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MAVEN Early Results Telecon
October 14, 2014

Summary

NASA will host a news teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Oct. 14, to announce early science results from its Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission.

Launched in November 2013, the spacecraft entered orbit around Mars on Sept. 21 completing an interplanetary journey of 10 months and 442 million miles (711 million kilometers). MAVEN is the first spacecraft devoted to exploring and understanding the Martian upper atmosphere to help scientists understand climate change over the Red Planet's history.

Audio of the teleconference will be streamed live at http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio.
 


Presenters
 

  • Elsayed Talaat, MAVEN Program Scientist, NASA Headquarters
  • Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN Principal Investigator, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Mike Chaffin, Remote Sensing Team member, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Justin Deighan, Remote Sensing Team member, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Davin Larson, Solar Energetic Particles Instrument Lead, University of California, Berkeley

 


Briefing Materials

Elsayed Talaat

No materials.


Bruce Jakosky

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Fig. 1: This image shows the size of MAVEN's initial orbit when it first arrived at Mars, and then its current orbit after carrying out four maneuvers. The current orbit is very close to MAVEN's final science mapping orbit.
Credit: University of Colorado/NASA

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Fig. 2: Artist’s rendition of the MAVEN spacecraft in orbit around Mars, with all of the booms deployed and instruments turned on.  For scale, the spacecraft is 37 feet in length from tip to tip of the solar panels and extensions.
Credit: University of Colorado/NASA


Mike Chaffin

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Fig. 1: Atomic hydrogen scattering ultraviolet sunlight in the upper atmosphere of Mars, imaged by MAVEN’s Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph. Hydrogen is produced by the breakdown of water, which was once abundant on Mars' surface. Hydrogen is light and weakly bound by gravity, so it extends far from the planet (indicated with a red circle) and can readily escape.
Credit: University of Colorado; NASA

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Fig. 2: Atomic carbon scattering ultraviolet sunlight in the upper atmosphere of Mars, imaged by MAVEN’s Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph. Carbon is produced by the breakdown of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas thought to be abundant in Mars’ past.  Mars is indicated with a red circle; sunlight is illuminating the planet from the right.
Credit: University of Colorado; NASA


​Justin Deighan

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Fig. 1: Atomic oxygen scattering ultraviolet sunlight in the upper atmosphere of Mars, imaged by MAVEN’s Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph. Atomic oxygen is produced by the breakdown of carbon dioxide and water. Most oxygen is trapped near the planet, (indicated with a red circle) but some extends high above the planet and shows that that Mars is losing the gas to space.
Credit: University of Colorado; NASA

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Fig. 2: Three views of an escaping atmosphere, obtained by MAVEN’s Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph. By observing all of the products of water and carbon dioxide breakdown, MAVEN's remote sensing team can characterize the processes that drive atmospheric loss on Mars. These processes may have transformed the planet from an early Earthlike climate to the cold and dry climate of today.
Credit: University of Colorado; NASA

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The geographical distribution of ozone in the southern hemisphere of Mars, imaged by MAVEN’s Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph. On Mars, ozone is primarily destroyed by the combined action of water vapor and sunlight. The cold, dark conditions near the pole allow ozone to accumulate there.
Credit: University of Colorado; NASA; LATMOS/CNES


​Davin Larson

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Fig. 1: This image shows the sequence of events leading up to the first SEP event observed my MAVEN at Mars. The top panel shows the distance between MAVEN and Mars as a function of time.  The bottom Panel show Energetic Ion Flux as a function of particle energy (vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis).
Credit: Davin Larson

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Fig. 2: Coronagraph image taken by SOHO spacecraft from near Earth. From this this view angle the CME is heading to the left towards Mars.
Credit: ESA/NASA SOHO

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Fig. 3: Coronagraph image taken by STEREO spacecraft with is currently situated on the far side of the Sun. From this this view angle the CME is heading to the right towards Mars.
Credit: NASA STEREO Mission

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Fig. 4: This video shows the evolution of the Sept. 26, 2014, coronal mass ejection shock front as it propagates toward Mars as generated by the WSA-Cone-ENLIL model simulations performed at the NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center. The color map represents the density of the solar wind plasma in the inner heliosphere from near the sun out to twice the distance of Earth's orbit.
Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Page Last Updated: October 14th, 2014
Page Editor: Rob Garner