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Karina (Eastern Pacific)
August 27, 2014

Karina's Remnants Drawn into Hurricane Marie's Spin[image-240]

Karina finally became a remnant low pressure area after roaming around in the Eastern Pacific for two weeks. Satellite data on August 27 showed that the now shapeless former hurricane was being drawn into nearby Hurricane Marie's circulation.

The last bulletin on Karina was issued by the National Hurricane Center on August 27 at 0300 UTC (11 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, August 26).

At that time, Karina's maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph (45 kph). It was centered near latitude 15.9 north and longitude 126.5 west. That's 1,185 miles (1,905 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Karina was moving toward the southeast near 5 mph (7 kph) and was expected to turn east-northeast as it continues moving around Hurricane Marie's circulation.

Infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on August 27 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) showed the remnants of Karina caught up in Hurricane Marie's circulation. Karina's remnants appeared as a formless shape of clouds southwest of Marie. The GOES image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Karina is expected to open up into a trough (elongated area) of low pressure late on Wednesday, August 27 as it continues to be drawn around Hurricane Marie.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 26, 2014 - Satellite Shows Hurricane Marie About to Swallow Karina[image-143]

Massive Hurricane Marie appears like a giant fish about to swallow tiny Tropical Depression Karina on satellite imagery today from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. Karina, now a tropical depression is being swept into Marie's circulation where it is expected to be eaten, or absorbed.

An image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 26 at 8 a.m. EDT shows Karina being drawn into the powerful and large circulation of Hurricane Marie to the east of the depression. The image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted that although deep convection could re-develop today, increasing easterly wind shear associated with the outflow of Hurricane Marie should make it difficult for any thunderstorm development to keep going.  

At 11 a.m. EDT on August 26, Karina's maximum sustained winds dropped to 30 mph (45 kph) and was weakening. Karina was centered near latitude 16.6 north and longitude 127.3 west, about 1,210 miles (1,950 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Karina is moving toward the southeast at 6 mph (9 kph).

Karina is expected to degenerate into a trough (elongated area) of low pressure and rotate around the southern portion of the large circulation of Hurricane Marie over the next day until it is absorbed by Marie.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 25, 2014 - Sees Tropical Storm Karina Overpowered by Hurricane Marie[image-127]

Hurricane Marie is a powerhouse in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and because it is close to Tropical Storm Karina, Karina is being weakened by wind shear from the larger, more powerful storm. NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured the tiny storm near Hurricane Marie today.

On August 23, Karina had strengthened into a hurricane and by the next day wind shear had weakened the storm back into a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph (110 kph). Satellite data on August 24 gave Karina the classic appearance of a sheared tropical cyclone, showing the strongest storms on the eastern side of the center. That means strong vertical westerly wind shear was battering the storm and pushing the strongest thunderstorms east of the center.

By August 25, the strongest thunderstorms in Karina dissipated. Very early in the morning the strong thunderstorms were located to the west-northwest of the center, pushed by vertical wind shear from the east-southeast. By mid-morning, they had disappeared from satellite imagery. Moderate east-southeasterly vertical shear was still being produced by Marie's large upper-level anticyclone to the east, and is expected to further weaken Karina.

An infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on August 25 at 13:45 UTC (9:45 a.m. EDT) showed Tropical Storm Karina as a small area of clouds compared to massive Hurricane Marie to the east. The image was created at the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.

By 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on August 25, Karina's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 40 mph (65 kph). Karina was located near 17.2 north latitude and 128.4 west longitude, about 1,260 miles (2,030 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Karina was moving to the east-southeast at 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to continue in that direction for the next couple of days.   

Forecasters expect Karina to move around the western to southwestern edge of Hurricane Marie today and weaken to a depression. Karina is expected to continue moving around Marie's edge tomorrow while weakening into a remnant low pressure area.    

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 22, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Karina Get a Boost[image-111]

NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Karina get a boost on August 22 in the form of some moderate rainfall and towering thunderstorms in the center of the storm.  

[image-192]The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed directly above the center of Tropical Storm Karina on August 22, 2014 at 0151 UTC (Aug. 21 at 9:51 p.m. EDT). A rainfall analysis that used data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) showed that storms near Karina's center were dropping rain at a rate near 25 mm/1 inch per hour. Where the heaviest rainfall was occurring, TRMM spotted a couple of towering thunderstorms as high as 15 km (~9 miles).

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured Tropical Storm Karina, Tropical Storm Lowell and Tropical Storm Marie in an infrared image on Aug. 22 at 5 a.m. EDT. Karina appeared to be in the lead of the triple tropical train of storms moving through the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The image showed how much smaller and compact Karina is in comparison to Tropical Storm Lowell. 

At 11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Karina's maximum sustained winds had increased to near 70 mph (110 kph), and the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that some fluctuations in intensity are possible before Karina begins to weaken on August 23. The center of Tropical Storm Karina was located near latitude 15.0 north and longitude 135.6 west, about 1,325 miles (2,130 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. Karina is moving to the northeast near 3 mph (6 kph) and is expected to turn to the east-northeast as it continues being affected by nearby Tropical Storm Lowell.

Forecaster Roberts at NHC noted that in two days Karina should be on a weakening trend because the storm will be moving into cooler waters and it will run into stable, dry air.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 21 2014 - Tropical Storm Karina Looks Like a Giant "Number 9" From Space [image-95]

Despite being the eleventh tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean Hurricane Season, Karina looked like a giant number nine from NASA's Aqua satellite.

Tropical Storm Karina was weakening on August 20 when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard Terra snapped a visible image of Tropical Storm Karina on August 20 at 19:40 UTC (3:40 p.m. EDT). The MODIS image showed that a thick band of strong thunderstorms spiraled into Karina's center from the southeast. The band of thunderstorms wrapped around Karina's eastern and northern quadrants, spiraling into the center from the west, making the tropical cyclone look like the number nine.

On August 21 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Karina's maximum sustained winds had decreased to near 50 mph (85 kph). Karina was centered near latitude 15.6 north and longitude 136.2 west, about 1,275 miles (2,050 km east of Hilo, Hawaii). Karina is now drifting to the east-southeast near 2 mph (4 kph) and is expected to continue in that direction with a turn to the northeast late on August 22 as it nears Tropical Storm Lowell.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Karina is now being affected by moderate-to-strong vertical wind shear. Wind shear acts like a battering ram in the atmosphere and can tear a storm apart.

A tropical cyclone is stacked like a tire that sits sideways on the ground and stretches through the middle and upper troposphere. In addition to wind shear, dry air is moving into Karina in the middle and upper levels of the atmosphere and sapping the moisture from the storm, inhibiting development of thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone. The NHC noted that the dry air will continue to affect Karina over the next day or two which will continue weakening the storm.

 Karina is close to 140 degrees longitude, which is the where the Central Pacific Ocean begins. However, because Karina is forecast to move to the northeast, it appears that it will stay in the Eastern Pacific for the rest of its lifetime.  

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 20, 2014 - Satellite Eyes a Big Influence on Tropical Storm Karina[image-79]

NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that Tropical Storm Karina's next move is based on its interaction with Tropical Storm Lowell.

Lowell is positioned to the east of Tropical Storm Karina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Karina is still well over 1,000 miles away from Hawaii and has become almost stationary as the mammoth Tropical Storm Lowell creeps closer to it. The CPHC expects Karina to start drifting eastward and away from Hawaii starting Thursday, August 21, as Karina starts being affected by Lowell's massive circulation.

On August 20, NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured three tropical low pressure areas lined up from the Eastern to the Central Pacific. From east to west were Tropical Storm Lowell, Tropical Storm Karina and a developing area of low pressure to the southeast of Hawaii. The image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

At 11 a.m. EDT on August 20, Tropical Storm Karina's maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph (95 kph) and the CPHC expects some fluctuations in strength over the next couple of days. Karina was centered near latitude 15.8 north and longitude 136.6 west, about 1,245 miles (2,005 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii.  .

As soon as Karina begins to feel the influence of Tropical Storm Lowell's larger circulation in the next day or two, it is expected to drift eastward and then northeastward with an increase in forward speed around the south and east sides of Lowell.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that once the cyclone moves away from the deep tropics in 3 days or so, it will encounter cooler waters and it will begin to weaken.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-128]Aug. 19, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Karina Losing its Punch

Tropical Storm Karina continues to weaken in the Eastern Pacific over open waters, and NASA data shows there's not much punch left in the storm.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite can measure the rate of rainfall from its orbit in space and when it passed over Tropical Storm Karina in the Eastern Pacific it saw an isolated area of heavy rain remaining in the storm.

Tropical Storm Karina weakened during the overnight hours and by Tuesday, August 19, maximum sustained winds had decreased to near 60 mph (95 kph). When TRMM passed overhead at 03:04 UTC (11:04 p.m. EDT, Aug. 18) on August 19, TRMM Precipitation Radar showed that there was an isolated area of heavy rain in the western quadrant where rain was falling at a rate of 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Cloud heights in the area of the heaviest rainfall were just under 10 kilometers indicating that the uplift in the storm is weakening, as clouds reached greater heights earlier in the week.

Forecaster Berg at NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted today "Water vapor imagery suggests that the outflow from Tropical Storm Lowell may be helping to produce southeasterly shear over Karina, and the low-level center is now exposed to the east of a small area of deep convection." 

At 5 a.m. EDT on August 19, the center of Tropical Storm Karina was located near latitude 15.7 north and longitude 134.0 west, about 1,415 miles (2,275 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. Karina is moving toward the west-southwest near 7 mph (11 kph) and is forecast to turn westward and slow down soon. The estimated minimum central pressure is 999 millibars.

Two computer models used by the NHC to forecast tropical cyclones: the Florida State Super ensemble and HWRF models, weaken Karina to a tropical depression in about 72 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-96][image-112]Tropical Storm Karina: Status Quo on Infrared Satellite Imagery

Since Tropical Storm Karina weakened from hurricane status, and since then, NASA satellite data has shown that the storm has been pretty consistent with strength and thunderstorm development.

Hurricane Karina formed on August 13, 2014 off the Mexican coast. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed directly above the center of intensifying tropical storm Karina on August 14, 2014 at 1927 UTC (3:27 p.m. EDT). TRMM's Microwave Imager showed that storms near Karina's center were dropping rain at a rate of over 50mm (almost 2 inches) per hour. After that TRMM fly over, Karina was upgraded to a hurricane within a couple hours. However, in less than 24 hours, by August 15 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), Karina weakened back to tropical storm status.

In the days that followed, Karina's cloud pattern didn't change much. Satellite data showed that strong thunderstorms still circle the center, especially on the northern edge.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Karina on August 18 at 6:23 a.m. EDT on Monday, August 18 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured infrared data on the storm's clouds. Infrared data basically shows temperature, and the AIRS data showed strong thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C indicating they were high in the troposphere. The bulk of the strong thunderstorms continued to be pushed to the northern quadrant as a result of southerly wind shear. 

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Karina's maximum sustained winds remain near 45 mph (75 kph). The center of Tropical Storm Karina was located near latitude 16.8 north and longitude 132.4 west, that's about 1,500 miles (2,415 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. Karina is moving toward the west-southwest near 9 mph (15 kph) and is expected to slow down. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1002 millibars.

NHC's forecaster Avila noted that "Karina has the chance to slightly strengthen since the circulation is moving over warmer waters and into weaker shear. By the end of the forecast period, the outflow from larger Tropical Depression 12-E to the northeast should induce stronger shear and prevent additional strengthening."

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]NASA Satellite Spots a Weakening Karina, Now a Tropical Storm

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Karina before it weakened to a tropical storm early on August 15 and imagery showed the vertical wind shear was already taking its toll.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Karina on August 14 at 2:40 p.m. EDT when it was still clinging to hurricane status and noticed that wind shear was already having an effect on the storm's structure. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured an image that showed that the bulk of Karina's clouds were being pushed to the western side of the storm. That was an indication that vertical wind shear was moderate to strong and it continued weakening the storm.

On August 15, Karina continued to experience 20 to 25 knots of easterly vertical wind shear, which has caused the center to become partly exposed on the eastern side of the deep convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm).

A tropical storm has maximum sustained wind speed between 39 and 73 mph. By 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on August 15, Karina's maximum sustained winds had decreased to 70 mph (110 kph) and the National Hurricane Center expects additional weakening over the next two days.

Karina's center was located latitude 17.2 north and longitude 119.1 west, about 715 miles (1,150 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Karina was moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 kph) and is expected to turn to the west-northwest. The estimated minimum central pressure is 990 millibars.

Wind shear is expected to decrease while Karina moves over sea surface temperatures of near 26C (80F). Tropical cyclones need sea surface temperatures of at least 26C/80F to maintain strength. The National Hurricane Center noted, "this could allow Karina to re-intensify as forecast by the GFDL and the Navy COAMPS computer forecast models. However, any deviation north of the forecast track would take the system over colder water, which would prevent strengthening."

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 14, 2014 - NASA Sees Fragmented Thunderstorm Bands Wrapped Around Tropical Storm Karina[image-63]

Although Tropical Storm Karina is still strengthening in the Eastern Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a large band of fragmented thunderstorms wrapping into its center from the north.

On August 13 at 21:00 UTC (5 p.m. EDT), the MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Karina off the west coast of Mexico. The image showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation while the band of thunderstorms to the north appeared broken. The strongest and largest area of precipitation appeared on the storm's southwestern side.

At 5 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. PDT/0900 UTC) on Thursday, August 14, the center of Tropical Storm Karina was located near latitude 17.4 north and longitude 115.2 west. That's about 510 miles (825 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Karina was moving toward the west near 14 mph. (22 kph). Maximum sustained winds have increased to near 60 mph (95 kph) and the National Hurricane Center expects the storm to continue strengthening. 

The NHC expects Karina to become a hurricane late on August 14 as it continues in a westerly direction through the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Tropical Storm Karina Forms in Eastern Pacific Near Socorro Island[image-36]

Socorro Island in the Eastern Pacific received an unwelcome tropical visitor on the morning of August 13 when satellite data confirmed the formation of Tropical Storm Karina.

Karina strengthened from the eleventh tropical depression in the Eastern Pacific. Tropical Depression 11-E formed at 11 p.m. EDT on August 12. Just twelve hours later at 11 a.m. EDT, the depression had become better organized and winds increased to tropical storm strength.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of newborn Tropical Storm Karina approaching Socorro Island in the Eastern Pacific on August 13 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). The GOES image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.     

Forecaster Stewart at NOAA's National Hurricane Center noted that deep convection has continued to increase with cloud tops of -80C to -84C (-112F to -119.2F) just west of the low-level center. Infrared data is used to help determine cloud top temperatures. One of NASA's instruments that analyze tropical cyclones is the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.

In August 13 at 8 a.m. PDT (11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Karina was located near latitude 17.2 north and longitude 111.0 west. That's about 110 miles (180 km) south of Socorro Island. Socorro is a small volcanic island and is part of Mexico's Revillagigedo Islands. It is located about 370 miles (600 km) west of mainland Mexico.  

Karina's maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) and the National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects strengthening over the next two days as it moves west. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars.

Despite the vertical wind shear that is currently affecting the system, it still managed to strengthen and organize into a tropical storm. The National Hurricane Center forecast calls for that wind shear to slowly subside over the next 4 to 5 days while the Karina remains over warm sea surface temperatures of 28-29C, so steady intensification appears likely. NHC expects Karina to reach hurricane strength on August 16.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Karina approaching Socorro Island
This GOES-West satellite image from August 13 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) captured newborn Tropical Storm Karina approaching Socorro Island in the Eastern Pacific.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Karina
On August 13 at 21:00 UTC (5 p.m. EDT), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Karina off the west coast of Mexico.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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GOES-West image of Karina and Lowell
On August 20, NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured (left to right) a developing area of low pressure in the Central Pacific, Tropical Storm Karina and Tropical Storm Lowell in the Eastern Pacific.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Tropical Storm Karina
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Karina on August 20, it looked like a giant number 9 as a thick band of thunderstorms wrapped into its center.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Tropical tempest train
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured Tropical Storm Karina (left), Tropical Storm Lowell (center) and Tropical Storm Marie (right) in an infrared image on Aug. 22 at 5 a.m. EDT as they moved through the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA's GOES Project
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GOES image of Karina and Marie
This infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on August 25 at 13:45 UTC (9:45 a.m. EDT) shows Tropical Storm Karina as a small area of clouds compared to massive Hurricane Marie to the east.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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GOES image of Karina and Marie
This image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 26 at 8 a.m. EDT shows Karina, now a tropical depression, being swept into Marie's circulation where it is expected to be eaten, or absorbed.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Karina
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Karina in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 14 at 2:40 p.m. EDT when it was still a hurricane.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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AIRS image of Karina
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Karina on August 18 at 6:23 a.m. EDT on Monday, August 18 and the AIRS instrument captured an infrared image. The image showed strong thunderstorms (purple) continued to circle the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Karina
On August 14, the TRMM satellite showed that storms near Karina's center were dropping rain at a rate of over 50mm/2 inches per hour (red). TRMM rainfall data was overlaid on a GOES-WEST image received at 1930 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM image of Karina
When TRMM passed over Tropical Storm Karina on August 19, there was an isolated area of heavy rain (red) in the western quadrant where rain was falling at a rate of 2 inches/40 mm per hour.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM image of Karina
The TRMM satellite passed directly above the center of Tropical Storm Karina on August 22, 2014 at 0151 UTC and saw moderate (green) rainfall in the center.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Karina subsumed into Marie
At 5 a.m. EDT on Aug. 27, NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed that the now shapeless former hurricane was being drawn into nearby Hurricane Marie's circulation.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Page Last Updated: August 27th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner