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Gillian (Southwestern Pacific Ocean)
March 26, 2014

[image-330][image-346]NASA Catches Gillian as a Super-Cyclone Before Quickly Dissipating

Tropical Cyclone Gillian was near peak intensity when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed overhead and saw towering thunderstorms and very heavy rainfall in the storm on March 23. By March 26, Gillian had weakened to a tropical storm and was quickly dissipating.

On March 23, Tropical Cyclone Gillian was a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale when NASA-JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed overhead. TRMM flew over Gillian during its peak wind speed near 140 knots/161.1 mph/259.3 kph on March 23 at 03:04 UTC.

Data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments were used to create a rainfall analysis. TRMM PR revealed that Gillian had very intense storms in a well defined eye wall producing rain at a rate of over 100mm/3.9 inches per hour. TRMM PR showed that some of the tall storms on the southwestern side of Gillian's eye were reaching heights of about 14 km/8.7 miles.

On March 25 at 2100 UTC/5 p.m. EDT, Tropical Cyclone Gillian's maximum sustained winds were down to 40 knots, but strong vertical wind shear was pounding the storm and severely affecting the structure of the storm. At that time it was centered near 21.0 south latitude and 103.5 east longitude, about 596 nautical miles/685.9 miles/1,104 km west of Learmonth, Australia. At that time, Gillian was moving over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean in a south-southwesterly direction and was quickly dissipating.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[image-314]Mar. 25, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees Wind Shear Whipping Tropical Cyclone Gillian

A visible image from NASA's Aqua satellite provides a clear picture that wind shear is responsible for weakening the once mighty Tropical Cyclone Gillian from hurricane to tropical storm strength.

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Gillian on March 25 at 06:30 UTC/2:30 a.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument took a visible picture of the storm. That image showed that wind shear has pushed clouds and showers away from the center as the storm weakened to a tropical storm.

In the MODIS image, the center of Gillian's circulation is surrounded by some cloudiness, while the bulk of clouds and showers has been pushed to the east-southeast from wind shear from the northwest.

On March 26 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Gillian's maximum sustained winds were near 60 knots. It was centered near 19.6 south latitude and 103.9 east longitude, about 594 nautical miles/683.6 miles/1,100 km west-northwest of Learmonth, Western Australia. Gillian was moving to the south at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph.  

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC expects Gillian to weaken quickly today as it turns to the southwest in the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean. The factors contributing to its rapid weakening include strong wind shear, subsidence or sinking air aloft, and movement into cooler sea surface temperatures. 

JTWC forecasters expect Gillian to dissipate by March 26.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-298]NASA Spots Tropical Cyclone Gillian's Eye Closing 

Tropical Cyclone Gillian's eye was starting to "close" or become cloud-filled when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on March 23.

On March 23, Gillian's maximum sustained winds peaked near 140 knots/161.1 mph/259.3 kph making it a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Fortunately, Gillian pulled away from Indonesia, so all of the regional warnings were canceled on March 23.

At 06:45 UTC on March 23, NASA's Aqua satellite flew overhead and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm. In the image, Gillian's eye had already started to fill in with clouds and was surrounded by a thick band of thunderstorms wrapping around the center of circulation.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that satellite data also showed that convection along the northwest quadrant has started to contract and convection in the southeastern quadrant has continued to stretch out.  Whenever a storm elongates, it can't maintain its speed and strength, much like a tire going flat.  

By 09:00 UTC/5 a.m. EDT on March 24, Gillian's strength had waned as maximum sustained winds dropped to 120 knots/138.1 mph/222.2 kph. At that time it was centered near 17.2 south latitude and 103.5 east longitude, about 672 nautical miles/773.3 miles/1,245 km west-northwest of Learmonth, Australia. Gillian was moving toward the south at 10 knots/11.5 mph/ 18.5 kph and generating seas around 40 feet high.

JTWC noted that upper-level northwesterly wind shear has been increasing and is now strong, blowing as high as 30 knots/35.5 mph/55.5 kph.  The wind shear is weakening the tropical cyclone. In addition, there is a mid-level trough (elongated area of low pressure) approaching Gillian, and that's creating the sinking or subsidence of air, so that thunderstorms (that make up a tropical cyclone) are unable to develop. 

JTWC expects Gillian to continue weakening while tracking south for another couple of days before turning to the west.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-282]Mar. 21, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian Reborn Near Java

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the reborn tropical cyclone known as Gillian on March 21 and captured a visible image of the storm, located just south of the island of Java.

Java is highly populated island of Indonesia that includes the capital city of Jakarta. Java is divided into four provinces, East, West and Central Java and Banten. There are also two special regions of Java called Jakarta and Yogyakarta.

The MODIS instrument that flies aboard Aqua captured a visible image of Gillian on March 21 at 06:55 UTC/2:55 a.m. EDT. The image showed bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center of circulation that stretched from the north to the east and southwest. Only the northwestern quadrant appeared to have a fragmented band.  The NOAA-19 polar orbiting satellite showed that Gillian is a symmetric and compact system with improved central convection.

Gillian initially formed on March 10 in the northern Gulf of Carpentaria, part of the Southern Pacific Ocean. After a brief landfall in Queensland's Cape York Peninsula it weakened to a remnant low, moved northwest and entered the Southern Indian Ocean where it just re-formed into a tropical storm.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Tropical Cyclone Gillian's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was centered near 9.6 south and 108.2 east, just south of Java and about 834 nautical miles/959.8 miles/1,545 km north-northwest of Learmonth, Australia. Gillian was moving to the west at 16 knots/18.4 mph/ 29.6 kph. 

The Indonesian Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Jakarta has issued watches and warnings across parts of Java and Sumatra for heavy rain and rough surf. 

Gillian is expected to move west and once past Christmas Island, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect it to move southwest while intensifying to hurricane-force over open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-250][image-266]NASA Sees Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian's Remnants Persist

NASA's TRMM satellite continues to follow the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian as it moved from the Southern Pacific Ocean into the Southern Indian Ocean where it appears to be re-organizing.

The persistent remnants of tropical cyclone Gillian have moved westward over 2,700 km/1,674 miles since forming in the Gulf of Carpentaria on March 8, 2014.

Gillian's coherent remnants were located just to the southeast of the Indonesian island of Java when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew overhead on March 20, 2014 at 0415 UTC/12:15 a.m. EDT. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument revealed that intense convective storms in this area were still dropping rain at a rate of over 97 mm/3.8 inches per hour and returning radar reflectivity values of over 51dBZ. TRMM PR data were used to create a simulated 3-D view that showed the vertical structure of precipitation within the stormy area contained towering thunderstorms.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated enhanced satellite imagery on March 20 showed flaring deep convection associated with a slowly-consolidating low-level circulation center.

On March 20, the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Jakarta noted that Gillian's remnants had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph. It was centered near 9.4 south and 119.0 east, about 233 nautical miles/ 268.1 miles/431.5 km east of South Kuta, Bali, Indonesia.

TCWC issued watches and warnings for parts of the Indonesia archipelago in Bahasa.

Warm sea surface temperatures and low vertical wind shear are expected to assist in Gillian's redevelopment. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center gives Gillian a medium chance for regeneration in the next 24 hours.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 


[image-234]Mar. 19, 2014 - NASA Sees Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian Affect Indonesia

The remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Gillian moved out of the Southern Pacific Ocean and into the Indian Ocean only to trigger warnings and watches for part of Indonesia on March 19. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the stubborn storm and took a visible image of the re-organizing tropical low pressure area.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Gillian's remnants on March 19 at 05:30 UTC/1:30 a.m. EDT and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument took a visible picture of the storm. The image showed that the storm appeared to be well-defined, and more consolidated than it was the previous day.

The RSMC or Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre of Jakarta is issuing watches and warnings for parts of the Indonesia archipelago in Bahasa.

On March 18 at 1800 UTC/2 p.m. EDT, Gillian's remnants were near 9.3 south and 127.3 east, about 110 nautical miles east-southeast of Dali, Timor-Leste, Indonesia. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects the remnants will slowly develop over the next day as it moves across the Indonesian archipelago.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center gives Gillian's remnants a medium chance to regain tropical depression status in the next day.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-202][image-218]Mar. 18, 2014 - NASA Sees Some Strength Left in Remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian

NASA's TRMM satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian and spotted some towering thunderstorms and areas of heavy rainfall, indicating there's still power in the former tropical storm.

Over the past few days former tropical cyclone Gillian's remnants moved from the Gulf of Carpentaria into the Timor Sea. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM found a few strong convective thunderstorms when it passed above these remnants on March 18, 2014 at 0431 UTC. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument measured rain falling at a rate of over 86 mm/3.4 inches per hour in some intense storms.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JWTC recently assigned Gillian's remnants a medium chance to regain tropical cyclone status. Asimulated 3-D image was made at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. using TRMM PR data. The 3-D image showed that several of the tallest thunderstorms in Gillian's remnants were reaching heights of over 15.75 km/9.8 miles. Radar reflectivity values of over 50.7 dBZ were being returned to TRMM from the heavy rainfall within these storms.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued their last statement on Gillian's remnants on March 18 at 10:45 p.m. CST local time/Darwin. At that time, Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian was located 9.6 south latitude and 128.4 east longitude, about 330 km/205.1 miles east southeast of Dili and 525 km/326.2 miles east of Kupang and moving west at 24 kph/38.6 mph.

Gillian's remnants, now in the Southern Indian Ocean basin, are expected to continue moving to the west across the Timor Sea, away from the Northern Territory.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 


[image-186]Mar. 17, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian Return to Remnant Low Status

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gillian's remnants in the southern Arafura Sea today, as it passes north of Australia's "Top End."

During the week of March 10, Tropical Cyclone Gillian formed in the northern Gulf of Carpentaria and made a brief landfall on the Western Cape York Peninsula, weakening to a remnant low. After re-emerging in the Gulf, Gillian became a tropical storm again and by March 17 had again weakened to a remnant low as it exited the Gulf and moved into the Arafura Sea.

The MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Gillian's remnants moving through the Arafura Sea, north of Top End, Northern Territory at 04:05 UTC/12:05 a.m. EDT on March 17, 2014.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, an image from NOAA's NOAA-19 polar orbiting satellite on March 17 at 02:50 UTC showed that the low-level circulation center of Gillian is ill-defined and that there is weak banding of thunderstorms around it. The system is also surrounded by dry air, which is further sapping the storm's ability to generate the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone. Satellite data from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) that flies aboard the EUMETSAT METOP-A satellite showed that 10 to 15 knot/11.5 to 17.2 mph/ 18.5 to 27.7 kph winds were only seen over the western side of the storm. 

On Monday, March 17. 2014, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology noted that Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian was located at 10 pm CST (local time, Darwin) near 10.2 south and 134.2 east, about 127.4 miles/205 km north of Maningrida and 127.4 miles/205 km east northeast of Croker Island.  Gillian's remnants are moving west at 8.6 knots/9.9 mph//16 km per hour.

ABM expects Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian to continue moving to the west and is forecast to remain well to the north of the Top End coast. The north coast of the Northern Territory is not expected to receive gale-force winds.

Satellite data shows that rainfall and convection has been pushed to the western side of the center of circulation. Because of the wind shear, the ABM does not expect strengthening.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-156][image-172]Mar. 14, 2014 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Eyeing Tropical Cyclone Gillian's Rebirth

Heavy rainfall rates and powerful towering thunderstorms were spotted in what appeared to be the rebirth process of Tropical Cyclone Gillian in the Gulf of Carpentaria between Australia's Northern Territory and Queensland.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM flew above northern Australia on March 14, 2014 at 0500 UTC/1 a.m. EDT capturing rainfall data. Very strong convective storms in this area are the remnants of tropical cyclone Gillian and may signal a rebirth. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument found rain falling at the rate of over 116 mm/4.5 inches per hour in these powerful storms in the northeastern Gulf of Carpentaria.

TRMM PR data were also used to create a 3-D view of the strong convective storms in the northern Gulf of Carpentaria. Some towering convective storms were found to be very energetic. Several tall storms were shown to reach altitudes greater than 16.75 km/10.4 miles. Some heavy rain within these storms  returned reflectivity values greater than 52dBZ to the satellite. TRMM is a joint satellite mission of NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Animated multispectral satellite imagery today, March 16, showed a system that has become more symmetric. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted on March 14 at 01:40 UTC, that a composite radar loop from Weipa showed formative bands of thunderstorms had begun to spiral into a low level circulation center that has become better defined.

Computer models indicate that Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian will re-intensify to at least 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph over the next 24 to 36 hours. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 25 to 30 knots/ 28.7 to 34.5 mph/46.3 to 55.5 kph. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1001 millibars.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology  has posted a warning and a watch for Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian. A Cyclone Warning continues for coastal and island communities from Elcho Island to Numbulwar, including Alyangula and Nhulunbuy. A Cyclone Watch continues for coastal areas from Croker Island to Elcho Island.

The warning stated that Gillian is expected to approach the coast near Nhulunbuy early Sunday (March 16) morning then continue heading west near the northern coast of the Top End.

Residents between Numbulwar and Nhulunbuy, including Alyangula can expect gusty winds today, March 14, and those conditions will spread west on March 16. In addition to the winds, heavy rainfall, higher than normal tides and large waves will accompany Gillian as it moves west. 

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology expects Gillian's remnants to meander in the Gulf of Carpentaria for the next day before setting course to the northwest and moving past Nhulumbuy and Elcho Island, Northern Territory on March 16 and 17. For updated watches and warnings, visit: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-140]Mar. 13, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Gillian's Remnants Hoping for Comeback

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian weakened to a remnant low pressure area after making landfall in the Western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia then returned into the Gulf of Carpentaria. NASA's Aqua satellite flew over the tropical low as it struggled to re-intensify.

The MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian moving through Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria on March 13 at 4:25 UTC/12:45 a.m. EDT. Gillian appeared to have moved about two-thirds of the way across the Gulf from east to west toward the Northern Territory as it stayed north of Mornington Island. Satellite data indicates that thunderstorms are developing along the southern quadrant of the storm.

On March 13 at 0600 UTC/2 a.m. EDT/1:30 p.m. Darwin local time, Gillian's center was located near 14.8 south latitude and 138.0 east longitude, about 165 nautical miles/189.9 miles/305.6 km south-southeast of Gove Airport, Australia.

Animated multispectral satellite imagery on March 13 showed that the storm is compact and appears to be consolidating, indicating it is intensifying. Because of that consolidation, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center has upgraded its chances to medium for re-forming. 

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM noted that a building mid-level ridge (elongated area) of high pressure over Central Australia is expected to begin to steer Gillian toward the northwest later today, March 13. ABM expects Gillian to track near Nhulunbuy by 1230 UTC/10 p.m. Darwin local time on March 15 on its way to the northwest. Nhulunbuy is a township on the Gove Peninsula in the Northern Territory.

On March 13 at 9:16 a.m. EDT/1316 UTC/10:46 p.m. local time, ABM noted that a Cyclone Watch continued for a developing tropical low for coastal areas from Maningrida to Port Roper, including Alyangula. For updates from ABM, visit: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-124]Mar. 12, 2014 - NASA Sees Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria

Tropical Cyclone Gillian made landfall on the western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia, weakened and has now meandered back over water. On March 12, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the remnants in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria.

On March 12 at 0600 UTC/2 a.m. EST, the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian were located near 16.0 south and 141.1 east, about 115 nautical miles/ 132.3 miles/213 km east-northeast of Mornington Island in the Gulf of Carpentaria. According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC maximum sustained surface winds were estimated between 15 to 20 knots/17.2 to 23.0 mph/27.7 to 37.0 kph. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1008 millibars.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian on March 12 and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite or VIIRS instrument aboard captured a high-resolution visible image of the storm. Satellite imagery indicated that the low-level center of circulation appeared elongated.

VIIRS is a scanning radiometer that collects visible and infrared imagery and radiometric measurements. VIIRS data is used to measure cloud and aerosol properties, ocean color, sea and land surface temperature, ice motion and temperature, fires, and Earth's albedo.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery on March 13 showed that the low-level circulation center of the low pressure area was weak, and that there was isolated deep convection northeast of the center, indicative of wind shear.   

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM) noted that Gillian's remnants were moving slowly west over the southern Gulf of Carpentaria. The low is expected to continue moving west on Thursday, March 13 before moving northwest across the Gulf of Carpentaria on Friday, March 14. For ABM updated watches and warnings, visit: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Gillian has a low chance for becoming a significant tropical cyclone within the next day.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94][image-110]Mar. 11, 2014 - NASA Saw Some Power in Tropical Cyclone Gillian Before Making Landfall

NASA's TRMM satellite saw some towering thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Gillian before it made landfall over the Western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia. Gillian has been staying over land since, and is now a remnant low pressure area. 

On March 10, NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM passed over Tropical Cyclone Gillian. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument gathered data that showed some of the powerful storms within tropical storm Gillian reached heights above 16 km/9.9 miles.

Tropical Cyclone Gillian's center still remained over land on March 11 at 0300 UTC. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. Gillian was centered near 15.5 south and 141.7 east, over the Western Cape York Peninsula of Queensland and still 163 nautical miles/187.6 miles/301.9 km east-northeast of Mornington Island, Australia. It was moving to the south at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final advisory on Gillian at 0300 UTC.

By 1200 UTC/8 a.m. EST on March 11, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that Gillian had become a remnant low pressure area. An area of convection persisted near 15.6 south and 141.1 east, about 100 nautical miles/115.1 miles/185.2 km east-northeast of Mornington Island.

The JTWC noted that animated infrared imagery showed that the convection over the weak low-level circulation was poorly organized. Radar imagery showed that bands of thunderstorms were fragmented over the northwestern quadrant of the low pressure area.

Surface observations today (March 11) from Mornington Island and Kowanyama showed light winds (less than 10 knots/11.5 mph/18.5 kph) and sea level air pressure values near 1009 millibars.  Maximum sustained surface winds were estimated at 15 to 20 knots/17.2 to 23.0 mph/27.7 to 37.0 kph. JTWC noted that the potential for the re-development into a tropical depression or tropical storm is low over the next day.  

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology does not have any current warnings in place for Gillian's remnants, but cautioned, "People from Burketown to the QLD/NT (Queensland/Northern Territory) border, including Mornington Island and Sweers Island should consider what action they will need to take if the cyclone threat increases."

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SSAI


[image-51]Mar. 10, 2014 - Gillian and Hadi Spell Double Tropical Trouble Around Queensland

On Friday, March 7 there were two tropical lows located east and west of Queensland, Australia. Those lows organized and intensified into Tropical Cyclone Gillian and Hadi and were caught together in one amazing image from NASA's Aqua satellite. While Gillian has already made one landfall and is expected to make another, Hadi is turning tail and running from the mainland.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Queensland on March 10 at 04:00 UTC and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument known as MODIS captured Tropical Cyclones Gillian in the Gulf of Carpentaria, just west of Queensland's York Peninsula, and Hadi in the Coral Sea, east of Queensland.

On March 10 at 0300 UTC, Tropical Cyclone Gillian, formerly known as the low pressure area "System 98P" had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located about 230 nautical miles northeast of Mornington Island. Gillian is moving to the southeast at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph, but is expected to re-curve to the southwest.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that animated multi-spectral satellite imagery and radar from Weipa showed that the center made landfall in the northwestern coast of the York Peninsula.  Gillian's center is also being battered by moderate northeasterly vertical wind shear, which is preventing any further intensification, but that's expected to change as Gillian turns back toward the Gulf.  The JTWC expects Gillian to re-emerge in the Gulf of Carpentaria and head in a southwesterly direction, passing west of Mornington Island (located in the southern Gulf). JTWC forecasts Gillian to make its second and final landfall on the mainland near the Northern Territory/Queensland border on March 13.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology noted on March 10, that residents from Burketown to the Queensland / Northern Territory border, including Mornington Island and Sweers Island should consider what action they will need to take if the cyclone threat increases.  

Tropical Cyclone Hadi, formerly tropical low pressure area "System 96P" lingered off the coast of eastern Queensland near Willis Island on March 8 and 9 and is now being pushed northeast and out to sea.

On March 10 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Tropical Cyclone Hadi had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located about 176 nautical miles east-southeast of Willis Island, near 18.8 south and 151.3 east. Hadi was moving slowly to the east-southeast at 4 knots/4.6 mph/7.4 kph.

Satellite imagery showed moderate to strong vertical wind shear, between 20 and 30 knots/23.0 and 34.5 mph / 37.0 and 55.5 kph pushed the strongest thunderstorms south of the center of circulation. The JTWC expects Hadi to strengthen to 55 knots/63.2 mph/101.9 kph as it tracks to the northeast over the next several days.

For updates on watches and warnings in Australia, visit the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's website: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]Mar. 07, 2014 - NASA Satellites See Double Tropical Trouble for Queensland, Australia; Second System Poised to Affect Queensland

To the west of Queensland in the northern Gulf of Carpentaria lies System 98P. That tropical low pressure area was centered near 9.8 south latitude and 138.4 east longitude about 175 nautical miles/201.4 miles/324.1 km north-northeast of Gove Airport, Australia.

Another MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided an infrared image of developing System 98P on March 7 at 15:55 UTC. The MODIS image showed that 98P had some strong convection and strong thunderstorms developing west of the center.  

As System 98P continues to approach Queensland, a Cyclone Watch was declared for coastal areas from Kowanyama to Cape Grenville, including the Torres Trait Islands. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology expects this low to intensify before making landfall near Weipa at 10 p.m. local time on March 9.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC identified an area of persistent deep convection over the western semi-circle and curved bands of thunderstorms in the western quadrant of the storm. ASCAT imagery showed that the storm has an elongated circulation with primarily 20 to 25 knot/23.0 to 28.7 mph /37.0 to 46.3 kph winds. JTWC gives System 98P a medium chance for development in the next day.

For updates on the progression of these storms and forecasts for Queensland, visit the Australian Bureau of Meteorology website: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Gillian and Hadi
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Queensland on March 10 at 04:00 UTC and captured Tropical Cyclones Gillian (left) in the Gulf of Carpentaria, just west of Queensland's York Peninsula, and Hadi (right) in the Coral Sea, east of Queensland.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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System 98P which became Gillian
This infrared image of developing System 98P was taken on March 7 at 15:55 UTC from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra Satellite. 98P showed some strong convection (yellow areas).
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TRMM image of Gillian
On March 10, NASA's TRMM satellite showed that some of the powerful storms within Tropical Cyclone Gillian reached heights above 16 km/~9.9 miles.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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The TRMM Satellite's Precipitation Radar data was used to create this 3-D flyby over Tropical Cyclone Gillian on March 10. Some powerful storms within Gillian reached heights above 16 km/~9.9 miles.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Suomi NPP Image of Gillian
On March 12, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Gillian in the Gulf of Carpentaria.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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Ex-tropical cyclone Gillian
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Gillian moving through Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria on March 13 at 4:25 UTC/12:45 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TRMM image of Gillian
On March 14, 2014 at 1 a.m. EDT the TRMM satellite found rain falling at the rate of over 116 mm/4.5 inches per hour (red), and some storms were higher than 16.75 km/10.4 miles.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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On March 14, 2014 at 1 a.m. EDT this simulated 3-D flyby of the TRMM satellite showed rain falling at the rate of over 116 mm/4.5 inches per hour (red), and some storms were higher than 16.75 km/10.4 miles.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Gillian
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Gilian's remnants moving through the Arafura Sea, north of Top End, Northern Territory on March 17, 2014.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TRMM image of Gillian
TRMM passed above Gillian's remnants on March 18, 2014 at 0431 UTC and measured rain falling at a rate of over 86 mm/3.4 inches per hour in some intense storms.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA,Hal Pierce
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TRMM 3-D image of Gillian
TRMM passed above Gillian's remnants on March 18, 2014 at 0431 UTC and this 3-D simulation of TRMM data showed several of the tallest thunderstorms in GILLIAN's remnants were reaching heights of over 15.75 km/9.8 miles.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA,Hal Pierce
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Remnants of Gillian
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Gillian's remnants on March 19 at 05:30 UTC/1:30 a.m. EDT over southern Indonesia.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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TRMM 3-D image of Gillian
TRMM passed above Gillian's remnants on March 20, 2014 and this 3-D simulation of TRMM data showed several tall thunderstorms in Gillian's remnants.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM image of Gillian's remnants
On March 20, NASA's TRMM satellite saw that some thunderstorms within Gillian's remnants were dropping rain at a rate of over 97 mm/3.8 inches per hour.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Aqua image of Gillian's rebirth
NASA's Aqua satellite captured Tropical Cyclone Gillian's rebirth near Java on March 21 at 06:55 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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MODIS image of Gillian
This visible image of Tropical Cyclone Gillian was captured at 06:45 UTC on March 23 by NASA's Aqua satellite.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team
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Gillian remnants
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Gillian on March 25 at 06:30 UTC/2:30 a.m. EDT, now a tropical storm in the Southern Indian Ocean. Wind shear has pushed clouds and showers away from the center.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TRMM image of Gillian
On March 23 when the TRMM satellite passed over Gillian, it was at hurricane-force. TRMM revealed intense storms in a well-defined eye wall producing rain at a rate of over 100mm/3.9 inches per hour.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
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On March 23 when the TRMM satellite passed over Gillian, it was at hurricane-force. TRMM revealed intense storms in a well-defined eye wall producing rain at a rate of over 100mm/3.9 inches per hour. Some of the tall storms on the southwestern side were as high as 14km/8.7 miles.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: March 26th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner