. Its predecessor precipitation satellite, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, is 18 years into what was originally a three-year mission. GPM's new high-resolution microwave imager data and the unique radar data ensure that forecasters and modelers won't have a gap in coverage. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. All GPM data products can be found at NASA Goddard's Precipitation Processing Center website.

NOAA's GOES-West Sees Odile's Rainy Remnants Over Southwestern U.S.

As Odile weakened, it moved north into the southwestern U.S. where it was on September 18. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the clouds associated with the remnant low pressure area that has triggered flood and flash flood watches, warnings and advisories for east central and southeastern Arizona, the southern half of New Mexico and portions of extreme western Texas.

The clouds associated with Odile's remnants covered the U.S. southwest in an image taken at 14:15 UTC (10:15 a.m. EDT) from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. The image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center that the center of Odile on Sept. 18 at 4 a.m. EDT was located near latitude 31.5 north and longitude 110.0 west. Maximum sustained winds are near 25 mph (40 kph). The remnant circulation of Odile continues to move eastward across extreme southeastern Arizona.

Radar data on the ground has shown that rain is falling mostly east of the circulation center across southeastern Arizona, southern New Mexico and western Texas. Some of the rainfall was moderate or heavy. Heavy rains are expected to reach eastern New Mexico by later today and the Texas Panhandle by early Friday morning.

The low-level circulation is expected to dissipate later in the day on Sept. 18, but the rain will continue through Friday.

For additional imagery of Hurricane Odile from the GPM satellite, visit:   http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=4213

Alex Kekesi / Gail Skofronick Jackson/Dalia B Kirschbaum / George Huffman / Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-188][image-204]Sept. 17, 2014 - NASA Sees Odile Soaking Mexico and Southwestern U.S.

Tropical Storm Odile continues to spread moisture and generate strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall over northern Mexico's mainland and the Baja California as well as the southwestern U.S. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates from space as it passed over Odile.

Odile had weakened to a tropical storm with winds of about 55 knots (63.3 mph) when the TRMM satellite flew over on September 16, 2014 at 0917 UTC (2:19 a.m. PDT). Odile was still well organized and TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) measured rain falling at a rate of almost 130 mm (5.1 inches) per hour northeast of the tropical storm's center of circulation. The tops of some strong thunderstorms over the Gulf of California were reaching heights of 13km (8 miles).

On Sept. 17, Odile is weakening as it moves slowly northeastward across the northern Gulf of California while dropping heavy rainfall over portions of northwestern Mexico and the southwestern United States. A Tropical Storm Warning remained in effect for mainland Mexico from Bahia Kino to Puerto Penasco.

At 11 a.m. EDT on Sept. 17, the center of Tropical Storm Odile was located near latitude 30.6 north and longitude 113.3 west, about 50 miles (85 km) south-southeast of Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Odile is moving toward the northeast near 6 mph (9 kph). On the forecast track the center of Odile is moving into northwestern mainland Mexico. Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 kph) and rapid weakening is expected as Odile moves over the mainland.   

Tropical storm-force winds and heavy amounts of rainfall have been recorded today, Sept. 17. The National Hurricane Center noted that a wind gust to 41 mph (66 kph) was reported at Caborca in the Mexican state of Sonora during the morning hours. A rainfall total of 2.57 inches (62 mm) was observed at Caborca, Mexico.

The heavy rain that TRMM was measuring is expected to continue as Odile tracks slowly over mainland Mexico. Moisture ahead of Odile is expected to produce rainfall amounts of 3 to 6 inches with isolated totals of 9 inches across southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico, possibly extending into western Texas through Friday, September 19.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 


[image-156][image-172]Sept. 16, 2104 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Odile Knocking at U.S. Southwest

Tropical Storm Odile continues to drench western Mexico and has now entered into the U.S. Southwest. On September 15, NASA's Terra satellite saw Odile's northernmost edge crossing the Mexican border into southern California. NOAA's GOES-East satellite on September 16 showed Odile's outer bands were already bringing storms to southern Arizona.

NASA Sees Odile Knocking on U.S. Border

On Sept. 15 at 2:35 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite saw the northern fringes of Hurricane Odile straddling the border with southern California and Arizona. By the next day, September 16, NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw an outer band of the now weakened Tropical Storm Odile affecting Arizona.

Flood Watch in Effect for Tucson, Arizona and Surrounding Area

In the U.S., flash flood watch remains in effect from late tonight (Sept. 16) through Thursday afternoon including the greater Tucson area. The National Weather Service cautioned that the heaviest rainfall amounts will total 3 to 5 inches by late Thursday.  For details visit: www.weather.gov.

Warnings in Effect in Mexico

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the west coast of the Baja Peninsula from Puerto San Andresito to San Jose De Las Palomas and the east coast of the peninsula from Loreto to San Felipe.  In addition, a Tropical Storm Warning is up for mainland Mexico From Huatabampito to Puerto Libertad. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the west coast of the Baja Peninsula north of San Jose De Las Palomas to Cabo San Quintin.

Odile's Status on September 16

At 8 a.m. EDT on September 16, the center of Tropical Storm Odile was located near latitude 28.1 north and longitude 113.0 west. Odile was moving toward the north-northwest near 10 mph (17 kph) and a turn toward the north and north-northeast is expected later in the day. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 60 mph (95 kph) and weakening is forecast. The estimated minimum central pressure is 994 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center noted that on the forecast track, the center of Odile will continue to move over or near the east coast of the Baja California Peninsula through today...and move over the northern Gulf of California tonight and into northern mainland Mexico on Wednesday.

A visible image on Sept. 16 at 10:11 a.m. from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed Tropical Storm Odile moving over Baja California, Mexico and stretching into the southwestern U.S.

Odile is likely to become a tropical depression by early Wednesday, September 17.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-112]Sept. 15, 2014 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Hurricane Odile Strike Baja California

NASA"s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM captured data on powerful Hurricane Odile revealing heavy rainfall from powerful thunderstorms as it made landfall in Baja California. Odile tied a record for strongest hurricane to hit the Baja in over 40 years.

Odile made landfall near Cabo San Lucas at 0445 UTC (12:45 a.m. EDT) and was moving northwest along the length of the peninsula of Baja California, then northeast to the northern end of the Sea of Cortez.

TRMM passed directly above hurricane Odile on September 15, 2014 at 0344 UTC (Sept. 14 at 1:44 p.m. EDT). That was about an hour before the strong hurricane hit Baja California near Cabo San Lucas. 

[image-63][image-128]The National Hurricane Center (NHC) hurricane discussion on September 15, 2014 said, "The estimated intensity of 110 knots at landfall ties Odile with Olivia (1967) as the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the satellite era in the state of Baja California Sur."

TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR showed that Odile contained intense thunderstorms dropping rain at a rate of over 188.4 mm (about 7.4 inches) per hour in the hurricane's nearly circular eye wall.

One of the TRMM satellites most useful features has been its ability to provide vertical profiles of the rain and snow from the surface up to a height of about 12 miles (20 kilometers). At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland a simulated 3-D view of Hurricane Odile's rainfall structure was created using the satellite's radar reflectivity data. This view showed that the tops of many intense thunderstorms in Odile's eye wall were reaching heights above 12.5 km (about 7.8 miles).

By 2 p.m. EDT on September 15, Hurricane Odile's wind speeds decreased to about 90 mph (150 kph) after hitting land and winds are forecast by the NHC to slowly decrease to below hurricane force tomorrow. Odile is moving to the northwest at 13 mph (20 kph).  It was centered near 25.1 north and 111.6 west, about 45 miles (70 km) east-northeast of Cabo San Lazaro, Mexico.

Torrential rainfall is predicted to continue near the weakening system. Flash floods and landslides with rainfall totals of over 152-305 mm (6-12 inches) are predicted by the NHC as Odile travels over the Baja California Peninsula. Western Mexico is expected to feel the effects of Hurricane Odile today and tomorrow as the hurricane continues to hug the coast.  A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Baja California Sur from Punta Abreojos to Santa Rosalia. A Hurricane Watch remains in effect for the west coast of Baja California Sur from north of Punta Abreojos to Punta Eugenia. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the East Coast of the  Baja Peninsula from north of Santa Rosalia to Bahia De Los Angeles, the west coast of the Baja Peninsula from north of Punta Eugenia to San Jose De Las Palomas and mainland Mexico from Altata to Bahia Kino.

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the west coast of The Baja Peninsula North of San Jose De Las Palomas to Cabo San Quintin, the east coast of the Baja Peninsula From North of Bahia De Los Angeles to San Felipe and mainland Mexico from north of Bahia Kino to Puerto Libertad.

Although Odile continues to weaken heavy rainfall and flooding pose serious threats.

Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-96][image-80]Sept. 12, 2014 - Tropical Storm Odile Taken on by Two NASA Satellites

As Tropical Storm Odile continues to affect Mexico's west coast and stir up dangerous surf, NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites provided forecasters information on clouds and rainfall in the coast-hugging storm.  On September 12, A Tropical Storm Watch remained in effect from Manzanillo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.

Tropical Storm Odile formed on September 10, 2014 in the same area where Norbert formed.

Gathering Rainfall and Thunderstorm Height Information

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew over tropical storm Odile on September 11, 2014 at 0418 UTC (12:18 a.m. EDT) and collected rainfall data. A rainfall analysis made from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data was overlaid on an enhanced infrared image of Odile's clouds from NOAA's GOES-West satellite to show where the rain was falling within that cloud shield (or the extent of the clouds). The coupled image showed that Odile was dropping rain at the extreme rate of over 196 mm (7.8 inches) per hour in powerful thunderstorms near Odile's center of circulation.

TRMM satellite radar reflectivity (which means the satellite reads signals bounced off the clouds and back to the satellite) data was used to create a simulated 3-D view (toward the east) of Odile's rainfall structure. The 3-D image showed the most intense thunderstorms were reaching altitudes of over 14.7 km (about 9.1 miles). The release of this much energy would normally lead to intensification but northeasterly vertical wind shear was dampening Odile. By September 12, that wind shear was relaxing, which will enable Odile to strengthen.

Taking the Cloud Top Temperatures

Later on September 11, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Odile and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument provided temperature data of Odile's cloud tops. The AIRS data confirmed the TRMM data, showing the coldest cloud tops in powerful thunderstorms circling the center of the storm. The AIRS data was false-colored to better show temperature differences at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The coldest cloud tops were near -63F/-53C in storms circling Odile's center.

Odile's Location on September 12

At 8 a.m. EDT on September 12, Odile's maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph (95 kph) and some strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) advised that Odile could become a hurricane by tonight (Sept. 12). Odile's center was located near latitude 15.5 north and longitude 105.0 west. Odile is drifting toward the west near 2 mph (4 kph) and expected to move to the west-northwest and then northwest while picking up speed over the next day.

Dangerous Surf for Southwestern Mexico Over the Weekend

Odile's center is forecast will remain well offshore of the southwestern coast of Mexico through Sunday, September 14. Despite the center remaining off-shore, ocean swells are expected to affect the southwestern coast of Mexico over the next couple of days creating dangerous surf and riptides.

The NHC forecast calls for Odile to intensify into a hurricane and move in a northwesterly direction parallel to the west coast of Mexico. Odile is expected to follow close to the same track as hurricane Norbert and pass to the west of the southern tip of Baja California on Monday, September 15.

Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Sept. 11, 2014 - NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Sees Wind Shear Affecting Tropical Storm Odile

Wind shear is pushing the low-level center of circulation northeast of Tropical Storm Odile's central strong thunderstorms. That's what NOAA's GOES satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed in imagery of Tropical Storm Odile.

Early on September 11, Odile was close enough to the west coast of Mexico to generate a tropical storm watch from Lazaro Cardenas to Manzanillo, Mexico. In addition to the watch, rough surf is expected as Odile continues to parallel the coast on a track to the north. Swells from Odile are expected to begin affecting portions of the southwestern coast of Mexico in a day or so. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Odile on September 11 at 8:19 UTC (4:19 a.m. EDT) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured an infrared image of the storm as it continued moving through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The VIIRS instrument revealed that powerful thunderstorms stretching high into the troposphere with cloud top temperatures colder than -63F/-53C, were displaced from the low-level center of circulation, which was northeast of those storms.  

The National Hurricane Center noted that early morning GOES-East satellite visible images and microwave satellite imagery indicate that "the 15-20 knots of northeasterly shear continues to displace the surface circulation to the northeast of the convective canopy (thunderstorms." 

VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. VIIRS flies aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, which is managed by both NASA and NOAA.

At 11 a.m. EDT on September 11, Odile's maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph).  Odile's center was located near latitude 15.3 north and longitude 104.2 west, about 230 miles (370 km) southwest of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico. Odile is moving toward the west near 2 mph (4 kph) and NHC forecasters call for a slow westward drift or erratic motion through September 12. The estimated minimum central pressure is 999 millibars.

NHC noted that wind patterns will change in the next day allowing Odile to strengthen. In fact, the NHC noted that Odile may become a major hurricane by September 15.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36]Sept. 10, 2014 - NASA Catches Birth of Tropical Storm Odile

The Eastern Pacific Ocean continues to turn out tropical cyclones and NASA's Aqua satellite caught the birth of the fifteenth tropical depression on September 10 and shortly afterward, it strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Odile.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Depression 15-E on September 10 at 8:53 UTC (4:53 a.m. EDT) when it developed. The National Hurricane Center named the depression at 5 a.m. EDT, when the center was located near latitude 14.4 north and longitude 102.5 west.

AIRS infrared imagery reads temperature and identified the coldest temperatures in powerful thunderstorms circling the center of the newborn depression. Cloud top temperatures were near 220 kelvin (-63.6F/-53.1C). 

By 11 a.m. EDT, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Odile. Maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) and Odile was drifting toward the north-northwest near 3 mph (6 kph) and is expected to drift to the north-northwest over the next two days. Odile was located near 14.9 north latitude and 102.9 west longitude, about 220 miles (350 km) south-southwest of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico.

The National Hurricane Center noted that on the forecast track, Odile's center will remain offshore of the southwestern coast of Mexico through Thursday night, September 11. However, Odile is expected to create swells, rip currents and rough surf along the southwestern coast of Mexico over the next day or two.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Odile in the Eastern Pacific
This false-colored infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite captured the birth of Tropical Depression 15-E on September 10 at 8:53 UTC.
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NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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NASA's TRMM Satellite measured rainfall in Odile on Sept. 15. Odile contained intense thunderstorms around the eye above 12.5 km (about 7.8 miles) high dropping rain at a rate of over 188.4 mm (about 7.4 inches) per hour.
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NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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GPM satellite data shows Hurricane Odile's rainfall rates on Sept. 15, close to the eye. Shades of blue indicate frozen precipitation (upper atmosphere). Shades of green to red are liquid precipitation which extend down to the ground.
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NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio/NASA/JAXA
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VIIRS image of Odile
An infrared image on Sept. 11 at 08:19 UTC from the VIIRS instrument aboard NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite shows strong thunderstorms (yellow) with very cold cloud tops in Tropical Storm Odile.
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NRL/NOAA/NASA
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AIRS image of Odile
Later on September 11, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Odile, showing the coldest cloud tops (near -63F/-53C) i
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NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Odile
TRMM satellite flew over tropical storm Odile on Sept. 11 at 12:18 a.m. EDT and saw thunderstorms over 14.7 km (9.1 miles) high dropping rainfall over 196 mm (7.8 inches) per hour (red).
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SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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TRMM image of Odile
NASA's TRMM Satellite measured rainfall in Odile on Sept. 15. Odile contained intense thunderstorms around the eye above 12.5 km (about 7.8 miles) high dropping rain at a rate of over 188.4 mm (about 7.4 inches) per hour.
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NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from September 13 through September 15 shows Hurricane Odile's movement and landfall near Cabo San Lucas on Mexico's Baja California. TRT 0:42
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Odile
On Sept. 15 at 2:35 p.m. EDT, NASA's Terra satellite saw the northern fringes of Hurricane Odile straddling the border with southern California and Arizona.
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NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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GOES image of Odile
This visible image taken on Sept. 16 at 10:11 a.m. EDT from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows Tropical Storm Odile moving over Baja California, Mexico and stretching into the southwestern U.S.
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Odile
On Sept. 16 at 20:50 UTC (4:50 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Odile over Baja California.
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NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM image of Odile
On Sept. 16 TRMM saw rainfall rates of almost 130 mm (5.1 inches) per hour northeast of the tropical storm's center of circulation. The tops of some strong thunderstorms over the Gulf of California were reaching heights of 13km (8 miles).
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NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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GOES image of Odile
The clouds associated with Odile's remnants covered the U.S. southwest in an image taken at 14:15 UTC (10:15 a.m. EDT) from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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TRMM image of Odile
On Sept. 18, The TRMM satellite saw rain falling at a rate of over 111 mm (4.4 inches) per hour in one downpour east of El Paso, Texas. A few thunderstorm tops were pushing to heights above 13 km (8 miles) that were dropping heavy rainfall. Credit:
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NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Odile
This TRMM rainfall analysis from Sept. 9-19, 2014 shows heaviest rainfall, up to 33 inches appear in purple in the ocean off southwestern Mexico where Odile and other tropical cyclones formed. Rainfall totals above 12.5 inches near Baja California peninsula and over 6.3 in northwestern Texas.
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NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: September 22nd, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner