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Kammuri (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
September 29, 2014

[image-112]NASA Sees Tropical Storm Kammuri Winding Down Over Open Ocean

Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to appear more like a cold front on satellite imagery as it transitions into an extra-tropical storm over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over Kammuri on Sept. 29 at 7:40 a.m. EDT (11:40 UTC), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured an infrared look at the storm. MODIS showed that the bulk of strong storms elongated from southwest to northeast.

On Sept. 29, 2014 at 0300 UTC (Sept. 28 at 11 p.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Kammuri had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). It was centered near 34.1 north latitude and 147.3 east longitude over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The center is 320 nautical miles away from mainland Japan.

Kammuri was moving to the northeast at 14 knots (16.1 mph/25.9 kph) and is becoming embedded in the westerlies (winds). Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Kammuri to be fully extra-tropical by Sept. 30 as it continues to weaken over the open ocean. When a storm becomes extra-tropical its core goes from warm to cold, like a typical mid-latitude low pressure (storm) system.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center has closed the books on Kammuri but noted that it will be watched for regeneration.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-80][image-96]NASA Sees Tropical Storm Kammuri's Spiral Bands of Soaking Thunderstorms

Tropical Storm Kammuri continues to strengthen on its north-northwestern track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and NASA's TRMM satellite identified a band of thunderstorms containing heavy rainfall northwest of the storm's center. Meanwhile NASA's Aqua satellite got a look at the entire storm and saw that those bands of storms circled the entire storm.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew over the northern half of Tropical Storm Kammuri on Sept. 26 at 1:44 a.m. EDT and the Precipitation Radar instrument saw a strong band of thunderstorms dropping rainfall over 1.2 inches (30.4 mm) per hour. The TRMM satellite is managed by both NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Storm Kammuri on Sept. 26 at 03:11 UTC (Sept. 25 at 11:11 p.m. EDT) and saw strong bands of towering thunderstorms with cold cloud temperatures around the entire storm. Cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F/-53C indicating they extended high into the troposphere and had the potential to generate heavy rainfall, such as what the TRMM satellite observed. Animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery also showed that the low-level circulation center is consolidating as the bands of thunderstorms spiraled into the rounded center.

On Sept. 26 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Kammuri had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63 mph/102 kph). It was centered near 23.5 north latitude and 145.3 east longitude, about 252 nautical miles (290 miles/466.7 km) east-southeast of the island of Iwo To, Japan. Kammuri is moving to the north-northwest at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph).

Kammuri is still forecast to intensify as it moves in a north-northwesterly direction through warm sea surface temperatures, toward the island of Iwo To. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Kammuri to be typhoon strength as it passes east of the island of Iwo To on Sept. 27 and begin weakening on Sept. 29 while curving to the northeast staying from the big island of Japan.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Sept. 25, 2014 - NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Kammuri Coming Together

When NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri the VIIRS instrument aboard took a visible picture of the storm that showed bands of thunderstorms wrapped around its center. The storm appears to be coming together as circulation improves and bands of thunderstorms have been wrapping into the low-level center of circulation.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri on Sept. 25 at 03:13 UTC (Sept. 24 at 11:13 p.m. EDT) and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured a visible picture of the storm. The VIIRS instrument revealed strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation an in broken bands to the northwest and northeast of the center. Bands of thunderstorms were also forming south of the center and spiraling into the middle of the storm.

On Sept. 25 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Kammuri's maximum sustained winds were near 45 knots (83.3 mph/51.7 kph). It was centered near 20.8 north latitude and 146.5 east longitude, about 400 nautical miles southeast of Iwo To. Kammuri was moving to the north-northwest at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph).

Kammuri is still forecast to intensify as it moves in a north-northwesterly direction through warm sea surface temperatures, toward the island of Iwo To. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Kammuri to be typhoon strength as it passes east of the island of Iwo To on Sept. 27.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36]Sept. 24, 2014 - NASA Sees System 98W Become Tropical Depression Kammuri

Strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation in tropical low pressure System 98W were seen on infrared satellite imagery and were a clue to forecasters that the storm was intensifying. Early on Sept. 24, the storm intensified into Tropical Depression Kammuri far north of Guam.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression Kammuri on Sept. 24 at 12:23 a.m. EDT. Kammuri is a large storm and strong thunderstorms covered a long area within the somewhat elongated circulation. The circulation center was near the western edge of the massive extent of clouds. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard Aqua gathered infrared temperature data on the storm's clouds. The data was false-colored at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. The strongest thunderstorms had cloud-top temperatures near -63F/-53C reaching high into the troposphere (lowest layer of the atmosphere) and with the potential to generate heavy rain.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center bulleting on Sept. 24 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) noted that Kammuri had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was centered about 320 miles northeast of Saipan, near 19.3 north latitude and 149.3 east longitude. At the time, the depression had It was moving to the north-northwestward at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph).

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Kammuri to intensify into a typhoon and move to the north-northwest passing near the island of Iwo To on Sept. 27.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

AIRS image of Kammuri
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the large Tropical Depression Kammuri on Sept. 24 at 12:23 a.m. EDT and saw its circulation center west of the large extent of clouds (blue and purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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NPP Image of Kammuri
This visible image of Tropical Storm Kammuri was taken on Sept. 25 from the VIIRS instrument aboard NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NOAA/NASA
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TRMM image of Kammuri
TRMM satellite flew over the northern half of Tropical Storm Kammuri on Sept. 26 at 1:44 a.m. EDT and saw a strong band of thunderstorms dropping rainfall over 1.2 inches per hour (red).
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/JAXA
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AIRS image of Kammuri
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Storm Kammuri on Sept. 26 at 03:11 UTC and saw strong bands of towering thunderstorms with cold cloud temperatures (purple) around the entire storm.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
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MODIS image of Kammuri
On Sept. 29 NASA's Terra satellite saw the bulk of strong storms within Tropical Storm Kammuri were stretched out. The storm had elongated from southwest to northeast.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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Page Last Updated: September 29th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner