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Iselle (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
August 12, 2014

[image-314][image-330][image-346]Tropical Storm Iselle Departs Hawaii While Julio Stays Well North

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Iselle and gathered data on clouds and rainfall as it affected Hawaii.

Iselle was once a rather powerful category 4 hurricane in the East Pacific with sustained winds estimated at 120 knots (~138 mph) by the National Hurricane Center. Fortunately, a combination of southwesterly wind shear, drier air and cooler waters weakened Iselle considerably as it approached the Hawaiian Islands.  Although much weaker, Iselle still struck the southeast Kau coast of the Big Island of Hawaii as a rather strong tropical storm.  In fact Iselle, was the strongest and only the second tropical storm to hit the Big Island in over 50 years.  The center made landfall around 2:30 am HST on Friday, August 8, near Pahala with sustained winds of 60 mph.

The Big Island bore the brunt of the storm where downed trees and power lines left 25,000 people without power.  Currently, several days after the storm, around 8,000 are still without power on the island.  After hitting the Big Island, Iselle continued to track to the west-northwest keeping the center of circulation well south of the rest of the Hawaiian Islands, which mainly received just rain from Iselle's outer rainbands.  On Kauai, however, one woman was reported to have been swept away and drowned while hiking.

TRMM captured an image of Iselle on August 9 at 09:06 UTC (August 8 at 11:06 p.m. local time) as the center was passing well south of the far western islands of Kauai and Ni'ihau.  By that time, Iselle had been degraded to a tropical depression, and TRMM showed the exposed center of Iselle, which was devoid of any eyewall or even rain. There are several outer rainbands located only on the northeast side of the storm that were still effecting the western part of the state. 

Data from that same satellite over pass (orbit) was used to create a 3-D image of the storm looking north.   Areas in green show that much of the rain is relatively shallow with tops ranging from about 5 to 8 km, but there are isolated areas of higher tops associated with deeper penetrating individual convective cells embedded within the rainbands.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland a TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation data (TMPA) analysis was conducted that uses TRMM data to calibrate rainfall estimates from other satellites. The analysis expands the rainfall coverage of the TRMM satellite.  TMPA rainfall estimates were calculated to cover August 4 to 11 for the Hawaiian Islands and surrounding area.  Two swaths of heavier rain showed the paths taken by Iselle and Julio, which formed a few days after Iselle and followed a path slightly more to the north.  Iselle's rainfall totals are on the order of 60 to 80 mm (~3 inches) over the southeast coast of Hawaii and upwards of 120 mm (~5 inches) over Kauai.  Locally, up to 14 inches of rain was reported in the higher elevations of the Big Island. 

Julio, which is now a tropical storm, is currently located well north of Oahu (about 500 miles from Honolulu) and expected to continue moving away from Hawaii and steadily weaken.

TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

Text credit:  Stephen Lang
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 


Aug. 10, 2014 - NASA's Terra Satellite Shows a Disheveled Iselle Over Hawaii [image-157]

The Terra satellite's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument shows Iselle over the Hawaiian Islands looking disorganized.  The eyewall is no longer visible in this view. 

At 11:00 pm HST, 0900 UTC, the center of post-tropical cyclone Iselle was located near latitude 20.3 north, longitude 160.8 west. Iselle is moving toward the west near 14 mph, 22 km/h, and this motion is expected to continue for the next 48 hours.  Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph, 55 km/h, with higher gusts. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. Iselle is expected to weaken to a trough by Monday night.

Heavy rainfall associated with the remnant of Iselle will continue, with up to 2 inches of additional rainfall expected. This rain could cause life-threatening flash floods as well as rock and mud slides.  Swells generated by Iselle will gradually diminish through Saturday evening.

Text credit:  Lynn Jenner
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 08, 2014 (#2) - Tropical Storm Iselle Hits Hawaii[image-125]

Hurricane Iselle weakened to a tropical storm while approaching the island of Hawaii on Thursday August 7, 2014. As a tropical storm Iselle contained some heavy rain showers and strong winds when it hit the big island.

Iselle later dropped some heavy rain over Maui and scattered showers extended to Kauai and Oahu.

The TRMM satellite had an excellent view of tropical storm Iselle as it neared the Hawaiian islands on August 8, 2014 at 0152 UTC ( August 7 at 3:52 PM HST). A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments is shown overlaid on a 0200 UTC GOES-WEST image. TRMM's TMI collected data showing that rain was falling at a rate of over 39 mm (1.5 inches) per hour near Iselle's
center.

After crossing the island of Hawaii, Iselle is predicted to continue weakening as its center of circulation passes to the south of the other Hawaiian Islands.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-250][image-234][image-218]Aug. 08, 2014 (#1)TRMM and GOES Satellites See Hurricanes Iselle and Julio Menacing Hawaii

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw both weakening Hurricane Iselle and category two hurricane Julio at the same time on August 7 from its orbit in space because both storms are so close to each other in the Central Pacific Ocean.

Both Iselle and Julio were moving toward the Hawaiian Islands on August 7, 2014 at 0922 UTC (5:22 a.m. EDT) when TRMM passed overhead. TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) instrument collected data as it passed overhead. Microwave brightness temperatures at 85.5 GHZ and at 37.0 GHZ were combined in the red, green and blue components to construct the image. Brightness temperature is a measurement of the radiance of the microwave radiation traveling upward from the top of the atmosphere to the satellite. The brighter the temperature, the more energy is being generated.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of both storms on August 7 at 1800 UTC (2 p.m. EDT) as Iselle was approaching Hawaii and Hurricane Julio followed behind to the east. In the image, Julio appeared to have a better, more organized circulation.

An Air Force reconnaissance aircraft data shows that Iselle is no longer a hurricane and is on a weakening trend.  The eyewall was no longer visible on aircraft radar.  Flight level winds in the storm were near 60 knots and surface winds near 57 knots.  Iselle's forward motion has slowed as a weakness developed within the storm.  A mid and upper level low is forecast to develop within the weakness over the next couple of days that will cause the system to weaken to a shallow low.

Iselle is not expected to survive after it makes landfall on the Big Island due to the interaction with the terrain and the strong shear along its track.  However, if it is able to survive landfall, a new ridge may develop north of the forecast track and it may strengthen again to hurricane strength prior to reaching the international dateline.

At 3:00 am HST, 1300 UTC, the center of tropical storm Iselle was located near latitude 19.2 north, longitude 155.4 west. Iselle is moving toward the west near 10 mph, 17 km/h, and this motion is expected to continue through Saturday, with an increase in forward speed.  Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles, 280 km from the center.

For updated forecasts on Iselle, please visit NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center website at: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc/tcpages/ISELLE.php. For updated forecasts on Hurricane Julio, please visit NOAA's National Hurricane Center website: www.nhc.noaa.gov.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce / Lynn Jenner
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 


Aug. 07, 2014 - NASA Sees Heavy Rainfall in Iselle as the Hurricane Nears Hawaii[image-109][image-204]

A NASA satellite has observed heavy rainfall in Hurricane Iselle on its approach to Hawaii. NASA's TRMM Satellite captured rainfall rates within the storm as it passed overhead. In addition, NASA's Aqua satellite provided a larger view of the Central Pacific Ocean and revealed an image of Hurricane Iselle being chased by Hurricane Julio to the east.

A tropical storm warning has been issued for Kauai County. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center provided an overview of the storm: Iselle is expected to bring heavy rains, high surf and damaging winds. Hurricane conditions are expected to develop on the Big Island of Hawaii today, August 7. Tropical storm conditions are expected to spread to Maui County tonight and to Oahu and Kauai on Friday, August 8.

Hurricane Iselle has weakened from a very dangerous category four hurricane on August 4 to a category one hurricane when NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over on August 6, 2014 at 1020 UTC (6:20 a.m. EDT).

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, rainfall data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) were overlaid on an enhanced infrared image from the NOAA's GOES-West satellite to show the distribution of rainfall within the storm. TRMM TMI showed that heavy rainfall was occurring around the filling eye. TRMM TMI indicated that the most intense rain was falling at a rate of over 43.5 mm (about 1.7 inches) in a band southwest of the eye. 

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that that heavy rainfall is expected to affect Hawaii as Iselle moves through. Rainfall totals of 5 to 8 inches, with isolated maximum amounts to 12 inches, are expected along the track of Iselle. Other conditions expected include very large and damaging surf is expected to rapidly build along east and south facing shores today and tonight, especially on the Big Island. The Big Island windward and Kau are expected to experience storm surge between 1 to 3 feet.

CPHC said the onset of tropical storm conditions is expected on the Big Island of Hawaii this afternoon (August 7), with hurricane conditions expected tonight. Tropical storm conditions are expected over Maui County Tonight (August 7), over Oahu on Friday (August 8) and over Kauai county on Friday afternoon.

On August 6 at 22:30 UTC (6:30 p.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricanes Iselle and Julio approaching Hawaii. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of both storms as the march in a line across the Central and Eastern Pacific.

At 5 a.m. HST (11 a.m. EDT)/1500 UTC) the center of Hurricane Iselle was located near latitude 18.5 north and longitude 150.6 west, about 305 miles (490 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. Iselle was moving toward the west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through Friday, with some slowing in forward speed on Friday night. On the forecast track, the center of Iselle is expected to pass over the Big Island tonight, and pass just south of the smaller islands Friday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 80 mph (130 kph). Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, but Iselle is expected to be near hurricane strength as it makes landfall on the Big Island tonight, August 7.  The estimated minimum central pressure is 986 millibars. For updates from the CPHC, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/.

Hurricane Iselle is predicted to cause tropical storm conditions with potential flash floods in the Hawaiian Islands on Thursday and Friday. Tropical storm Julio is expected to also affect the island chain over the weekend.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Iselle and Julio Moving Toward Hawaii[image-95]


[image-79]Aug. 06, 2014 - NASA Satellite Paints a Triple Hurricane Pacific Panorama

In three passes over the Central and Eastern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Terra satellite took pictures of the three current tropical cyclones, painting a Pacific Tropical Panorama. Terra observed Hurricane Genevieve, Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio in order from west to east. Iselle has now triggered a tropical storm watch in Hawaii.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument is a key instrument aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. Between the two satellites, MODIS instruments view the entire surface of the Earth every one to two days. When NASA's Terra passed over the Central and Eastern Pacific in three swaths (or orbits), it captured images of each storm.

On Aug. 5, at 22:05 UTC (6:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve and Hurricane Iselle in the Central Pacific Ocean, and Hurricane Julio in the  Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Genevieve Revived and Strengthens into a Hurricane

Satellite data shows that the structure of Genevieve has improved rapidly into a hurricane. At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), the center of Tropical Storm Genevieve was located near latitude 12.8 north and longitude 176.8 west. That puts the center of Genevieve about 1,065 miles (1,710 km) south of Midway Island and about 555 miles (895 km) west-southwest of Johnston Island. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that Genevieve is moving toward the west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through Thursday. Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph (120 kph) and Genevieve is expected to become a typhoon in the west Pacific in the next day or two.

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

[image-158]Hurricane Iselle Triggers Watches in Hawaii

NOAA's CPHC issued a Tropical Storm Watch on August 6 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) for Hawaii and Maui Counties in Hawaii. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area within 48 hours.

At 8 a.m. EDT on August 6, Hurricane Iselle was centered near latitude 16.9 north and longitude 144.1 west, about 745 miles (1,200 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. NHC forecasters noted that maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph (145 kph) and gradual weakening is forecast during the next day or two. Iselle is moving toward the west near 13 mph (20 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction for the next day. The estimated minimum central pressure is 989 millibars.

CPHC expects the outer winds of Iselle may reach the easternmost Hawaiian Islands early Thursday afternoon. Heavy rains may bring flash floods and mudslides as Iselle approaches. CPHC noted that large and dangerous swells from Iselle are expected to reach the main Hawaiian Islands today, while winds of tropical storm strength are possible on the Big Island Thursday, August 7.

Julio Now a Hurricane

At 5 a.m. EDT on August 6, Tropical Storm Julio strengthened into the fifth hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season. By 11 a.m. EDT it was centered near latitude 15.2 north and longitude 130.5 west, about 1,650 miles (2,655 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. NHC forecasters noted that maximum sustained winds were near 75 mph (120 kph) and some strengthening is forecast during the next day or two. Julio is moving toward the west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction for the next two days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 989 millibars.

Infrared data from instruments such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a small burst of strong thunderstorms developed with cloud tops of -75C to -80C over Julio's the low-level center of circulation during the morning (of August 6). The created a central dense overcast in the center. In addition, passive microwave satellite imagery has been indicating a closed low-to mid-level eye feature, which indicates that the storm has strengthened.

A Very Slowly Developing System Behind Julio

Trailing to the southeast of Julio is another developing tropical low pressure area called System 98E.  System 98E is actually a trough (elongated area) of low pressure located several hundred miles south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. The low is producing disorganized shower and thunderstorms. System 98E is expected to move to the west then west-northwest over the next couple of days and the National Hurricane Center gives it a very low (10 percent) chance of developing into a tropical depression over that time.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-63][image-96][image-128]Aug. 05, 2014 - NASA Sees Heavy Rain in Hurricane Iselle as it Heads Toward Hawaii

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM flew directly over the eye of powerful Hurricane Iselle and found extremely heavy rainfall rates occurring there.

On August 4, 2014 at 1037 UTC (6:37 a.m. EDT) when TRMM passed over the storm, Iselle had winds of about 120 knots (about 138 mph) at that time making it a dangerous category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Rainfall from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments was overlaid on an enhanced infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite that showed cloud extent. The composite image showed the diameter of the storm and the rate in which rain was falling within it. The TRMM PR saw rain falling at a rate of almost 182 mm (about 7.2 inches) per hour in Iselle's eye wall.

TRMM data was also used to create a 3-D image of the storm to help forecasters see cloud heights. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, a 3-D image was produced using radar reflectivity values from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The 3-D image showed storms in Iselle's eye wall reaching from 13km (8 miles) to the surface of the ocean below.

On August 4 at 19:40 UTC (3:40 p.m. EDT), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took a visible image of Hurricane Iselle that showed a clear, cloud-free eye. The visible image also showed a thick band of powerful thunderstorms circling the eye. The image was created by the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA Goddard.

On August 5, at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) the center of Hurricane Iselle was located near latitude 15.9 north and longitude 138.6 west. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported that Iselle's maximum sustained winds are near 125 mph (205 kph), making Iselle a category three hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane wind scale.  Further weakening is forecast during the next couple of days.

NHC noted that Iselle is moving toward the west near 8 mph (13 kph) and this general motion is expected to continue this morning.  Iselle should turn toward the west-northwest at a faster forward speed later today and Wednesday, August 3. The estimated minimum central pressure is 955 millibars.

Hurricane Iselle is predicted by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) to weaken as it heads westward into the Central Pacific Ocean. Iselle is expected to move over the Big Island as a tropical storm late Thursday, August 5, 2014.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-80]Aug. 04, 2014 - Satellite View of a Hyperactive Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean

NASA and NOAA satellites have been supplying forecasters with data developing tropical cyclones in the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean and over the last several days. There have been as many as five tropical systems at the same time. On Monday, August 4, there were three tropical systems stretching from west to east: Tropical Depression Genevieve in the Central Pacific, Hurricane Iselle and Tropical Storm Julio in the Eastern Pacific.

Tropical Depression Genevieve May Strengthen

On August 4, Tropical Depression Genevieve was located about 930 miles (1,495 km) southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii. Maximum sustained winds were still near 35 mph (55 kph). Genevieve was moving westward at about 16 mph (26 kph). NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasts gradual strengthening late on August 4 and 5, so Genevieve could once again reach tropical storm status.

To the east of Genevieve lies low pressure area known as System 93C. It is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. System 93C is located about 500 miles south of Hilo, Hawaii. This low pressure area is moving to the west at 15 mph and currently has a near zero percent chance of becoming a tropical depression over the next couple of days.

[image-36]Hawaii on Guard for Hurricane Iselle

Behind System 93C to the east, lies Hurricane Iselle, the current powerhouse of the Eastern Pacific.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a clear visible image of Hurricane Iselle in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 3 at 6:05 p.m. EDT. The image revealed Iselle's somewhat cloud-covered eye with bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the eastern quadrant. The image was created by The MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

On August 4 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Hurricane Iselle's maximum sustained winds had increased to near 140 mph (220 kph) Iselle is a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. The eye of Hurricane Iselle was located near latitude 16.2 north and longitude 136.5 west.  Iselle was moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph). The National Hurricane Center noted that gradual weakening is forecast during the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 947 millibars.

The current forecast track from the National Hurricane Center takes a weaker Iselle through the entire chain of Hawaiian Islands from August 7 through August 9.

Newborn Tropical Storm Julio Chasing Iselle

Tropical Storm Julio was born around 11 p.m. EDT on Sunday, August 3, about 795 miles (1,280 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

On August 4 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Julio's maximum sustained winds were near 45 mph (75 kph). The center of Tropical Storm Julio was near latitude 13.5 north and longitude 119.4 west. Julio is moving toward the west near 13 mph (20 kph) and is expected to continue in a west to west-northwestward direction over the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1004 millibars.

Strong northeasterly vertical wind shear is pushing the strongest thunderstorms in Julio to the western side of the storm. The National Hurricane Center noted that the wind shear is expected to continue to August 5 or 6, which will limit any intensification. NHC expects Julio to become a hurricane later this week.

Satellites from NASA and NOAA continue to provide visible, infrared, microwave data to forecasters. Beginning in August, NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission takes to the Atlantic using two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft to study the storms. For more information about NASA's HS3 mission, visit: www.nasa.gov/HS3.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Aug. 01, 2014 - NASA Eyes Powerful Bands of Thunderstorms in Newborn Tropical Storm Iselle

Tropical Storm Iselle was born in the Eastern Pacific Ocean soon after NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery on the storm that showed powerful thunderstorms wrapping into developing storm's center. Iselle is not close enough to land to cause any watches or warnings.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 95E on July 31 at 5:23 p.m. EDT from gathered infrared data before it became Tropical Storm Iselle. The data was made into a false-colored image at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The AIRS data showed a large band of powerful thunderstorms west of Iselle's center wrapping into the storm. The thunderstorms had cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C indicating the cloud tops were near the top of the troposphere.

National Hurricane Center forecaster Blake noted in an August 1 discussion "A recent AMSU microwave pass also suggests that the inner core has become better defined, with perhaps a partial eyewall in the eastern semicircle." Advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU) is a multi-channel microwave radiometer installed on meteorological satellites, including NASA's Aqua satellite that carries the AIRS instrument.

Tropical storm Iselle was born on July 31 at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT). On August 1, Iselle's maximum sustained winds were already up to 60 mph (95 kph).  At 5 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. PDT/0900 UTC).the center of Tropical Storm Iselle was located near latitude 13.5 north and longitude 124.6 west. Iselle is centered about 1,160 miles (1,870 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Iselle was moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to continue moving in that direction over the next couple of days.

Satellite data indicate that tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 105 miles (165 km) from the center, making the storm about 210 miles in diameter.

NHC noted that environmental conditions appear conducive for further strengthening over the next couple of days. Those conditions include light-to-moderate northeasterly shear and warm water.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Iselle to reach hurricane status by August 2.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image of a very active Eastern and Central Pacific.
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image of a very active Eastern and Central Pacific, hosting three tropical cyclones (from left to right) Genevieve, Iselle and Julio.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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TRMM image of Iselle
NASA's TRMM Satellite found storms in Iselle's eye wall reaching from 13km (8 miles) high and very heavy rain falling at a rate of almost 182 mm (about 7.2 inches) per hour in Iselle's eye wall.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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On Aug. 5, at 22:05 UTC (6:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve (left), Hurricane Iselle (center), and Hurricane Julio (right) in the Central and  Eastern Pacific Oceans.
On Aug. 5, at 22:05 UTC (6:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve (left), Hurricane Iselle (center), and Hurricane Julio (right) in the Central and Eastern Pacific Oceans.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from August 2 through 7 shows the movement of Hurricanes Iselle (left) and Julio (right) toward the Hawaiian Islands.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Iselle and Julio head towards Hawaii in this MODIS image
On August 6 at 22:30 UTC (6:30 p.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricanes Iselle and Julio approaching Hawaii. This image was created using three satellite passes.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM image of Iselle over Hawaii
The TRMM satellite had an excellent view of tropical storm Iselle as it neared the Hawaiian islands on August 8, 2014.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Image Credit: 
NASA/Hal Pierce, SSAI
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Terra image of Iselle over the Hawaiian Islands
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of a disorganized Iselle over the Hawaiian Islands.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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AIRS image of Iselle
This false-colored image represents infrared data on Tropical Storm Iselle on July 31 at 5:23 p.m. EDT from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL
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Hurricane Iselle
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Hurricane Iselle (09E) in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 3 at 6:05 p.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Iselle
On August 4 at 19:40 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took this visible image of Hurricane Iselle in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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NASA's TRMM Satellite found storms in Iselle's eye wall reaching from 13km (8 miles) high and very heavy rain falling at a rate of almost 182 mm (about 7.2 inches) per hour in Iselle's eye wall.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Iselle in the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Iselle in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM satellite rainfall data overlaid on an enhanced infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows heavy rainfall occurring around the Iselle's eye. The most intense rain was falling at a rate of over 43.5 mm (about 1.7 inches) in a band southwest of the eye.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Iselle
On August 9 at 23:15 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this visible image of Hurricane Iselle in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM image of Iselle and Julio
The TRMM satellite saw both weakening Hurricane Iselle and category two Hurricane Julio in the same orbit as they were moving toward the Hawaiian islands on August 7, 2014.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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This GOES-West satellite image from August 7 at 1800 UTC (2 p.m. EDT) shows Hurricane Iselle approaching Hawaii and Hurricane Julio behind to the east.
This GOES-West satellite image from August 7 at 1800 UTC (2 p.m. EDT) shows Hurricane Iselle approaching Hawaii and Hurricane Julio behind to the east.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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TRMM satellite passed over Iselle the center was passing well south of the far western islands of Kauai and Ni'ihau.
On Aug. 9 at 0906 UTC (5:06 a.m. EDT) when NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Iselle the center was passing well south of the far western islands of Kauai and Ni'ihau. The exposed center of Iselle was devoid of any eyewall or even rain.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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TRMM was used to create a 3-D image of the storm looking north.
On Aug. 9 at 0906 UTC (5:06 a.m. EDT) TRMM was used to create a 3-D image of the storm looking north. Areas in green show that much of the rain is relatively shallow with tops ranging from about 5 to 8 km, but there are isolated areas of higher tops (shown in red).
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Rainfall rate map for the period Aug. 4 to 11
Rainfall estimates for the period Aug. 4 to 11 for the Hawaiian Islands. Two swaths of heavier rain show the paths of Iselle and Julio. Iselle's rainfall totaled 60 to 80 mm (~3 inches, green) over the southeast coast of Hawaii and upwards of 120 mm (~5 inches, red) over Kauai.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: August 12th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner