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Jebi (South China Sea)
August 5, 2013

08.05.13NASA Sees Tropical Storm Jebi Make Landfall in Northern Vietnam[image-94]

Tropical Storm Jebi made its second landfall very early on Aug. 3 in northern Vietnam, north of Hanoi. NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Jebi after landfall at 1531 UTC (11:31 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 3 as the storm was tracking north of Hanoi.

At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 3 before NASA's Terra satellite passed over Jebi, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final warning on the system. It was located near 22.1 north and 105.6 east, just 56 nautical miles north-northeast of Hanoi at the time of the last bulletin. Maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots/51.7 mph/83.3 kph at that time. Jebi was moving further inland in a west-northwest direction.

According to the VietNamNet Bridge, officials from the Quang Ninh province flood and storm response department reported that as a result of the storm, there were numerous power outages, six people died, crops and 320 homes suffered damage. River levels in northern Vietnam are also rising as a result of the storm's heavy rainfall, which may lead to flooding. Jebi was the fifth tropical cyclone to affect Vietnam in 2013.

Satellite imagery showed a tightly-wrapped low-level circulation center with a central dense overcast. The interaction with land already started to weaken the system. Frictional effects over land and increasing vertical wind shear caused Jebi to dissipate by Aug. 4 after bringing rains to areas of Laos and Thailand.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
 


08.02.13 - NASA Sees Another Landfall and "Return of the Jebi"[image-78]

Like the birds called "swallows" who return, the latest tropical storm named for them has made one landfall and is returning to land again on Aug.3. Jebi is the word for swallows in South Korea and NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm after it made its first landfall.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Jebi on Aug. 2 at 1447 UTC/10:47 a.m. EDT/10:47 p.m. China local time, after it made landfall in Hainan Island, China. Jebi's center was just north of Hainan Island and extended west over the Gulf of Tonkin at the time of the image.

Xinhua news reported that Jebi made landfall in Hainan Island, China, with tropical storm-force winds near 73 mph (117 kph) in the Longlou Township, Wenchang City, at 7:30 p.m. local time.  Heavy rains and gusty winds brought sea and air travel to a standstill.

Tropical Storm Jebi's center has since moved into the Gulf of Tonkin where it will make another landfall in northern Vietnam on Aug. 3.    

At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT/11 p.m. China local time on Aug. 2, Tropical Storm Jebi had maximum sustained winds of 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 kph. It was centered near 20.1 north and 110.0 east, about 274 nautical miles east-southeast of Hanoi, Vietnam. Jebi is moving to the northwest at 14 knots/16 mph/26 kph.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects that once Jebi makes its "return" to land in northern Vietnam, it will eventually dissipate inland west-northwest of Hanoi as a result of interacting with the rugged topography.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

 


08.01.13 - NASA Looks at Tropical Storm Jebi in South China Sea

[image-51]Tropical Storm Jebi developed on July 31 and NASA satellite data on Aug. 1 shows the storm filling up at least half of the South China Sea.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Jebi on August 1 at 6:11 UTC or 2:11 a.m. EDT when it passed overhead from space. Strongest storms and heaviest rains appeared south of the center and in a large band of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the southwest. Additionally, fragmented bands of thunderstorms are also east of the center of the system.

AIRS showed that thunderstorms in the band of thunderstorms southwest of the center had cloud top temperatures that exceeded-63F/-52, indicating heavy rainfall. Infrared data also showed the stronger winds were displaced over the periphery of the storm.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the low-level circulation center is consolidating as deep central convection is quickly developing.

At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT on Aug. 1, Tropical Storm Jebi had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots/46 mph/74 kph. It was located near 17.0 north and 112.8 east, about 483 nautical miles east-southeast of Hanoi, Vietnam, but its cloud cover fills up a good deal of the South China Sea. Jebi is moving to the northwest at 7 knots/8 mph/13 kph.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Jebi to strengthen slightly before moving over Hainan Island, China, move through the Gulf of Tonkin, and make a final landfall over northern Vietnam within the next two days.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Image Token: 
[image-36]
purple and blue/green swirls show Jebi over a map of Southeast Asia
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Jebi on August 1 at 6:11 a.m. EDT. Strongest storms and heaviest rains appear around southwest of the center where cloud top temperatures exceed -63F/-52C (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-51]
satellite image of Jebi
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Jebi after it made landfall in Hainan Island, China. Jebi was headed for a second landfall in Vietnam on Aug. 3.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
Image Token: 
[image-78]
infrared image of Jebi
NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Jebi after landfall at 1531 UTC (11:31 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 3 as the storm was tracking north of Hanoi.
Image Credit: 
NASA
Image Token: 
[image-94]
Page Last Updated: August 5th, 2013
Page Editor: Karl Hille