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Melissa (North Atlantic Ocean)
November 22, 2013

Extra-Tropical Storm Melissa Spinning into History [image-184]

The National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on Extra-Tropical Storm Melissa as it spins toward to Azores Islands and weakens.

The final advisory on Melissa was issued on November 22 at 0300 UTC, or November 21 at 10 p.m. EST. At that time, Melissa still had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots/51.7 mph/83.3 kph, but its core had changed from warm to cold, like a typical mid-latitude low pressure system. Melissa was about 265 nautical miles/305 miles/490.8 km north-northwest of the Azores near 40.9 north and 32.1 west and headed to the east northeast at 24 knots/27.6 mph/44.4 kph.

A GOES-East satellite image from Nov. 22 at 1445 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST/1:45 p.m. Azores local time showed extra-tropical storm Melissa in the Eastern Atlantic near the Azores Islands.

Regional warnings were dropped for Azores on November 22. At 12 p.m. EST/4 p.m. local time in the Azores, Angra Do Heroismo and Lajes both reported sustained winds near 25 mph/40.2 kph from the west-northwest. Ponta Delgada and Santa Maria both reported winds from the west near 21 mph/33.8 kph. None of those areas reported rain at the time of the observations.

Melissa is expected to continue moving toward the east-northeast and weaken over the next day or two.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Nov. 21, 2013 - NASA Catches Melissa's Fickle Life as a Tropical Storm [image-182][image-168]

Tropical Storm Melissa is spinning around in the north Central Atlantic Ocean after becoming tropical on Nov. 18. On Nov. 21, Melissa is expected to convert to a post-tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured images that were made into an animation showing Melissa's conversion from a subtropical to tropical storm and now making another change.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite sits in a fixed position over the Atlantic Ocean and captures visible and infrared imagery continually. At the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. many images were combined into an animation to make a video that shows Melissa's transformations over Nov. 18 and Nov. 19.

On Nov 19 at 10 a.m. EST, Melissa's maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph/85 kph and it was bringing gale-force winds over parts of the western and central Azores Islands .

Melissa was centered near 40.0 north latitude and 34.8 west longitude, about 440 miles/710 kilometers west-northwest of the Azores. Melissa was moving to the east-northeast at a speedy 32 mph/52 kph and had a minimum central pressure near 984 millibars. The center of Melissa will pass north of the western Azores today, Nov. 21.

The National Hurricane Center expects Melissa to become post-tropical later today.  Gradual weakening is forecast during the next two days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 


Nov. 20, 2013 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Melissa's Tropical Transition [image-108][image-124][image-154]

Once a subtropical storm, now a tropical storm, Melissa made the transition on Nov. 20 as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and measured rainfall rates within the storm.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed directly above newly transformed Tropical Storm Melissa's center of circulation on November 20, 2013 at 11:21 UTC/6:21 a.m. EST. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument found that rain was falling at a maximum rate of 55 mm/~2.2 inches per hour in an area just to the southeast of Melissa's center of circulation.

TRMM Precipitation Radar data were also used to create a 3-D image that showed Melissa's structure. The TRMM data revealed that the tallest towers, reaching heights of over 13km/~8 miles, were located in a band of rainfall to the northwest of Melissa's center. The strongest intensity radar echo of over 49dBZ was returned from an area of heavy convective storms near Melissa's center. This heavy convection near the center signaled Melissa's transition from a subtropical storm to a tropical storm.

At 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST, Melissa's maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph/95 kph. Melissa is a good sized storm, as tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205 miles/335 km from the center.

The National Hurricane Center expects little change in strength over the next 24 hours, but does expect Melissa to lose her tropical characteristics thereafter, so her life as a tropical storm will be quite short.

Melissa's center was located near latitude 35.6 north and longitude 47.7 west, about 1,155 miles/1,860 km west of the Azores. The Azores is a group of nine volcanic islands in the North Atlantic Ocean. The island group is about 1,500 km/930 miles west of Lisbon, Portugal.

Melissa is moving toward the east-northeast near 30 mph/48 kph and this general motion is expected to continue during the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 988 millibars.

Although Melissa is far from land, the storm is still generating large ocean swells, rip currents, and dangerous surf in Bermuda, parts of the Northern Leeward Islands, Puerto Rico and Hispaniola today.  

The National Hurricane Center expects Melissa to continue moving northeast and pass north of the Azores.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 


Nov. 19, 2013 - NASA Sees Late Season Subtropical Storm Melissa Form in Atlantic[image-80][image-51][image-94]

Hurricane Season ends on November 30, and subtropical storm Melissa formed with less than two weeks to go. Melissa formed on Monday, November 18 about 695 miles/1,120 km east-southeast of Bermuda, near 29.3 north and 53.6 west. It had maximum sustained winds near 50 mph/85 kph and was moving to the northwest at 9 mph/15 kph. 

NASA's TRMM satellite flew above subtropical storm Melissa as it formed in the central Atlantic Ocean on November 18, 2013 at 1449 UTC (9:49 a.m. EST). TRMM captured rainfall data on Melissa using TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR). Both data were overlaid on an enhanced visible/infrared image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS). The TRMM pass found that the heaviest rainfall within Melissa was falling at a rate of over 74mm~2.9 inches per hour in an area of strong convective rainfall that was wrapping around the southern side of the storm.

On Nov. 19 at 10 a.m. EST, Melissa was moving north over the central Atlantic Ocean and the National Hurricane Center expects it to transition into a tropical storm later in the day.  At 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST, Melissa's maximum sustained winds were near 65 mph/100 kph. It was moving to the north at 10 mph/17 kph. Melissa's center was located about 595 miles/960 km east of Bermuda, near 31.9 north and 54.6 west.

The National Hurricane Center reported that various satellite data indicate that Melissa appears to be separating from the elongated parent cloud band east of the circulation center suggesting that the storm may be transitioning into a tropical cyclone.

Although Melissa is not a threat to land, the subtropical storm is causing rough surf and large swells to affect Bermuda, parts of the northern Leeward Islands, Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and southeastern Bahamas. Those conditions are expected to continue over the next couple of days and include life-threatening surf and rip currents.

Melissa is expected to the move to the north-northeast over the open waters of the North Atlantic Ocean and become a tropical storm later on Nov. 19.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 

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[image-36]
TRMM image of Melissa
On Nov. 18, 2013, NASA's TRMM satellite found that the heaviest rainfall within Melissa was falling at a rate of over 74mm~2.9 inches per hour in an area of strong convective rainfall that was wrapping around the southern side of the storm.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI/Hal Pierce
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[image-51]
MODIS image of Melissa
The MODIS instrument aboard the Terra satellite captured this image of Melissa as she formed on Monday, November 18 about 695 miles/1,120 km east-southeast of Bermuda.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-80]
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This Nov. 18 animation of Subtropical storm Melissa shows the TMI/PR instruments rain blending with NASA's TRMM satellite's VIRS instrument.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI/Hal Pierce
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[image-94]
TRMM 3-D image of Melissa
NASA's TRMM satellite saw Melissa on Nov. 20 after it became tropical. The tallest thunderstorms, over 8 miles high, were located northwest of the center.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-108]
MODIS image of Melissa
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image on Nov. 19 at 16:30 UTC/11:30 a.m. EDT of Subtropical Storm Melissa in the North Atlantic Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-124]
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This is a simulated 3-D flyby animation over subtropical storm Melissa using TRMM satellite data on Nov. 20 at 6:21 a.m. EST. Red indicates heavy rainfall.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-154]
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This 35 second video shows the northern movement of Tropical Storm Melissa in the North Central Atlantic Ocean on Nov. 18 to Nov. 21.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image-168]
GOES image of Melissa
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Melissa in the Central Atlantic on Nov. 21 at 1445 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image-182]
GOES image of Melissa
This GOES-East satellite image from Nov. 22 at 1445 UTC/9:45 a.m. EST shows extra-tropical storm Melissa in the Eastern Atlantic near the Azores Islands.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image-184]
Page Last Updated: November 22nd, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner