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Jangmi (South China Sea)
December 31, 2014

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Strong Wind Shear Tearing Tropical Depression Jangmi Apart

Tropical Depression Jangmi encountered strong southeasterly vertical wind shear in the Sulu Sea and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible picture of the storm on Dec. 31.

After crossing southern and central Philippines, Jangmi encountered moderate to strong wind shear on Dec. 31. Jangmi had moved into the Sulu Sea, which is located just west of the Visayas and Mindanao regions of Philippines. Jangmi's center never made it to the island of Palawan, which borders the Sulu Sea to the west. Palawan is an island province of the Philippines in the Mimaropa Region.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression Jangmi on Dec. 31 at 06:13 UTC (1:13 a.m. EST) and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument image revealed the effects of wind shear. The VIIRS image showed that the north, northeastern and eastern quadrants of the storm were almost devoid of clouds and showers, as they were being pushed to the northwest and west of the center.  Those thunderstorms northwest of the center were weakening. Some of the thunderstorms were being pushed to the northwest and over the island of Palawan.

At 0300 UTC on Dec. 31 (10 p.m. EST on Dec. 30), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued their final bulletin on the depression. At that time, Jangmi had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph) and was centered near 8.8 north latitude and 121.5 east longitude, or about 116 nautical miles (133.5 miles/214.8 km) north of Zamboanga, Philippines. Jangmi was moving to the south at 6 knots (6.9 mph/11.1 kph).

JTWC noted that upper-level analysis indicates the system has moved into a hostile environment with moderate to high southeasterly vertical wind shear.  JTWC forecasters expect Jangmi to dissipate within a day.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-114][image-132]Dec. 30, 2014 (Update #2) - NASA Adds up Flooding Rainfall from Tropical Storm Jangmi

Heavy rainfall from Tropical storm Jangmi recently produced flooding and landslides in the Philippines that have reportedly killed over 30 people. Data from NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite was used to total that rainfall. 

Jangmi became the twenty-third named tropical cyclone in the western Pacific Ocean when it formed southeast of the Philippines on December 28, 2014.The Philippines frequently gets hit by tropical cyclones and Tropical storm Jangmi hit only three weeks after slow moving Typhoon Hagiput churned through the central Philippines.

The TRMM satellite had a fairly good view of Jangmi on December 29, 2014 at 1425 UTC (9:25 a.m. EST). The TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) instrument showed that intense rain bands around the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 50mm (almost 2 inches) per hour.

Measurements derived from merging rainfall estimates from various satellites are produced in near real time at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. These estimates cover a global belt extending from 50 degrees South to 50 degrees North latitude. A Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) was produced at Goddard to show rainfall totals in the area of the Philippines from December 23-30, 2014. That analysis showed that tropical storm Jangmi produced copious amounts of rainfall near it's track. However, the highest rainfall totals were in the area of onshore flow northeast of the tropical storm's center of circulation. Rainfall weekly totals were estimated to be greater than 600 mm (about 24 inches) over the Samar Sea. This is in the area where many are still recovering from the devastation caused by typhoon Haiyan in 2013.

Harold F. Pierce
NASA/Science Systems and Applications Inc. (SSAI)






 


[image-69]Dec. 30, 2014 - NASA Sees a Weaker Tropical Depression Jangmi Slide into Sulu Sea

Tropical storm Jangmi, known in the Philippines as "Seniang" weakened to a tropical depression as it moved into the Sulu Sea and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that showed its eastern side was still affecting the central and northern Philippines on Dec. 30.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Jangmi on Dec. 30 at 5:50 UTC (12:50 a.m. EST), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument, took a visible picture of the storm. The MODIS image showed that the center of the storm had moved into the Sulu Sea, located to the west of the Philippines, but the storm's eastern quadrant was still spreading clouds, rains and gusty winds over the Visayas and Luzon regions (central and northern) of the Philippines.

By 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Jangmi's maximum sustained winds dropped to 30 knots (35.5 mph/55.5 kph). However, once it passes Palawan, forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Jangmi to re-strengthen into a tropical storm for a couple of days before weakening again. Jangmi was centered near 9.9 north latitude and 120.0 east longitude, about 95 nautical miles (109.3 miles/175.9 km) northeast of Puerto Princesa, Philippines. It was moving to the west-southwest at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

Jangmi is expected to continue moving toward Palawan, and into the South China Sea. The extended forecast track takes the storm to landfall in the Malayan peninsula by January 4, 2015.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-50]Dec. 29, 2014 - NASA Spots Tropical Storm Jangmi Moving into Sulu Sea

NASA's Aqua satellite saw Tropical Storm Jangmi as it moved through the central and southern Philippines on Dec. 29. Jangmi is known locally in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Seniang.

Many warnings remain in effect as Jangmi continues moving west toward the South China Sea. On Dec. 29, public storm warning signal #1 is in effect in the Visayas provinces of Leyte, Southern Leyte, Camotes Island, rest of Cebu, rest of Negros Occidental, Guimaras, southern part of Iloilo and southern part of Antique. The public storm warning #1 is also in effect in the Mindanao provinces of Bukidnon, Lanao del Norte and Sur, Misamis Occidental Zamboanga del Norte and Sur and Sibugay, Agusan del Sur.

The public storm warning signal #2 is in effect in the Visayas provinces of Bohol, Siquijor, Southern Cebu, Negros Oriental, Southern part of Negros Occidental. It is also in effect in the Mindanao provinces of Surigao del Norte, Siargao Island, Agusan del Norte, Misamis Oriental, Camiguin, and the Dinagat Province.

Tropical Storm Jangmi made landfall in northeastern Mindanao, Philippines on Dec. 28 and has moved across the central part of the country. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Jangmi on Dec. 29 at 05:05 UTC (12:05 a.m. EST) and saw that the storm was over the Visayas (central) and Mindanao (southern) regions of the country. Bands of thunderstorms wrapped into the center from the northeastern and southeastern quadrants stretching back over the Philippine Sea (east of the country).

On Dec. 29 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), Jangmi had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots. It was moving to the northwest at 9 knots. Jangmi was centered near 10.0 north latitude and 124.2 east longitude, about 352 nautical miles southeast of Manila. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) looked at animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery and a radar animation from Cebu Station, Philippines that showed Jangmi intensified as it tracked across the Surigao Strait. The low level circulation had become more tightly wrapped and better defined despite a weakening in the bands of thunderstorms as the system made landfall across Bohol Island.

JTWC's forecast on Dec. 29 calls for Jangmi to move in a west-southwesterly direction through the Sulu Sea and over southern Palawan before moving into the South China Sea while maintaining strength as a tropical storm. The current JTWC forecast track takes Jangmi toward the border of southern Thailand and northern Malaysia around January 3, 2015.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Jangmi image taken by Aqua
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Jangmi over the central and southern Philippines on Dec. 29 at 5:05 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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NPP image of Jangmi
NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression Jangmi on Dec. 31 at 06:00 UTC (1 a.m. EST) and the VIIRS instrument saw wind shear pushing it apart.
Image Credit: 
NOAA/NASA/NRL
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MODIS image of Jangmi
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Jangmi on Dec. 30 at 12:50 a.m. EST the center of the storm had moved into the Sulu Sea, located to the west of the Philippines. Credit:
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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TRMM image of Jangmi
On Dec. 29, 2014 at 1425 UTC (9:25 a.m. EST) TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) instrument showed that intense rain bands (red) around the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 50mm (almost 2 inches) per hour.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM shows rainfall totals from Jangmi
Rainfall totals in the area of the Philippines from December 23-30, 2014 show weekly totals were estimated to be greater than 600 mm (about 24 inches) over the Samar Sea.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: January 5th, 2015
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner