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Hagupit (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
December 12, 2014

[image-492]NASA Sees Tropical Depression Hagupit Winding Down

The final advisory on Tropical Depression Hagupit was issued late on Dec. 11 and on Dec. 12, NASA's Terra satellite saw the storm's center spinning down off the coast of southern Vietnam.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite took a visible picture of Hagupit on Dec. 12 at 03:00 UTC (Dec. 11 at 10 p.m. EST). The image showed that clouds were only on the north and western sides of the center of circulation. Some of the clouds associated with the northern circulation stretched over southeastern Vietnam.

On Dec. 12 at 0000 UTC (Dec. 11 at 7 p.m. EST), Tropical Depression Hagupit's maximum sustained winds were near 25 knots. It was centered near 10.8 north and 110.0 east, about 194 nautical miles east of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Hagupit was moving to the south-southwest at 17 knots. 

Hagupit is expected to dissipate today, December 12.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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[image-474]Dec. 11, 2014 - NASA Sees Hagupit Weaken to a Depression Enroute to Vietnam

The once mighty super typhoon has weakened to a depression in the South China Sea as it heads for a final landfall in southern Vietnam. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the storm that showed it was weakening.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hagupit on Dec. 11 at 05:20 UTC (12:20 a.m. EST) and the MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm. The MODIS image showed that the thunderstorms had become fragmented around the circulation center.

On Dec. 11 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Tropical Depression Hagupit's maximum sustained winds dropped to 30 knots (34 mph/55 kph). It was centered near 12.8 north longitude and 110.9 east latitude, about 314 nautical miles (361 miles/581 km) east-northeast of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. It was moving to the west at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

The Vietnam National Centre for Hydro-meteorological forecasting has issued a tropical depression warning for southern Vietnam. For the latest forecasts and warnings, visit:  http://www.nchmf.gov.vn/Web/en-US/104/102/24189/Default.aspx

Hagupit is moving west-southwest toward southern Vietnam, where final landfall is expected around Dec. 12 at 0000 UTC. The system is forecast to dissipate quickly after landfall.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-438][image-456]NASA Satellite Data Shows Hagupit Dropped Almost 19 Inches of Rainfall

Typhoon Hagupit soaked the Philippines, and a NASA rainfall analysis indicated the storm dropped almost 19 inches in some areas. After Hagupit departed the Philippines as a tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite passed over and captured a picture of the storm curled up like a cat waiting to pounce when it landfalls in Vietnam on Dec. 11.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite, managed by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency gathered over a week of rainfall data on Hagupit. That rainfall data along with data from other satellites was compiled into an analysis to determine how much rain fell over various areas of the Philippines and surrounding areas.

On Dec. 8, the TRMM team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland performed a preliminary rainfall analysis and updated it on Dec. 9. The analysis of rainfall from Dec. 1-9, 2014) showed rainfall totals of over 450 mm (17.5 inches) in a few areas in the eastern Philippines near where Hagupit came ashore. Even greater rainfall totals of over 477 mm (18.7 inches) were analyzed over the open waters of the Philippine Sea east of Manila.

Manila received moderate to heavy rainfall but avoided extremely heavy precipitation as Hagupit (Ruby) moved past to the south of the capital. Rainfall amounts of over 200mm (almost 8 inches) were prevalent from southern Luzon through eastern Samar. 

On Dec. 10 at 03:10 UTC (Dec. 9 at 10:10 p.m. EST), NASA's Terra satellite captured a view of Tropical Storm Hagupit in the South China Sea. In the visible image, Hagupit appeared to be curled up as thunderstorms surrounded the center, and extended in a wide band to the northeast of the center. Hagupit's center was almost in the middle of the South China Sea between the Philippines to the east and Vietnam to the west.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), Hagupit's maximum sustained winds remained at 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph), the same strength they were on Dec. 9. Hagupit was centered near 13.6 north longitude and 114.7 east latitude, or about 533 nautical miles (613.4 miles/987.1 km) east-northeast of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The storm was moving to the west at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph).

Hagupit is now predicted by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center to continue weakening and make landfall in southern Vietnam mid-day Dec. 11 (EST) or just after midnight local time in Vietnam. A Severe Tropical Storm Warning is currently in effect for southern Vietnam.

For the latest forecasts and warnings from the Vietnam National Centre for Hydro-meteorological forecasting, visit: 

http://www.nchmf.gov.vn/Web/en-US/104/102/24189/Default.aspx

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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[image-420]NASA Measures Typhoon Hagupit's Philippine Rainfall from Space

As of Dec. 8, Super Typhoon Hagupit has caused up to 27 deaths. Early reports indicate the Philippines has been spared the widespread destruction caused by Super Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. Hagupit (called Ruby in the Philippines) forward motion slowed on December 4, 2014 before reaching the Philippines. After hitting Samar in the eastern Philippines Hagupit's continued slow movement resulted in high rainfall amounts along the typhoon's track. These high rainfall totals meant that flooding occurred frequently along the typhoon's track.

When NASA/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over Hagupit on December 8, 2014 at 0132 UTC (Dec. 7 at 8:32 p.m. EST) its Microwave Imager (TMI) instrument collected data used in a rainfall analysis. The slow moving typhoon had weakened to a tropical storm but was still dropping light to moderate rainfall. Its center appeared to be in the northern Sibuyan Sea, located between the islands of the central and northern Philippines.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland the TRMM science team created a preliminary analysis of rainfall from December 1 through 8, 2014) using merged satellite rainfall data (from TRMM and other satellites) Rainfall totals of over 450 mm (17.5 inches) were found in a few areas in the eastern Philippines near where Hagupit came ashore. Rainfall amounts of over 200mm (almost 8 inches) were common. 

The International Space Station-RapidScat instrument captured data on Hagupit's winds on Dec. 8 at 08:30 UTC (3:30 a.m. EST/4:30 p.m. Manila local time). The RapidScat image showed sustained winds of 45 to 50 mph east of Luzon, over the Philippine Sea.

On Dec. 8 at 05:35 UTC NASA's Aqua satellite saw the center of Tropical Storm Hagupit in the South China Sea, east of the Philippines Region IV-B of Mimaropa.

By 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST/11 p.m. local Manila time) on Dec. 8, Hagupit's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was centered near 13.4 north longitude and 118.1 east latitude. That's about 157 nautical miles (181 miles/291 km) west-southwest of Manila and in the South China Sea. Hagupit was moving to the west at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph) and is expected turn to the west-southwest over the next two days.

Hagupit is expected to maintain tropical storm strength over the next day before weakening to a tropical depression upon its approach to southern Vietnam. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect that the storm will make landfall near Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam as a depression early on Dec. 12.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-330][image-348]NASA Catches Three Days of Typhoon Hagupit's Motion Over Philippines

NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites flew over Typhoon Hagupit from Dec. 6 through Dec. 8 and the MODIS instrument that flies aboard both satellites provided images of the storm as it moved through the country.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite caught a picture of Hagupit on Dec. 6 before it made landfall. On Dec. 7, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took an image of the storm as it was making landfall in the eastern Philippines.

On Dec. 8 at 04:50 UTC (Dec. 7 at 11:50 p.m. EST) when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical cyclone again, it had weakened to a tropical storm and was located over Luzon in the northern Philippines. The image showed that Hagupit's cloud extent had grown and it covered the northern and central Philippines, extending south into Mindanao. Although the center was difficult to find in the image, it appeared that it was centered in the Sulu Sea, which lies in the middle of the Philippine islands.

On Dec. 6 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST/11 p.m. local time, Manila), Tropical Storm Hagupit, known in the Philippines a Tropical Storm Ruby, had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). It was centered near 13.8 north longitude and 121.3 east latitude, just 51 nautical miles (58.6 miles/94.4 km) south-southeast of Manila. It was moving to the west-northwest at 6 knots (6.9 mph/11.1 kph).

Warnings that remain in effect in the Philippines on Dec. 8 include:  Public storm warning signal #2 in the following provinces: In Luzon: Metro Manila, Batangas, Cavite, Bataan, Laguna, Southern Quezon, Marinduque, Northern Oriental Mindoro including Lubang Island.

Public storm warning signal #1 remains in effect in the following provinces: Luzon: Zambales, Pampanga, Tarlac, Bulacan, Rizal, Rest of Quezon, Rest of Mindoro Provinces, Romblon.  For the updated forecast from PAGASA, visit: http://pagasa.dost.gov.ph/index.php/tropical-cyclone/weather-bulletin-up....

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center project that Hagupit's current weakening trend will continue as the storm passes into the South China Sea. Once there, unfavorable atmospheric conditions of cooler, drier air will weaken the storm further. It is expected to reach Ho Chi Minh City in southern Vietnam by Dec. 11 as a depression.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-294]Dec. 07, 2014 - NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Typhoon Hagupit Over the Philippines

Typhoon Hagupit came ashore in the Bicol and eastern Visayas region of the Philippines early on Dec. 7 and slowly tracked to the west, bringing typhoon-force winds, heavy rainfall, and dangerous storm surge. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the storm covering the central and extending into the northern part of the country.

On Dec. 7 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST/11 p.m. local time, Manila), Typhoon Hagupit (known as Ruby in the Philippines) was moving through the north central Philippines. It was located near 12.6 north longitude and 123.7 east latitude (in the Sulu Sea) and about 228 nautical miles southeast of Manila. Hagupit was moving to the northwest at 5 knots. Maximum sustained winds had decreased to 75 knots and further weakening is expected as it passes south of Manila and exits into the South China Sea.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 7 at 5:23 UTC (12:23 a.m. EST) and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured a visible picture of the storm. The VIIRS instrument revealed strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation with an almost indistinguishable center. The eye of the storm was no longer visible. The storm covered the northern and central Philippines.

According to PAGASA, the Philippine forecast authority for the typhoon the local forecast is: Expected third landfall: Northern Mindoro between 6 – 8 pm tomorrow (Dec. 8 local time) and it will be associated with strong winds, storm surge and moderate to heavy rainfall. Effects of Typhoon Ruby will be felt in Metro Manila starting tomorrow and will peak at around 8 – 10 pm (local time). Estimated rainfall amount is from 5 – 15 mm (0.2 to 0.6 inches) per hour (moderate – heavy) within the 450 km (279 miles) diameter of the typhoon.

The following warnings were in effect on Dec. 7: Public storm warning signal #3 is in force in the following provinces: Luzon: Marinduque, Romblon, Masbate, Burias Island, Ticao Island, Oriental Mindoro.

   Public storm warning signal #2 is in force in the following provinces:

Visayas: Northern Samar, Samar, Biliran, Aklan, Capiz, Northern Cebu, Cebu City, Bantayan Island, Camotes Island. In Luzon: Sorsogon, Albay, Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Lubang Island, Quezon, Occidental Mindoro, Camarines Norte & Sur

   Public storm warning signal #1 is in force in the following provinces: Visayas: Iloilo, Antique, Guimaras, Negros Occidental & Oriental, Eastern Samar, Leyte,Southern Leyte, rest of Cebu. In Luzon: Zambales, Bataan, Nueva Ecija, Tarlac, Pampanga, Bulacan, Metro Manila, Rizal, Catanduanes, Northern Palawan

For updated forecasts from PAGASA, visit: http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/index.php/tropical-cyclone/weather-bulleti...

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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Dec. 06, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Hagupit Crawling toward Landfall

Typhoon Haugpit slowed on its approach to the central Philippines and as of 10:30 a.m. EST (15:30 UTC) on Dec. 6 had still not made landfall. Hagupit is known locally in the Philippines as Typhoon Ruby. NASA's Aqua satellite, NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite and NASA's RapidScat instrument provided forecasters with visible data, rainfall rates, cloud heights and wind data to update their forecasts. Many warnings are in effect throughout the Philippines.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center and PAGASA (the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration), Typhoon Hagupit (Ruby) has weakened. On Dec. 6 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST/11 p.m. local time, Manila), Hagupit's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 110 knots (126 mph/203 kph). Further weakening is expected after the storm makes landfall. Today and tomorrow, Hagupit continues to threaten the northern and Eastern Samar Provinces.

[image-312]Hagupit was centered near 12.1 north longitude and 125.5 east latitude, about 321 nautical miles east-southeast of Manila, Philippines. The storm was also 100 km East of Dolores, Eastern Samar and 195 km East of Catarman, Northern Samar, according to PAGASA. It was moving to the west at 8 knots (.2 mph/14.8 kph).

Haugpit's strong winds were creating large and damaging waves along the Philippines' east coast. Wave heights were reaching 40 feet (12.1 meters). PAGASA noted today, Dec. 6 and tomorrow, Dec. 7 (local time) the typhoon will bring rough to very rough sea conditions over the seaboards of Northern Luzon, eastern seaboard of Central and Southern Luzon, seaboards of Visayas and over northern and eastern seaboards of Mindanao. Fishermen and those using small seacraft are advised not to venture out over the said seaboards.

The RapidScat ocean wind radar on the International Space Station gathered data about Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 4 and 5 as it nearing the Philippines. The typhoon force winds circled the center.
NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite flew almost directly above dangerous typhoon Hagupit on December 5, 2014 at 1032 UTC (5:32 a.m. EST/6:32 p.m. Manila time) as the typhoon was approaching the Philippines. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument measured rain falling at a rate of over 76 mm (almost 3 inches) per hour in the typhoon's eye wall.

A 3-D view of Hagupit's precipitation structure was made using data from the Ku band on GPM's dual frequency radar instrument (DPR). DPR showed that some tall thunderstorm in Hagiput's eye wall were reaching heights of almost 15 km (about 9.3 miles).

On Dec. 6 at 05:00 UTC (12 a.m. EST/1 p.m. Manila local time), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite took a visible picture of the storm as it was approaching Eastern Visayas. The image showed that the eye had become cloud-filled.

The following warnings are currently in effect: Public storm warning signal #3 is in force in the following provinces: Visayas: Northern and Eastern Samar, Samar, Biliran and for Luzon: Catanduanes, Albay, Burias Island, Sorsogon, Ticao Island and Masbate

Public storm warning signal #2 is in force in the following provinces: Visayas: Aklan, Capiz, northern Cebu, including Cebu City, Bantayan Island, Leyte and southern Leyte and Luzon: Camarines Sur and Romblon

Public storm warning signal #1 is in force in the following provinces: Visayas: Iloilo, Antique, Guimaras, northern Negros, rest of Cebu, Bohol and Mindanao: Surigao del Norte, Siargao Island and Dinagat province; and Luzon: Camarines Norte, southern Quezon, Batangas, Marinduque, Mindoro Oriental & Occidental.

For the latest updates, visit: http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/tropical-cyclone/weather-bulletin-update

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 


[image-222][image-240][image-258]Dec. 05, 2014 - NASA Analyzes Super Typhoon Hagupit's Rains and Wind on Philippine Approach

Super Typhoon Hagupit is forecast to make landfall in the eastern Philippines bringing heavy rainfall, damaging winds and storm surge. NASA/JAXA's TRMM satellite and the RapidScat instrument provided rainfall and wind data, while NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. In the Philippines, Hagupit is known locally as "Typhoon Ruby."

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite caught a good view of Super Typhoon Hagupit on December 4, 2014 at 1721 UTC (12:21 p.m. EST) when its sustained winds were estimated at over 145 knots (166.8 mph). TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) showed that the heaviest rainfall was just southwest of a well-defined eye. 

About three hours later the International Space Station-RapidScat instrument captured data on Hagupit's winds. The RapidScat image showed sustained winds of at least 30 meters per second (67 mph/108 kph) around the eye of the storm.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Super Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 5 at 4:22 UTC (Dec. 4 at 11:22 p.m. EDT) and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite or VIIRS instrument aboard captured a visible image of the storm. The VIIRS image showed a symmetric ring of intense thunderstorms surrounding the 12-nautical-mile-wide eye.

VIIRS is a scanning radiometer that collects visible and infrared imagery and "radiometric" measurements. Basically it means that VIIRS data is used to measure cloud and aerosol properties, ocean color, sea and land surface temperature, ice motion and temperature, fires, and Earth's albedo (reflected light).

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on Dec. 5, Super Typhoon Hagupit's maximum sustained winds were near 130 knots (149.6 mph/241 kph), down from 150 knots (172 mph/277.8 kph). Typhoon-force winds extend out 40 nautical miles (46 miles/74 km) from the center, while tropical-storm-force winds extend out to 120 miles (138 miles/222 km).

Hagupit was centered near 12.1 north longitude and 128.2 east latitude, about 465 nautical miles (535 miles/861 km) southeast of Manila, Philippines. Hagupit continued moving in a west-northwesterly direction. The storm is generating very rough and dangerous seas with wave heights to 45 feet (13.7 meter).

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) forecast, Super Typhoon Hagupit will "maintain intensity until it starts interacting with land near 24 hours (1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST on Dec. 6) then the system will begin rapidly weakening."

Many warnings are in effect throughout the Philippines. Public storm warning signal #2 is in effect in the following provinces: Visayas: Northern and eastern Samar, Samar, Biliran, Leyte, southern Leyte, northern Cebu and Cebu City, Bantayan Island and Camotes Island. In Luzon, signal #2 is in effect for: Albay, Sorsogon, Ticao Island and Masbate.

Public storm warning signal #1 is in effect in the Province of Visayas including: Capiz, Iloilo, Antique, Guimaras, Aklan, Negros Oriental & Occidental, rest of Cebu, Siquijor and Bohol. Signal #1 is also in effect in the Mindanao Province for Surigao del Sur, & Norte, Misamis Oriental, Agusan del Sur & Norte, Dinagat Island and Camiguin Island; and in the Province of Luzon, including: Catanduanes, Camarines Norte & Sur, Burias Island and Romblon.

On Dec. 5 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) the latest update from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration known as PAGASA called for expected landfall on Saturday evening (Dec. 6) or Sunday morning (Dec. 7) over the Eastern Samar – Northern Samar area and it will be associated with strong winds, storm surge (up to 4 meters) and heavy-intense rainfall.

PAGASA noted:

• "Estimated rainfall amount is from 7.5 – 20 mm per hour (heavy – intense) within the 600 km diameter of the typhoon.

• Ruby (Hagupit) and the Northeast Monsoon will bring rough to very rough sea conditions over the seaboards of Northern Luzon, eastern seaboard of Central and Southern Luzon, seaboards of Visayas and over northern and eastern seaboards of Mindanao. Fishermen and those using small seacraft are advised not to venture out over the said seaboards."

For more information and updates visit: www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph or http://meteopilipinas.gov.ph/map.php.

Hagupit is tracking generally westward along the southwestern edge of a subtropical ridge (elongated area) of high pressure which is located south of Japan. Over the next three days, Hagupit is forecast to track west to west-northwest under the influence of that area of high pressure.     

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Dec. 04, 2014 - NASA Observes Super Typhoon Hagupit; Philippines Under Warnings

[image-150][image-168][image-186][image-204]Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Super Typhoon Hagupit to reach peak intensity today, Dec. 4, and although expected to weaken, will remain a Category 4 typhoon when it approaches the east central Philippines. NASA's Terra satellite and NASA/JAXA's GPM and TRMM satellites have been providing forecasters with valuable data on the storm. Computer models have varied on their track for the storm based on the strength of an upper-level system, so satellite data is extremely valuable in helping determine where Hagupit will move.

On Dec. 3, typhoon Hagupit was moving from near Palau toward the Philippines when it was examined by two satellites managed by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency known as JAXA. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite passed over Hagupit and gathered rainfall and cloud height data.

The TRMM satellite traveled directly over Typhoon Hagupit's eye on December 3, 2014 at 0342 UTC (Dec. 2 at 10:42 p.m. EST). The GPM (core satellite) had a good view of Hagupit later at 1041 UTC (5:41 a.m. EST) Rainfall data captured at that time with GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument shows that rain was falling at a rate of over 138 mm (~5.4 inches) per hour in the western side of Hagupit's eye.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland the data from the Ku band on GPM's dual frequency radar instrument (DPR) was used to create a 3-D image. The Ku band radar swath showed powerful thunderstorms reaching heights of over 15.8 km (9.8 miles) in feeder bands west of Typhoon Hagupit's eye.

On Dec. 4 at 02:10 UTC, the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took a visible image of Super Typhoon Hagupit approaching the Philippines. The MODIS image showed a clear eye surrounded by strong thunderstorms and bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the low-level center. The image also showed that the bulk of strongest thunderstorms were being pushed slightly west of the center as a result of easterly wind shear.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Typhoon Hagupit's maximum sustained winds were near 150 knots (172.6 mph/ 277.8 kph). Currently, typhoon-force winds of 64 knots (74 mph/118.5 kph) or higher occur out to 55 miles of the center.  Tropical Storm-force winds of 34 knots (39 mph/63 kph) or higher occur within 85 to 140 miles of the center. The eye was centered near 11.1 north longitude and 130.9 east latitude, about 640 nautical miles (736 miles/1,185 km) east-southeast of Manila, Philippines. Hagupit was moving to the west-northwest at 12 knots 13.8 mph/22.2 kph).

Warnings in Effect

Philippines warnings in effect as of Dec. 4 include: Public storm warning signal #2 for the following provinces: Visayas: Northern and eastern Samar, Samar, Biliran, Leyte and southern Leyte

Mindanao: Dinagat Island and Siargao Island. And public storm warning signal #1 in effect for the following provinces: Visayas: Northern Cebu including Bantayan island, Camotes island and Bohol; Mindanao: Surigao del Norte & Sur, Camiguin Island and Agusan del Norte; Luzon: Catanduanes, Albay, Sorsogon, Ticao Island and Masbate.

Current Forecast Track from the JTWC

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) current forecast track for Super Typhoon Hagupit projects the eye of the typhoon just over the northeastern tip of Eastern Visayas on Dec. 6 before making landfall over the Bicol region on Dec. 7. The storm is forecast to continue tracking in a northwesterly direction thereafter.

Maximum sustained winds at the time of approach to Eastern Visayas are expected be at Category 4 strength on the Saffir-Simpson scale, although the interaction with land is expected to continue weakening the storm.  

The JTWC forecast calls for Hagupit to remain at typhoon strength as it crosses the Philippines and moves into the South China Sea.

Question in the Forecast Track

As of Dec. 4, not all computer models agree on the exact track the storm will take because of an area of low pressure forecast to move in from the north. Some computer models project that the low pressure system will be strong and would take Hagupit on a more westerly direction over the Central Philippines. Other computer models are projecting that the low pressure area to the north of Hagupit will not be so strong, which will allow the storm to maintain movement in a northwesterly direction.

As satellites gather more information, computer models will update atmospheric conditions that will steer the storm and forecasters will reassess the track as Hagupit nears the Philippines over the next couple of days.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland


Dec. 3, 2014 - NASA Tracks Intensifying Typhoon Hagupit

[image-114][image-132]Typhoon Hagupit continues to intensify as it continued moving through Micronesia on Dec. 3 triggering warnings. NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the strengthening storm while the Rapidscat instrument aboard the International Space Station provided information about the storm's winds.

The International Space Station-RapidScat instrument monitors ocean winds to provide essential measurements used in weather predictions, including hurricanes. "RapidScat measures wind speed and direction over the ocean surface and captured an image of Hagupit when it was a tropical storm on Dec 2 at 8:50 a.m. GMT," said Doug Tyler of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. "The growing storm, north of New Guinea and headed for the Philippines, already had 25 meters/second winds (50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 kph)."

A typhoon and tropical storm warning are in effect in Micronesia, in addition to a typhoon watch as Hagupit marches through Micronesia on a west-northwesterly track. A typhoon warning is in effect for Yap and Ngulu in Yap state, and a typhoon watch and tropical storm warning is in effect for Kayangel in the Republic of Palau. In addition, a tropical storm warning is in effect for Koror in the Republic of Palau.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 3 at 04:30 UTC (Dec. 2 at 11:30 p.m. EST) as it moved through Micronesia in the western Pacific Ocean. The image showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms around the center with bands of thunderstorms spiraling into it. 

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on Dec. 3, Typhoon Hagupit's maximum sustained winds had increased to 100 knots 115.1 mph/185.2 kph). Typhoon-strength winds extend 30 nautical miles (34.5 miles/55.5 km) out from the center, while tropical storm force winds extend up to 120 nautical miles (138 miles/222 km). 

The typhoon was centered near 8.7 north longitude and 138.3 east latitude, just 91 nautical miles (104.7 miles/168.5 km) west-southwest of the island of Yap. The typhoon is kicking up very rough seas with wave heights to 34 feet (10.3 meters). It was moving to the west-northwest at 18 knots (20.7 mph/33.4 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expect that Hagupit will continue to move west-northwest through Micronesia while intensifying to a Category four typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale peaking at 130 knots (149.6 mph/240 kph) over the next two days before it starts to weaken. The JTWC forecast calls for the typhoon to turn to the northwest and stay to the east of the Philippines.

For more information about Rapidscat, visit: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/iss-rapidscat/

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-96]Dec. 02, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Hagupit as Micronesia Posts Warnings

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of Typhoon Hagupit in the western North Pacific Ocean on December 2, when several warnings were in effect for islands in Micronesia.

Micronesia warnings include a Typhoon Warning for Woleai, Yap and Ngulu in Yap state, a Typhoon Watch posted for Faraulep, Fais and Ulithi in Yap state, and a Tropical Storm Warning for Faraulep in Yap state.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hagupit on Dec. 2 at 03:45 UTC (Dec. 1 at 10:45 p.m. EST) the MODIS instrument took a visible picture of the storm that showed it had become much better organized over the previous day. Powerful, high thunderstorms circled the center while bands of thunderstorms spiral in from the west, south and north.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) on Dec. 2, Hagupit had become a Category One typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale with maximum sustained winds near 70 knots (80.5 mph/129.6 kph). Hagupit was centered near 6.2 north longitude and 142.7 east latitude, about 463 nautical miles (532.8 miles/857.5 km) south of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. It was moving to the west at 17 knots (19.5 mph/31.8 kph) and generating high seas with waves up to 25 feet (7.6 meters).

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast Hagupit to continue moving west-northwest through Micronesia and to intensify to 130 knots before weakening. The forecast track takes the center of Hagupit between Palau and Yap on Dec. 3 and toward the Philippines thereafter.

Weakening is not expected to begin until Dec. 6 so Hagupit is expected to maintain typhoon status through December 7.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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Dec. 01, 2014 -NASA's Terra Satellite Catches Fast-Developing Tropical Storm Hagupit

Tropical Storm Hagupit was just a low pressure area on Nov. 30, but warm waters and good atmospheric conditions allowed the storm to develop rapidly. By Dec. 1 the low pressure area strengthened into a tropical storm when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Radiometer known as the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Hagupit in the western Pacific Ocean on Dec. 1 at 00:05 UTC (7:05 p.m. EST, Nov. 30). The picture showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation and fragmented bands of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the western quadrant.

Hagupit developed from low pressure area System 95W. On Nov. 30, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) was monitoring System 95W when it was a couple of hundred miles south of the island of Chuuk. Chuuk is an island and one of the four states of the Federated States of Micronesia, located in the western North Pacific Ocean.

By Dec. 1 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST), the low pressure area had been designated as a tropical depression and was renamed Tropical Depression 22W. Six hours later, the storm had quickly intensified into Tropical Storm Hagupit as maximum sustained winds strengthened near 40 knots (46 mph/73 kph). At that time Hagupit was centered about 140 nautical miles south-southwest of Chuuk and was moving toward the west-northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph). 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated infrared satellite imagery on Dec. 1 confirmed the low-level circulation center was consolidating and fragmented bands of thunderstorms were wrapping into the low-level center. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the storm on Dec. 1 at 02:59 UTC (Nov. 30 at 9:59 p.m. EST). The AIRS data showed strong thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures exceeding -63F/-53C around the center, which indicated the storms were high in the troposphere and capable of generating heavy rainfall.

The forecast from JTWC calls for slow intensification of the tropical storm over the next day. Thereafter, the storm is expected to intensify rapidly because of improved upper-level atmospheric conditions and warm sea surface temperatures. The JTWC is forecasting Hagupit as a typhoon as its center passes just to the north of the island of Yap on Dec. 3 while continuing to move in a west-northwesterly direction.

There are several warnings and watches now in effect for Tropical Storm Hagupit. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Satawal in Yap state. A typhoon watch is in effect in Faraulep, Woleai, Fais and Ulithi in Yap state, and a  tropical storm watch is in force in Puluwat in Chuuk state.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Hagupit
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Hagupit in the western Pacific Ocean on Dec. 1 at 00:05 UTC (7:05 p.m. EST, Nov. 30).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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This flyover 3-D view of Hagupit's precipitation structure from NASA/JAXA's GPM showed that some tall thunderstorms in the eye wall were reaching heights of almost 15 km (about 9.3 miles).
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM's rainfall analysis from Hagupit
This analysis of rainfall from Dec. 1-8, 2014 showed rainfall totals of over 450 mm (17.5 inches) in a few areas in the eastern Philippines near where Hagupit came ashore. Rainfall amounts of over 200mm (almost 8 inches) were common.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA, SSAI, Hal Pierce
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MODIS Image of Hagupit
On Dec. 8 at 05:35 UTC NASA's Aqua satellite saw the center of Tropical Storm Hagupit in the South China Sea, east of the Philippines Region IV-B of Mimaropa.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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NASA/JAXA's GPM Core Observatory show precipitation rates over Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 5, 2014 when it was over the Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA SVS/JAXA/GPM
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Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the Hagupit
NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the Hagupit on Nov. 30 at 9:59 p.m. EST that showed strong thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures exceeding -63F/-53C (purple) around the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Tropical Storm Hagupit was taken on by the MODIS instrument
This visible image of Tropical Storm Hagupit was taken on Dec. 2 by the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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Aqua captured this image of Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 3
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 3 at 04:30 UTC in the western Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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Rapidscat instrument aboard the ISS image of Hagupit
This image from the Rapidscat instrument aboard the ISS was taken when Hagupit was a tropical storm on Dec 2 at 8:50 a.m. GMT and had 25 meters/second winds (50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 kph).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL
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Super Typhoon Hagupit
On Dec. 4 at 02:10 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took this visible image of Super Typhoon Hagupit approaching the Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard's MODIS Rapid Response Team
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rainfall in Hagupit
The TRMM satellite traveled directly over Typhoon Hagupit's eye on December 3, 2014 at 0342 UTC and the heaviest rainfall appears in red.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI/JAXA, Hal Pierce
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rainfall in Hagupit
The GPM core satellite had a good view of Hagupit at 1041 UTC on Dec. 3 and showed that rain was falling at a rate of over 138 mm (~5.4 inches) per hour in the western side of Hagupit's eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI/JAXA, Hal Pierce
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wind maps of Hagupit
This RapidScat windmap of Hagupit shows the position of storm on Dec. 2 (right) and Dec. 3 (center). The storm moved a few hundred miles between these times. Winds in red were over 30 meters per second (108 kph/67 mph).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL
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TRMM image of Super Typhoon Hagupit on December 4, 2014
This TRMM satellite image of Super Typhoon Hagupit on December 4, 2014 at 1721Z showed that the heaviest rainfall was just southwest of a well-defined eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Station-RapidScat instrument captured data on Hagupit's winds.
Station-RapidScat instrument captured data on Hagupit's winds. The RapidScat image showed sustained winds of at least 30 meters per second (red) around the eye of the storm.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL
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 Suomi NPP satellite flew over Super Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 5
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Super Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 5 at 4:22 UTC (Dec. 4 at 11:22 p.m. EDT) and the VIIRS instrument showed the 12 mile-wide eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA
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NPP image of Hagupit
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Typhoon Hagupit on Dec. 7 at 5:23 UTC (12:23 a.m. EST) and the VIIRS instrument revealed strong thunderstorms around the center with an almost indistinguishable center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA
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3-D view of Hagupit's precipitation structure
A 3-D view of Hagupit's precipitation structure from NASA/JAXA's GPM showed that some tall thunderstorms in the eye wall were reaching heights of almost 15 km (about 9.3 miles).
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Hagupit
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image on Dec. 8 at 04:50 UTC of Tropical Storm Hagupit (22W) over the Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA's Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS time series for Hagupit
This time series of images were taken from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Dec. 6 (left) and NASA's Terra satellite on Dec. 7 (right) as Typhoon Hagupit approached the Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA's Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM's pass over Hagupit on Dec. 8
The TRMM satellite flew over Hagupit on Dec. 8, 2014 at 0132 UTC and was dropping light to moderate rainfall. Its center appeared to be in the northern Sibuyan Sea, located between the islands of the central and northern Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JAXA, SSAI, Hal Pierce
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ISS-Rapidscat image of Hagupit
ISS-RapidScat instrument showed sustained winds of 45 to 50 mph east of Luzon, over the Philippine Sea on Dec. 8 at 0830 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL
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Tropical Storm Hagupit seen by MODIS
NASA's Terra satellite passed over and captured a picture of Tropical Storm Hagupit curled up like a cat waiting to pounce when it landfalls in Vietnam on Dec. 11.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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TRMM rainfall analysis for Hagupit
A rainfall analysis from Dec. 1-9, 2014 showed greatest rainfall totals of over 477 mm (18.7 inches) were analyzed over the open waters of the Philippine Sea east of Manila.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Aqua image of Hagupit
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hagupit on Dec. 11 at 05:20 UTC (12:20 a.m. EST) and saw thunderstorms had become fragmented around the circulation center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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Terra image of Hagupit
NASA's Terra satellite took a visible picture of Hagupit on Dec. 11 at 10 p.m. EST winding down southeast of Vietnam's southern coast.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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Page Last Updated: December 12th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner