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Hadi (Southwestern Pacific Ocean)
March 12, 2014

[image-126]NASA Sees Remnants of Tropical Cyclone Hadi in So. Pacific

Tropical Cyclone Hadi is now a remnant low pressure area in the Southern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured a visible image of it on March 12.

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Hadi's remnants, the MODIS instrument aboard captured a visible image that showed the strongest thunderstorms associated with the low appeared south of the center of circulation. The center was located near 15.1 south and 156.1 east, about 585 nautical miles/673.2 miles/ 1,083 km west of Vanuatu.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery depicts an exposed, well-defined low-level circulation center with persistent deep convection over the southern semi-circle. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite showed that the low-level center of circulation is elongated, and there are shallow bands of thunderstorms over the southern quadrant.

The JTWC noted on March 12, "Based on the lack of convective structure, marginal environment and weak model development, the potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is downgraded to low."

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94][image-110]Mar. 11, 2014 - NASA Eyes Two Tropical Cyclones East of Australia

NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites have been providing rainfall data, cloud heights and temperature and other valuable information to forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center as they track Tropical Cyclones Hadi and Lusi in the South Pacific.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured both storms in one infrared image on March 10 at 14:47 UTC/10:47 a.m. EST. At that time, Hadi was near the east Queensland coast while Lusi was several hundred miles north of New Caledonia. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured infrared data that was used to create a false-colored image at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. The AIRS image showed that cloud top temperatures in weakening tropical cyclone Hadi were not as cold as those in strengthening tropical storm Lusi. Hadi also appeared to be almost a quarter of the size of Lusi on the infrared imagery.

NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite captured data on rainfall rates occurring in both storms on March 10. The TRMM satellite when it flew above tropical storm Hadi on March 10, 2014 at 0528 UTC. TRMM found that almost all heavy rainfall with Hadi was located in the Coral Sea well off the northeastern coast of Australia.

By 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EST on March 11, Tropical Cyclone Hadi weakened to depression status. Maximum sustained winds had dropped to 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph. Hadi was about 306 nautical miles/352.1 miles/566.7 km east of Cairns, Queensland, Australia, near 17.2 south latitude and 151.2 east longitude. Hadi was moving to the north-northwest at just 4 knots/4.6 mph/7.4 kph.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery showed that the low-level circulation center became fully exposed and away from the deep convection. When JTWC did an analysis of the upper-level atmosphere they learned that mid- to upper-level wind shear had increased, which is what pushed the convection and thunderstorms away from the center of the storm.

The JTWC noted that there is a possibility that that the remnants will re-organized over the next day as it continues moving to the north-northwest.

Meanwhile Tropical Cyclone Lusi isn't experiencing wind shear issues. At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EST on March 11, maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 kph with higher gusts. Lusi is located near 16.4 south and 168.2 east, near Vanuatu. It is centered about 362 nautical miles/416.6 miles/670.4 km north-northeast of Noumea, New Caledonia. Lusi is moving to the southeast at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph. 

A tropical cyclone watch was in force on March 11 in the Solomon Islands for Temotu, Makira, Rennell and Bellona, Malaita and southern Guadalcanal provinces. Warnings continued for Vanuatu with gale force wind warnings still in effect for Malampa, Penama and Shefa provinces.

Lusi is expected to strengthen to 75 knots/86/3 mph/138.9 kph in the next day and a half before becoming extra-tropical north of New Zealand.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Mar. 10, 2014 - Gillian and Hadi Spell Double Tropical Trouble Around Queensland

On Friday, March 7 there were two tropical lows located east and west of Queensland, Australia. Those lows organized and intensified into Tropical Cyclone Gillian and Hadi and were caught together in one amazing image from NASA's Aqua satellite. While Gillian has already made one landfall and is expected to make another, Hadi is turning tail and running from the mainland.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Queensland on March 10 at 04:00 UTC and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument known as MODIS captured Tropical Cyclones Gillian in the Gulf of Carpentaria, just west of Queensland's York Peninsula, and Hadi in the Coral Sea, east of Queensland.

On March 10 at 0300 UTC, Tropical Cyclone Gillian, formerly known as the low pressure area "System 98P" had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located about 230 nautical miles northeast of Mornington Island. Gillian is moving to the southeast at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph, but is expected to re-curve to the southwest.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that animated multi-spectral satellite imagery and radar from Weipa showed that the center made landfall in the northwestern coast of the York Peninsula.  Gillian's center is also being battered by moderate northeasterly vertical wind shear, which is preventing any further intensification, but that's expected to change as Gillian turns back toward the Gulf.  The JTWC expects Gillian to re-emerge in the Gulf of Carpentaria and head in a southwesterly direction, passing west of Mornington Island (located in the southern Gulf). JTWC forecasts Gillian to make its second and final landfall on the mainland near the Northern Territory/Queensland border on March 13.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology noted on March 10, that residents from Burketown to the Queensland / Northern Territory border, including Mornington Island and Sweers Island should consider what action they will need to take if the cyclone threat increases.  

Tropical Cyclone Hadi, formerly tropical low pressure area "System 96P" lingered off the coast of eastern Queensland near Willis Island on March 8 and 9 and is now being pushed northeast and out to sea.

On March 10 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Tropical Cyclone Hadi had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located about 176 nautical miles east-southeast of Willis Island, near 18.8 south and 151.3 east. Hadi was moving slowly to the east-southeast at 4 knots/4.6 mph/7.4 kph.

Satellite imagery showed moderate to strong vertical wind shear, between 20 and 30 knots/23.0 and 34.5 mph / 37.0 and 55.5 kph pushed the strongest thunderstorms south of the center of circulation. The JTWC expects Hadi to strengthen to 55 knots/63.2 mph/101.9 kph as it tracks to the northeast over the next several days.

For updates on watches and warnings in Australia, visit the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's website: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]Mar. 07, 2014 - NASA Satellites See Double Tropical Trouble for Queensland, Australia

There are two developing areas of tropical low pressure that lie east and west of Queensland, Australia. System 96P and System 98P, respectively. The MODIS instrument that flies aboard both NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites captured images of both tropical trouble-makers as each satellite passed overhead on March 7.

In the Coral Sea, part of the Southwestern Pacific Ocean, System 96P was just 125 nautical miles/143.8 miles/231.5 km north-northeast of Willis Island, Australia. It was centered near 14.3 south latitude and 150.6 east longitude. System 96P is moving in south-southwesterly direction toward Willis Island and the Queensland mainland. As a result, a Cyclone Watch is in effect for coastal areas from Cairns to Mackay.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over developing System 96P in the Coral Sea on March 7 at 03:25 UTC when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm. MODIS image showed the strongest thunderstorms were west and south of the center of circulation.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery revealed that the low-level circulation center is broad, and like the MODIS imagery, showed there are bands of thunderstorms wrapping into it, mostly from the southern and western quadrants.  An image from the Advanced Scatterometer instrument called ASCAT provides evidence that the low is strengthening. ASCAT can measure surface winds and indicated that the low has 25 to 30 knot/28.7 to 34.5 mph/46.3 to 55.5 kph winds wrapping into the northern semi-circle.

Willis Island reported sustained winds that match ASCAT readings, southeasterly winds sustained between 25 to 30 knots.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology expects System 96P to strengthen and approach the eastern Queensland coast near Bowen by 10 p.m. local time on March 9.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Gillian and Hadi
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Queensland on March 10 at 04:00 UTC and captured Tropical Cyclones Gillian (left) in the Gulf of Carpentaria, just west of Queensland's York Peninsula, and Hadi (right) in the Coral Sea, east of Queensland.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Hadi
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over developing System 96P in the Coral Sea on March 7 at 03:25 UTC when the MODIS instrument captured this image.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TRMM image of Hadi
The TRMM satellite when it flew above tropical storm Hadi on March 10, 2014 at 0528 UTC. TRMM found that almost all heavy rainfall with Hadi was located in the Coral Sea well off the northeastern coast of Australia.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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AIRS image of Lusi and Hadi
NASA's Aqua satellite captured both storms in one infrared image on March 10 at 14:47 UTC. Hadi was near the east Queensland coast while Lusi was several hundred miles north of New Caledonia.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Remnants of Hadi
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Hadi's remnants on March 12 and the MODIS aboard captured a visible image that showed the strongest thunderstorms associated with the low appeared south of the center of circulation.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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Page Last Updated: March 12th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner