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Lekima (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
October 28, 2013

Extra-Tropical Storm Lekima Weakens in Northern Pacific [image-156]

Once a typhoon now an extra-tropical cyclone in the far northern Pacific Ocean, Lekima is weakening over cool waters. NASA's Aqua satellite captured the last image of Lekima as a typhoon before it weakened.

On Oct. 25 at 03:20 UTC, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Lekima in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. It was the second to last day that Lekima held onto typhoon status before weakening to an extra-tropical storm. The image showed that Lekima still maintained an eye, although it was filling in with clouds. At the time of the MODIS image, bands of thunderstorms still wrapped tightly around the center of circulation.

On Saturday, Oct. 26 the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final warning on Typhoon Lekima as it headed northeast into the cooler waters of the northern Pacific Ocean.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT on Oct. 26, Lekima was still a typhoon with maximum sustained winds near 70 knots/80.5 mph/129.6 kph, but the winds were quickly waning. Lekima was located near 36.9 north latitude and 152.4 east longitude, about 565 nautical miles/650.2 miles/ 1.046 km east-southeast of Misawa, Japan. Lekima was transitioning into an extra-tropical, cold core low pressure area and speeding northeast at 39 knots/44.8 mph/72.2 kph.

As Lekima continued weakening the storm expanded. On Oct. 26 at 0900 UTC, tropical storm-force winds extended 210 nautical miles/241.7 miles/388.7 km from the center, making the storm as wide as 420 nautical miles/483.3 miles/777.7 km in diameter. Lekima was a weakening cold-core low pressure area on Oct. 28.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 25, 2013 - NASA Sees Typhoon Lekima Stretching Out and Closing its Eye [image-126][image-142]

NASA's TRMM satellite observed Typhoon Lekima's shrinking eye on Oct. 24, and by the Oct. 25, the eye had shrunk to just 4 nautical miles. TRMM also observed very heavy rainfall occurring around the eyewall of the storm.

NASA's TRMM satellite flew above the center of Super-typhoon Lekima in the western North Pacific Ocean early on Oct. 24 and data was used to create a 3-D image of the storm's structure. TRMM's first orbit provided a look at Super-typhoon Lekima at 0745 UTC/3:45 a.m. EDT.  Lekima was somewhat close to Tropical Storm Francisco. Lekima was located southeast of Tropical Storm Francisco over the open waters of the Pacific.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. the data TRMM gathered was used to create imagery of the storm. Precipitation data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments were overlaid on infrared images from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS).  

TRMM's PR data revealed that Lekima had a small well defined eye at the center of the super typhoon with another concentric outer replacement eye wall. Rain was falling at a rate of over 130mm/~5.2 inches per hour in the powerful storms in Lekima's outer eyewall. Lekima was the fourth super typhoon in the western Pacific this year with wind speeds estimated to be over 130 knots/~150 mph.

Radar reflectivity data from TRMM's PR instrument were used to create 3-D images that showed differences between super typhoon Lekima and tropical storm Francisco. TRMM is managed by both NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

On Oct. 25, increasing wind shear is taking a toll on Typhoon Lekima, stretching it out and weakening convection in the storm. Enhanced infrared satellite imagery showed that Lekima's eye shrunk to a small pinhole, just 4 nautical miles/4.6 miles/7.4 km wide.  

At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. on Oct. 25, Lekima's maximum sustained winds were near 100 knots/115 mph/185 kph. The eye of the storm was located near 30.7 north and 146.0 east, about 444 nautical miles southeast of Yokosuka, Japan. Lekima was moving speedily at 24 knots/27.6 mph/44.4 kph to the north-northeast and is expect to turn toward the east-northeast over the next couple of days, remaining far to the east of the big island of Japan.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 24, 2013 - NASA Sees Super-typhoon Lekima Ready to Make the Curve [image-110]

Super-typhoon Lekima is poised to "make the curve" in the northwestern Pacific Ocean today. The storm's track is expected to shift from a northwesterly direction, and curve to northeasterly direction because it has started encountering mid-latitude westerly winds and a trough. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Lekima just before it began its directional shift.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Super-typhoon Lekima in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 24 at 0105 UTC/Oct. 23 at 9:05 p.m. EDT as it ran into an elongated area of low pressure from the west, as well as mid-latitude westerlies and wind shear.  Those factors started to elongate the system and change the storm's direction. The MODIS image showed a well- defined eye, about 25 nautical miles/28.7 miles/46.3 km wide and a thick eyewall of powerful thunderstorms around it.

On Oct. 24 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, Super-typhoon Lekima's maximum sustained winds were near 130 knots/149 mph/240.8 kph. It was centered near 23.2 north and 145.4 east, about 274 nautical miles/315 miles/ 507 km east-southeast of Iwo To. Lekima was still traveling to the northwest at 14 knots/16.1 mph/25.9 kph toward the Japanese Island of Iwo To, but it is expected to curve and head toward the northeast in the next day. 

Lekima is a powerful storm and is generating very rough seas. Wave heights are near 45 feet/13.7 meters, and those waves are propagating toward Iwo To. 

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that as Lekima moves northeast it will get embedded in the mid-latitude westerly winds. Cooler sea surface temperatures and increasing wind shear will weaken the storm, and it will become extra-tropical in a couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 23, 2013 - NASA Eyes Super-typhoon Lekima in the Northwestern Pacific [image-94]

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Lekima after it became a super-typhoon in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured visible and infrared data on the storm.

Early on Oct. 23 at 00:25 UTC/Oct. 22 at 8:25 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite was busy capturing data on Lekima. The MODIS image clearly showed Lekima's 20 nautical mile/23 mile/37 km-wide-eye with bands of thunderstorms wrapping tightly into the center of circulation.

On Oct. 23 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, Lekima's powerful sustained winds were near 140 knots/161.1 mph/259.3 kph. Typhoon-force winds extended 55 nautical miles/63.2 miles/101.9 km from the center, while tropical storm force winds extended 125 nautical miles/143.8 miles/231.5 km from the center. Lekima's eye was located near 19.7 north latitude and 149.2 east longitude, about 443 nautical miles/509 miles/820.4 km northeast of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Lekima was moving to the west-northwest at 11 knots/12.6 mph/20.3 kph.

Lekima is expected to move northwest for the next day and a half before it is pushed to the north and then northeast from an approaching trough (elongated area of low pressure) moving toward it from the west.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 22, 2013 - NASA Sees Hint of Typhoon Lekima's Rapid Intensification [image-78]

Tropical Storm Lekima intensified quickly early on Oct. 22 while traveling over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The day before the rapid intensification, NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and analyzed the rainfall rates in the storm, spotting heavy rainfall in two quadrants.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM, is managed by NASA and the Japan Space Agency. TRMM flew over Lekima on Oct. 21 at 07:18 UTC/3:18 a.m. EDT and found the heaviest rainfall north and east of the center, falling at a rate of over 2 inches/50 mm per hour. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted on Oct. 22 that satellite data indicated convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the typhoon) deepened/strengthened.

On Oct. 22 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Lekima's maximum sustained winds were up to 105 knots/120.8 mph/194.5 kph. Lekima's center was located near 16.7 north and 156.1 east, about 705 nautical miles/ 811.3 miles/ 1,306 km east-northeast of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Lekima is moving to the northwest at 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.3 kph.

Satellite data on Oct. 22 showed that Lekima now has a well-formed eye, about 15 nautical miles/17.2 miles/27.7 km wide with tight bands of thunderstorms wrapping into it. 

Lekima is forecast to continue on a northwesterly track for the next several days before making a turn to the northeast as it reaches the island of Iwo To.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


October 21, 2013 - Tropical Storm Lekima Born in Northwestern Pacific Ocean [image-51]

The twenty-eighth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season developed and strengthened into Tropical Storm Lekima.

On Oct. 21 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Lekima had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots/63.2 mph/101.9 kph. It was centered near 13.6 north and 159.4 east, about 815 nautical miles/ 937.9 miles/1,509 km east of Saipan. Lekima was moving to the north-northwest at 10 knots/11.5 mph/18.5 kph.

A visible image of Tropical Storm Lekima was obtained by Japan's MTSAT-2 satellite on Oct. 21 at 0532 UTC/1:32 a.m. EDT.  Additional infrared satellite imagery showed that the tropical storm was organizing and consolidating. Imagery showed that bands of thunderstorms were wrapping around the well-defined center of circulation, and a pinhole eye-like feature.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Lekima to strengthen to typhoon strength in the next day. Lekima's maximum sustained winds are expected to peak near 115 knots/132.3 mph/213 kph by Oct. 24 as it continues to move over open waters of the Northwestern Pacific. Lekima is forecast to approach Iwo To on Oct. 24, and then turn to the northeast away from the island.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

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Tropical Storm Lekima
This visible image of Tropical Storm Lekima was obtained by Japan's MTSAT-2 satellite on Oct. 21 at 0532 UTC/1:32 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
JAXA/NRL
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[image-51]
TRMM image of Lekima
NASA's TRMM satellite analyzed the rainfall rates in Tropical Storm Lekima on Oct. 21 and found the heaviest rainfall north and east of the center (red) at over 2 inches/50 mm per hour.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-78]
MODIS image of Lekima
NASA's Terra satellite image on Oct. 23 at 00:25 clearly showed Lekima's 20 nautical mile/23 mile/37 km-wide-eye with bands of thunderstorms wrapping tightly into the center of circulation.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-94]
Super-typhoon Lekima
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Lekima in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 24 at 0105 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-110]
TRMM image of Lekima
This 3-D image of Super-Typhoon Lekima on Oct. 24, 2013 shows the heaviest rainfall rates and highest clouds in red.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-126]
Youtube Override: 
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This is a TRMM 3-D flyby animation over Super-typhoon Lekima on Oct. 24 that shows cloud heights and rainfall.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Typhoon Lekima
On Oct. 25 at 03:20 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Lekima in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, the second to last day that it was at typhoon status before weakening.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-156]
Page Last Updated: October 28th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner