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Ingrid (Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico)
September 18, 2013

Mexico Flooded by Hurricane Ingrid and Tropical Storm Manuel[image-140]

Mexico's Pacific and Gulf coasts were both inundated by deadly tropical rainfall at the same time. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM measured rainfall rates from space, and those were tallied on a rainfall map.

Tropical storm Manuel dropped extremely heavy rainfall along Mexico's Pacific coast. At least 55 people have been reported killed in Mexico due to flooding and landslides caused by extreme rainfall. Hurricane Ingrid weakened to a tropical storm and came ashore from the Gulf of Mexico into the state of Tamaulipas near La Pesca, Mexico on Monday September 16, 2013.

The TRMM-based, near-real time Multi- satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. is used to monitor rainfall over the global tropics. MPA rainfall totals are shown over Mexico for the period 9-18 September 2013. The highest rainfall totals for tropical storm Manuel, of over 350mm (~14 inches), were located along the Pacific coast.

Hal Pierce
SSAI / NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

 


Sept. 17, 2013

NASA's TRMM Satellite Animation Gives Flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's Heavy Rains   [image-110]

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM can compile the rain in which rain is falling as it orbits from space. When it passed over Tropical Storm Ingrid on Sept. 16 TRMM gathered data and it was used to create a NASA 3-D flyby of the storm.

When NASA's TRMM satellite flew over Tropical Storm Ingrid on Sept. 16, it was drenching the Atlantic side in the Gulf of Mexico.  On Sept. 16, Hurricane Ingrid weakened to a tropical storm and came ashore from the Gulf of Mexico into the state of Tamaulipas near La Pesca, Mexico. Today, Sept. 17, Ingrid's heavy rainfall continues as the storm weakened to a remnant low pressure area over eastern Mexico.[image-126]

TRMM satellite data from Sept. 16 at 0227 UTC (Sept. 15 at 10:27 p.m. EDT) were used to create a 3-D image of Ingrid's rainfall. That 3-D image of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall showed heaviest rainfall appeared over the Gulf of Mexico, where rain was falling at a rate of 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Moderate rainfall stretched from the Gulf northwest and inland over eastern Mexico.   

The National Hurricane Center issued the final advisory on the remnants of Ingrid on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 5 a.m. EDT. At that time Ingrid's remnants were located near latitude 23.7 north and longitude 99.9 west about 50 miles/75 km west of Ciudad Victoria, Mexico. The remnant low pressure area and associated showers and thunderstorms were moving westward at 5 mph/ 7 kph. Ingrid's maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 25 mph/35 kph.[image-94]

The National Hurricane Center noted that the remnants of Ingrid are expected to produce 10 to 15 inches of rain over a large part of eastern Mexico with isolated amounts of 25 inches possible, especially in areas of mountainous terrain. That rainfall from Ingrid's remnants is expected to cause flooding and mud-slides over eastern Mexico for the next few days.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sept. 16, 2013 - Tropical Storm Ingrid Makes Landfall in Northeastern Mexico [image-78]

Tropical Storm Ingrid made landfall in La Pesca located in northeastern Mexico on Monday, Sept. 16. NASA's TRMM satellite found heavy rainfall occurring in the storm before its center made landfall.  A tropical storm warning is in effect for Cabo Rojo northward to Rio San Fernando.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ingrid on Sept. 16 at 0227 UTC/Sept. 15 at 10:27 p.m. EDT and measured its rainfall rates from space. Some of the heaviest rainfall was occurring in the center of the storm at a rate of over 2 inches/50 mm per hour. TRMM measured rainfall beginning from as high as 14 km, so cloud tops are higher than that.

On Sept. 16 at 8 a.m. EDT, Ingrid's maximum sustained winds have decreased from hurricane-force to near 65 mph/100 kph and additional weakening is forecast as the storm moves inland today. The National Hurricane Center noted that the center of Tropical Storm Ingrid was located just inland near latitude 23.8 north and longitude 97.8 west, directly over La Pesca, Mexico. Ingrid was moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph/17 kph and a turn to the west then west-southwest. 

The heavy rainfall rates that TRMM observed is the main threat from Ingrid, especially as the storm moves inland over the mountainous areas. The National Hurricane Center noted that Ingrid is expected to produce 10 to 15 inches of rain over a large part of eastern Mexico with isolated amounts of 25 inches possible. 

Ingrid will continue to move inland over Mexico and is expected to weaken as it moves over mountainous terrain over the next couple of days. Some of the mountains in the Sierra Madre Oriental range are over 10,000 feet high. The range spans 620 miles/1,000 kilometers. The Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains extend from the Rio Grande, Texas through the Mexican states of Nuevo León, southwest Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosí, Querétaro, and Hidalgo to northern Puebla. Heavy rains in the mountains are likely to cause flash floods and mudslides.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Sept. 13, 2013 - Satellite Sees System 93L Become Tropical Storm Ingrid, Now Soaking Eastern Mexico   [image-51]

NASA and NOAA satellites have been tracking the progression of low pressure System 93L through the Caribbean Sea and into the southwestern Gulf of Mexico over a week's time, and it became Tropical Storm Ingrid mid-day on Sept. 13.  NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image of Ingrid's center over the Bay of Campeche.

NOAA's GOES-East satellite sits in a fixed orbit and covers weather over the eastern U.S. and Atlantic Ocean, providing imagery continuously. NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created an image of Tropical Storm Ingrid at 1555 UTC/11:55 a.m. EDT, less than one hour after it was named. The image showed that clouds associated with Ingrid covered the Bay of Campeche, located in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. Strong thunderstorms circled the center of the storm and the storm is expected to move slowly along the coast while its center stays over water over the next couple of days, bringing large amounts of rainfall to eastern Mexico.

System 93L strengthened into the tenth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean season and by 11 a.m. EDT, strengthened further to become the ninth tropical storm. Tropical Depression Eight was the only depression that did not achieve tropical storm status this year so far.

At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Ingrid was centered just 60 miles/95 km east-northeast of Veracruz, Mexico, and 175 miles/280 km southeast of Tuxpan, Mexico. That puts Ingrid's center near 19.4 north and 95.3 west. Ingrid had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph/75 kph and strengthening is possible over the next two days as Ingrid moves from a western track to a north-northwestern track. Ingrid's center is expected to move very close to the coast over the next couple of days. Tropical storm-force winds extend 35 miles/55 km from the center, making the compact storm just 70 miles/110 km in diameter.

A tropical storm warning is in effect for Coatzacoalcos to Cabo Rojo, and a tropical storm watch is in effect for north of Cabo Rojo to La Pesca.

Based on the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) expected track for Ingrid' over the next couple of days,  eastern Mexico should prepare for a heavy soaking. The NHC noted that Ingrid is expected to produce 10 to 15 inches of rain over a large part of eastern Mexico with isolated amounts of 25 inches possible, especially in areas of mountainous terrain. These rains are likely to result in life-threatening flash floods and mudslides. Tropical-storm-force winds are expected within the warning area later in the day on Sept. 13.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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[image-36]
GOES image of Ingrid
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Ingrid at 11:55 a.m. EDT on Sept. 13. Clouds associated with Ingrid covered the Bay of Campeche and strong thunderstorms circled the center of the storm.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image-51]
TRMM image of Ingrid
TRMM measured rainfall in Tropical Storm Ingrid on Sept. 15 at 10:27 p.m. EDT and found some heavy rainfall (red) around its center. Mexican states are labeled on this image. Credit:
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA
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[image-78]
MODIS image of Ingrid
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Ingrid over Mexico on Sept. 16 at 1945 UTC/3:45 p.m. EDT as it continued to soak northeaster Mexico. The northern extent of Ingrid's clouds stretch over southern Texas.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-94]
TRMM 3D image of Ingrid
This 3-D image of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall was created from TRMM satellite data for Sept. 16. Heaviest rainfall appears in red towers over the Gulf of Mexico, while moderate rainfall stretched from there inland over eastern Mexico.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-110]
Youtube Override: 
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This 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall was created from TRMM satellite data for Sept. 16. Heaviest rainfall appears in red towers over the Gulf of Mexico, while moderate rainfall stretched from there inland over eastern Mexico.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-126]
rainfall map of Ingrid and Manuel
Image Credit: 
Hal Pierce, SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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[image-140]
Page Last Updated: September 18th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner