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Neoguri (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
July 14, 2014

[image-284]NASA Adds Up Tropical Storm Neoguri's Deluge from Space

The once-powerful Super Typhoon Neoguri weakened to a tropical storm when it dropped heavy rainfall over southern Japan during the week of July 7, 2014. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured that soaking from its orbit in space and data was used to create a maps showing the rainfall totals.

Heavy rainfall from Neoguri fell on land that was already soaked earlier this month by a slow moving seasonal frontal system. Neoguri was reported to have caused up to five deaths and 50 injuries in Japan.

Rainfall from tropical storm Neoguri also caused a large landslide in the town of Nagiso on the main island of Honshu resulting in one death and the destruction of many buildings.

A TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), produced at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, combined the rainfall estimates generated by TRMM and other satellites. The analysis showed a near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) for the period from July 1 to 11, 2014. The analysis indicated rainfall totals of over 520 mm (about 20.4 inches) near the western tip of the Japanese island of Kyushu. Neoguri's past locations and track are shown with red symbols.

Text credit:  Harold F. Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-268]July 11, 2014 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Maps Tropical Storm Neoguri's Soggy Path Through Japan

Southern Japan received a soaking from Tropical Storm Neoguri on July 9 and 10 and data from the TRMM satellite was used to create a map that shows how much rain fell in Kyushu.

Kyushu is the southwestern most and third largest island of Japan. The island is mountainous and is home to Mount Aso. Heavy rainfall from Neoguri fell on land that was already soaked in the past week from a slow moving frontal system.

Typhoon Neoguri made landfall on Kyushu early Thursday, July 10, local time after affecting the Okinawa island chain.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite is managed by both NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. TRMM acts as a rain gauge in space and can tally the amounts of rainfall from weather systems on Earth.

The TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), produced at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, combined the rainfall estimates generated by TRMM and other satellites. The analysis provided a near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) for the period from July 3-10, 2014 and indicated rainfall totals of over 490 mm (19.3 inches) for the past week fell in western Kyushi.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final bulletin on Tropical Storm Neoguri on July 10 at 15.00 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). At that time Neoguri's maximum sustained winds were near 40 knots (46.0 mph/74.0 kph). It was centered near 33.6 north latitude and 136.4 east longitude, about 131 nautical miles southwest of Camp Fuji, Japan. Neoguri was moving to the east-northeast at 19 knots (21.8 mph/35.1 kph). The storm was becoming an extra-tropical storm at the time, and completed the transition on July 11. 

Text credit:  Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-236][image-252]July 10, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Neoguri Losing Punch Along Southern Japan's Coast

Once a powerful super typhoon, now an weakening tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite saw a much weaker Tropical Storm Neoguri moving along the southern coast of Japan.

On July 10 at 0:35 UTC, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of a more disorganized Tropical Storm Neoguri over east central Japan. At the time of the image, a more elongated Tropical Storm Neoguri's center was east of Kyushu, Japan.

A visible image from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite taken July 10 at 03:59 UTC showed a more elongated Tropical Storm Neoguri off Japan's southern coast. VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans.

On July 10 at 09:00 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted that Tropical Storm Neoguri's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). Neoguri was centered near 33.8 north latitude and 135.8 east longitude, or about 127 nautical miles (146.1 miles/235.2 km) southeast of Iwakuni, Japan. Neoguri has tracked east-northeastward at 29 knots (33.3 mph/53.7 kph). Earlier in the week, when Neoguri was a super-typhoon, it was generating seas over 45 feet high (13.7 meters). Now, as a tropical storm, Neoguri is kicking up maximum wave heights near 8 feet (2.4 meters).

Radar from the Japanese Meteorological agency showed that Neoguri had an exposed low-level circulation center and the development of thunderstorms was waning. Moderate to strong southwesterly wind shear of 20 to 30 knots (23.0 to 34.5 mph/37.0 to 55.5 kph) was pushing Neoguri's thunderstorms northeast of the center of circulation.  

For current warnings from the Japan Meteorological Agency, visit: http://www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/index.html/.

The JTWC expects Neoguri to continue weakening as it tracks along the southeastern coast of Japan very near Toyko. JWTC forecasters noted that Neoguri will continue transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone as it moves into cooler waters.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-190][image-111][image-206][image-163]NASA Satellites Triple-Team a Weakening Tropical Storm Neoguri

NASA satellites continue to provide valuable data on Tropical Storm Neoguri to forecasters as it headed for a landfall in Kyushu, Japan. NASA's TRMM, Terra and Aqua satellites captured cloud and rainfall data as Neoguri weakened on its approach to Kyushu.

On July 8, 2014 at 0545 UTC (1:45 a.m. EDT), NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Neoguri when it had sustained winds near 110 knots (127 mph). At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenmbelt, Maryland, a rainfall analysis was created using data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The analysis showed that rain was falling at a rate of over 117 mm (4.6 inches) per hour in a rain band affecting Okinawa.

TRMM data was also used to create a 3-D image of the storm. That three dimensional look showed powerful thunderstorms were reaching heights above 16.3 km (about 10.1 miles) in an intense feeder band southeast of Neoguri's center. TRMM data also showed that Neoguri's eyewall was mainly intact but dry air entrainment appeared to have reduced rainfall in the southwestern side.

Later on July 8 at 12:59 p.m. EDT, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the typhoon's clouds. Cold cloud top temperatures exceeding -63F/-52.7C circled the center of circulation.

On July 9 at 02:30 UTC (July 8 at 10:30 p.m. EDT), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Neoguri approaching Kyushu, Japan. The visible image revealed that Neoguri's eye had disappeared and the center has become somewhat elongated as the storm weakened into a tropical storm.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that an upper level analysis revealed that Neoguri is now in a more harsh environment as northerly vertical wind shear increased to as much as 30 knots.   

By 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Neoguri's maximum sustained winds dropped to near 60 knots (69.0 mph/111.1 kph). Neoguri was located near 32.0 north latitude and 128.6 east longitude, about 124 nautical miles (142.7 miles/229.6 km) southwest of Sasebo, Japan. It was moving to the east-northeast at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph) and generating 25-foot (7.6 meters) high waves.  

Typhoon Neoguri is predicted to continue gradually weakening and make landfall in Kyushu and reach Sasebo by July 9 at 2000 UTC (4 p.m. EDT). Kyushu is the third largest island of Japan and is located southwest of its four main islands. The JTWC expects Neoguri to swing to the north-northeast and follow the east coast of mainland Japan, passing near Toyko late on July 10.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[image-95]July 09, 2014 - The International Space Station Captures Neoguri

Typhoon Neoguri from the International Space Station One of the Expedition 40 crew members onboard the International Space Station photographed this image of Super Typhoon Neoguri headed toward Japan at 21:58 GMT (5:58 p.m. EDT) on July 5, 2014. A Russian Progress vehicle, docked to the orbital outpost, is in the foreground.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


July 08, 2014 -Three NASA Satellites Dissect Powerful Typhoon Neoguri[image-79]

NASA's Aqua, TRMM and CloudSat dissected powerful Typhoon Neoguri as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and affected southern Japan. The three satellites gathered data on rainfall, cloud heights, cloud extent, cloud temperatures, the size of the eye, and what was happening in the eye.

Typhoon Neoguri formed in the western Pacific Ocean south-southeast of Guam on July 3, 2014. Since then Neoguri has become increasingly more powerful and dangerous. The word Neoguri means "raccoon" in Korean. On July 5 at 0426 UTC (12:26 a.m. EDT) NASA's CloudSat satellite passed over Typhoon Neoguri when its maximum sustained winds were near 110 knots (127 mph).

[image-63]CloudSat passed over the western edge of the center of the storm revealing a portion of eye and eye wall structure. CloudSat found that a canopy or covering of high, wispy cirrus clouds covered the eye, and that there was a small area of cumulus and stratocumulus clouds near the surface.

[image-96][image-110][image-142]When CloudSat passed overhead, Typhoon Neoguri had a notably large eye with meso vorticies (small scale rotational areas usually found in an intensifying tropical cyclone as was the case with Neoguri) in the inner eye.  CloudSat passed over Neoguri from northwest to southeast and cut through the center of the storm. CloudSat found a wide area of moderate to heavy rainfall and convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms) south of the eyewall and outer bands. CloudSat also provided a side view of the extent of Neoguri's clouds, and found the cirrus canopy extends hundreds of miles/kilometers outward from the center.

On July 7 at 0641 UTC (2:41 a.m. EDT) NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite had a near perfect view as it passed above the center of Typhoon Neoguri. At that time, Neoguri was classified as a category four typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale with sustained winds estimates at 135 knots (155 mph). 

Rainfall from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) revealed that Neoguri's nearly circular eye wall contained intense thunderstorms. TRMM PR found that the heaviest precipitation was occurring at a rate of over 106 mm (about 4.2) inches per hour in feeder bands southeast of Neoguri's eye.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, TRMM's Precipitation Radar data was used to create a 3-D simulated view that showed Neoguri's circular eye wall was unbroken and contained storms that were uniformly reaching heights of 13 to 15 km (8 to 9.3 miles).

On July 8 at 0500 UTC (1 a.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Neoguri when it was in the East China Sea. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm that shows some cirrus clouds in a mostly clear eye. Neoguri's center was due west of Kume Island. Kume Island is a populated volcanic island that is part of the Okinawa Islands and the Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. 

As Aqua passed over Neoguri, another instrument aboard captured infrared data on the storm's clouds and temperatures. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument found cold cloud tops in powerful thunderstorms around the eyewall (wall of thunderstorms around the storm's open center) were as cold as -70C to -80C (-94F to -112F) degrees. AIRS showed an eye that was about 25 nautical-miles (28.7 miles/46.3 km) wide.

On July 8 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Neoguri's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 105 knots. It was centered near 28.3 north latitude and 125.8 east longitude, about 379 nautical miles (436 miles/702 miles) southwest of Sasebo, Japan. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that Neoguri was moving to the north at 13 knots (14.9 mph/24.0 kph), but forecasts a change to the northeast. Neoguri is creating large and dangerous swells with wave heights to 37 feet (11.2 meters).  

The JTWC predicts Typhoon Neoguri will turn to the east and make landfall in southern Kyushu slightly after 0000 UTC on July 10 (8 p.m. EDT on July 9).

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 


July 07, 2014 - NASA Satellites See Neoguri Grow into a Super Typhoon

[image-36][image-51]From July 4 to July 7 Tropical Cyclone Neoguri strengthened from a tropical storm into a supertyphoon. NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites passed over the rapidly intensifying storm and provided forecasters with visible, infrared and microwave data on the powerful supertyphoon.

On July 4 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Neoguri had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63.2 mph/101.9 kph). It was located near 13.1 north and 141.4 east, about 207 nautical miles (238.2 miles/383.4 km) west of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. It was moving to the northwest at 13 knots (14.9 mph/24.0 kph). This visible image from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite at 03:40 UTC on July 4 showed the bulk of the clouds and showers south and east of a clear eye. 

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Neoguri as it became a typhoon on July 5. At 01:20 UTC (July 4 at 9:20 p.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer known as MODIS that flies aboard Terra captured a visible image of Neoguri as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The MODIS image showed a clear eye, and a large, thick band of thunderstorms in the southern quadrant of the storm wrapping into the center.

On July 5 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) satellite data helped confirm that Neoguri had become a typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific after it passed Guam. At that time it was centered near 16.0 north and 137.0 east, about 813 nautical miles (935.6 miles/1,506 km) southeast of Kadena Air Base. It was moving west-northwest at 14 knots (16.1 mph/25.9 kph) and had maximum sustained winds near 115 knots (132.3 mph/213.0 kph).

On July 6 Typhoon Neoguri continued to strengthen. Neoguri was located near 18.5 north and 131.4 east at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on July 6. That's about 661 nautical miles (760.7 miles/1,224 km) southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. It had maximum sustained winds near 120 knots (138.1 mph/222.2 kph) and was moving to the west-northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that Neoguri was generating very rough and high seas as high as 32 feet (9.7 meters).

A false-colored infrared image of Supertyphoon Neoguri on July 6 at 17:17 UTC (1:17 p.m. EDT) was made at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California using data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. AIRS flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The infrared imagery showed very cold, high, powerful thunderstorms around the center of Neoguri's 40-nautical-mile-wide-eye and in a thick band south of the center.

By July 7 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Neoguri had grown into a supertyphoon with maximum sustained winds near 130 knots (149.6 mph/240.8 kph). The JTWC expects Neoguri to strengthen further. Neoguri was located near 21.6 north latitude and 127.3 east longitude, about 246 nautical miles (283.1 miles/455.6 km) south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. It was moving to the northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph). As Neoguri strengthened, the ocean has become more turbulent, and JTWC estimates maximum significant wave heights near 40 feet (12.1 meters).   

Tropical storm-force winds extend 210 nautical miles (241.7 miles/388.9 km) from the center, and hurricane-force winds extend up to 60 nautical miles (69.0 miles/111.1 km) from the center. 

For a graphic of watches in warnings in effect in Japan, visit the Japan Meteorological Agency's page: http://www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/.

Neoguri is moving northwest and continuing to strengthen. The JTWC expects Neoguri to turn to the north late on July 7 (EDT) and pass Kadena Air Base. A landfall in Kyushu is expected by July 9. The JTWC noted in a July 7 discussion: by July 9, cooling sea surface temperatures, increasing vertical wind shear ahead of the mid-latitude westerlies (winds), and landfall into Kyushu, Japan, will slowly erode the system.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

MODIS image of Neoguri
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Neoguri on July 5 at 01:20 UTC (July 4 at 9:20 p.m. EDT) as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Cloudsat image of Neoguri
CloudSat passed over Typhoon Neoguri on July 5 and saw a wide area of moderate to heavy convection south of the eye in the areas of the eyewall and outer bands.
Image Credit: 
CIRA/Colorado State
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TRMM Image of Neoguri
On July 7 at 2:41 a.m. EDT the TRMM satellite had a near perfect view as it passed above the center of Typhoon Neoguri. Heaviest rainfall was occurring at over 106 mm (4.2) inches per hour in feeder bands southeast of Neoguri's eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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ISS image of Neoguri
Image of Typhoon Neoguri from the International Space Station.
Image Credit: 
NASA ISS/Image: SS040-E-038897
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On July 8, NASA's TRMM satellite saw powerful thunderstorms reaching heights above 16.3 km (about 10.1 miles) in an intense feeder band southeast Neoguri's center. Rain was falling at a rate of over 117 mm (about 4.6 inches) per hour in a rain band affecting Okinawa.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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AIRS image of Neoguri
This false-colored infrared image of Supertyphoon Neoguri was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on July 6 at 17:17 UTC (1:17 p.m. EDT). Purple indicates strongest thunderstorms. Credit:
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Heavy Rainfall in Typhoon Neoguri On July 7 at 2:41 a.m. EDT the TRMM satellite had a near perfect view as it passed above the center of Typhoon Neoguri. Heaviest rainfall was occurring at over 106 mm (4.2) inches per hour in feeder bands southeast of Neoguri's eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Neoguri
This visible image of Typhoon Neoguri in the East China Sea was taken by the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on July 8 at 0500UTC (1 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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AIRS image of Neoguri
On July 8, the AIRS instrument on Aqua found cold cloud tops in powerful thunderstorms (purple) around the eyewall as cold as -70C to -80C (-94F to -112F). AIRS showed an eye that was about 25 nautical-miles wide.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Neoguri
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Typhoon Neoguri was approaching Kyushu, Japan on July 8 at 12:59 p.m. EDT. Powerful thunderstorms appear in purple.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Neoguri
On July 8, NASA's TRMM satellite saw powerful thunderstorms reaching heights above 16.3 km (about 10.1 miles) in an intense feeder band southeast Neoguri's center. Rain was falling at a rate of over 117 mm (about 4.6 inches) per hour in a rain band affecting Okinawa.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Neoguri
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image on July 9 at 02:30 UTC (July 8 at 10:30 p.m. EDT) as Typhoon Neoguri was approaching Kyushu, Japan.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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On July 10 at 0:35 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a more disorganized Tropical Storm Neoguri over east central Japan. Neoguri's center was east of Kyushu, Japan.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Suomi NPP image of Neoguri
This visible image from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite taken July 10 at 03:59 UTC showed an elongated Tropical Storm Neoguri off Japan's southern coast.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA
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TRMM image of Neoguri
This rainfall analysis using TRMM satellite data showed that rainfall totals of over 490 mm (19.3 inches) fell in western Kyushi over the period from July 3-10, 2014.The red line indicates Tropical Storm Neoguri's track.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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TRMM shows Neoguri's rainfall pattern across Japan
A NASA TRMM satellite rainfall analysis from July 1 to 11 showed rainfall totals of over 520 mm (about 20.4 inches) near the western tip of the Japanese island of Kyushu. Neoguri's locations appear in red.
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SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: July 14th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner