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Genevieve (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
August 12, 2014

[image-256]NASA Sees the End of Tropical Depression Genevieve

Cloud tops were warming and precipitation was waning in Tropical Depression Genevieve when NASA's Aqua satellite flew overhead. Genevieve moved through all three Pacific Ocean regions (eastern, central and western) in its two week lifetime and met its end today.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression Genevieve on Aug. 11 at 01:29 UTC and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) captured infrared data on the storm. AIRS data showed a small area of the strongest thunderstorms were occurring over the northern quadrant, where temperatures approached -63F/-52C. That area was where where the heaviest rain was located.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final bulletin on Tropical depression Genevieve on Monday at 2100 UTC (4 p.m. EDT). At that time, Genevieve was located near 34.9 north and 167.6 east, that's about 940 nautical miles north of Wake Island. It was moving to the northwest at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph) and maximum sustained winds had dropped to 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph).

Genevieve was born in the Eastern Pacific, moved through the Central Pacific and into the Western Pacific where it finally became a typhoon, actually a super-typhoon. Genevieve made that Pacific Ocean trek over a period of two weeks and its journey has ended in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as the storm dissipated on August 12.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 11, 2014 - Genevieve Downgraded to a Tropical Storm [image-127]

Once Super Typhoon Genevieve has now been downgraded to a tropical storm.  The storm is located approximately 819 nautical miles west-northwest of Midway Island.  It is currently tracking northwestward at 8 knots per hour over the past six hours.  Maximum significant wave height is 32 feet.  Maximum sustained winds 70 knots gusting to 85 knots, with winds of 34 knots or higher occur within 80 to 105 miles of the cente,r and winds of 64 knots or higher occur within 15 miles of the center.  No landmasses are currently threatened by this storm. 

Genevieve is moving northwest and has continued to weaken. Unfavorable environmental factors has caused a rapid weakening over the past 12 hours. The storm will dissipate within 2-3 days, far southeast of the Aleutian islands.

Text credit:  Lynn Jenner
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-224]NASA Sees Genevieve Cross International Date Line as a Super-Typhoon

Tropical Storm Genevieve had ups and downs in the Eastern Pacific and Central Pacific over the last week but once the storm crossed the International Dateline in the Pacific, it rapidly intensified into a Super Typhoon. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured of the storm.

When Suomi NPP flew over Genevieve on August 7 at 01:48 UTC the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured an infrared image of the storm.  VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. VIIRS flies aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, which is managed by both NASA and NOAA.

The VIIRS image showed a symmetrical storm with a clear eye, about 15 nautical miles (17.2 miles/27.7 km) wide, surrounded by powerful thunderstorms.

On August 7 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) Super-Typhoon Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 140 knots (161.1 mph/259.3 kph). Genevieve is a Category 5 typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Genevieve was located near latitude 15.6 north and longitude 178.1 west, approximately 692 nautical miles (796 miles/1,282 km) west of Johnston Island. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted "Genevieve has rapidly intensified over the past 24 hours." The storm's maximum sustained winds have increased by 75 knots (126.6 mph/ 138.9 kph), pushing the storm from 65 knots (74.3 mph/120.4 kph) to 140 knots (161.1 mph/259.3 kph).

When NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Genevieve, data showed that there was a band of thunderstorms over the southern quadrant of the storm some 60 nautical miles (69 miles/111 km) thick.

The JTWC forecast calls for Genevieve to intensify with a peak of 145 knots (166.9 mph/268.5 kph) later on August 7. The forecast calls for Genevieve to maintain super typhoon strength over the next day and a half as it turns from a west-northwesterly track to a more northerly track over open ocean.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro / Max Gleber
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-208]NASA Satellite Paints a Triple Hurricane Pacific Panorama

In three passes over the Central and Eastern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Terra satellite took pictures of the three current tropical cyclones, painting a Pacific Tropical Panorama. Terra observed Hurricane Genevieve, Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio in order from west to east. Iselle has now triggered a tropical storm watch in Hawaii.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument is a key instrument aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. Between the two satellites, MODIS instruments view the entire surface of the Earth every one to two days. When NASA's Terra passed over the Central and Eastern Pacific in three swaths (or orbits), it captured images of each storm.

On Aug. 5, at 22:05 UTC (6:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve and Hurricane Iselle in the Central Pacific Ocean, and Hurricane Julio in the  Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Genevieve Revived and Strengthens into a Hurricane

Satellite data shows that the structure of Genevieve has improved rapidly into a hurricane. At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), the center of Tropical Storm Genevieve was located near latitude 12.8 north and longitude 176.8 west. That puts the center of Genevieve about 1,065 miles (1,710 km) south of Midway Island and about 555 miles (895 km) west-southwest of Johnston Island. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that Genevieve is moving toward the west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through Thursday. Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph (120 kph) and Genevieve is expected to become a typhoon in the west Pacific in the next day or two.

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

[image-111]Hurricane Iselle Triggers Watches in Hawaii

NOAA's CPHC issued a Tropical Storm Watch on August 6 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) for Hawaii and Maui Counties in Hawaii. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area within 48 hours.

At 8 a.m. EDT on August 6, Hurricane Iselle was centered near latitude 16.9 north and longitude 144.1 west, about 745 miles (1,200 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. NHC forecasters noted that maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph (145 kph) and gradual weakening is forecast during the next day or two. Iselle is moving toward the west near 13 mph (20 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction for the next day. The estimated minimum central pressure is 989 millibars.

CPHC expects the outer winds of Iselle may reach the easternmost Hawaiian Islands early Thursday afternoon. Heavy rains may bring flash floods and mudslides as Iselle approaches. CPHC noted that large and dangerous swells from Iselle are expected to reach the main Hawaiian Islands today, while winds of tropical storm strength are possible on the Big Island Thursday, August 7.

Julio Now a Hurricane

At 5 a.m. EDT on August 6, Tropical Storm Julio strengthened into the fifth hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season. By 11 a.m. EDT it was centered near latitude 15.2 north and longitude 130.5 west, about 1,650 miles (2,655 km) east of Hilo, Hawaii. NHC forecasters noted that maximum sustained winds were near 75 mph (120 kph) and some strengthening is forecast during the next day or two. Julio is moving toward the west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction for the next two days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 989 millibars.

Infrared data from instruments such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a small burst of strong thunderstorms developed with cloud tops of -75C to -80C over Julio's the low-level center of circulation during the morning (of August 6). The created a central dense overcast in the center. In addition, passive microwave satellite imagery has been indicating a closed low-to mid-level eye feature, which indicates that the storm has strengthened.

A Very Slowly Developing System Behind Julio

Trailing to the southeast of Julio is another developing tropical low pressure area called System 98E.  System 98E is actually a trough (elongated area) of low pressure located several hundred miles south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. The low is producing disorganized shower and thunderstorms. System 98E is expected to move to the west then west-northwest over the next couple of days and the National Hurricane Center gives it a very low (10 percent) chance of developing into a tropical depression over that time.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-176]Aug. 05, 2014 - NASA Sees Bursts of Thunderstorms in Tropical Depression Genevieve's Center

The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at what's happening under Tropical Depression Genevieve's clouds using infrared light, and it appears that thunderstorms are bubbling up again.

A false-colored infrared image created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena California used data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The AIRS data showed powerful thunderstorms re-developed around Genevieve's center on August 5 at 8:35 a.m. EDT. That's an indication that there's some punch left in the storm, and that punch could help it strengthen, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC).

In the August 5 discussion about Genevieve, the CPHC noted "Genevieve has continued to present a bursting pattern during the overnight hours...with the low level circulation center estimated to be under the southeastern portion of an area of very cold cloud tops."

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) today, Tuesday, August 5, Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph). The NOAA Central Pacific Hurricane Center notes that gradual strengthening is forecast today through Wednesday, and Genevieve may become a tropical storm later today.

The center of tropical depression Genevieve was located near latitude 11.1 north, longitude 171.1 west. That's about 1,120 miles (1,805 km) southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii and 400 miles (645 km) south-southwest of Johnston Island.  The depression is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph) and this motion is expected to continue today through Wednesday. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars.

NOAA's CPHC calls for slow intensification over the next couple of days as the storm continues to track in a westerly direction. Genevieve is expected to cross the International Date Line in a couple of days and when it does the forecast management of the storm would covered by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-144]Aug. 04, 2014 - Satellite View of a Hyperactive Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean

NASA and NOAA satellites have been supplying forecasters with data developing tropical cyclones in the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean and over the last several days. There have been as many as five tropical systems at the same time. On Monday, August 4, there were three tropical systems stretching from west to east: Tropical Depression Genevieve in the Central Pacific, Hurricane Iselle and Tropical Storm Julio in the Eastern Pacific.

Tropical Depression Genevieve May Strengthen

On August 4, Tropical Depression Genevieve was located about 930 miles (1,495 km) southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii. Maximum sustained winds were still near 35 mph (55 kph). Genevieve was moving westward at about 16 mph (26 kph). NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center forecasts gradual strengthening late on August 4 and 5, so Genevieve could once again reach tropical storm status.

To the east of Genevieve lies low pressure area known as System 93C. It is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. System 93C is located about 500 miles south of Hilo, Hawaii. This low pressure area is moving to the west at 15 mph and currently has a near zero percent chance of becoming a tropical depression over the next couple of days.

[image-95]Hawaii on Guard for Hurricane Iselle

Behind System 93C to the east, lies Hurricane Iselle, the current powerhouse of the Eastern Pacific.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a clear visible image of Hurricane Iselle in the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 3 at 6:05 p.m. EDT. The image revealed Iselle's somewhat cloud-covered eye with bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the eastern quadrant. The image was created by The MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

On August 4 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Hurricane Iselle's maximum sustained winds had increased to near 140 mph (220 kph) Iselle is a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. The eye of Hurricane Iselle was located near latitude 16.2 north and longitude 136.5 west.  Iselle was moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph). The National Hurricane Center noted that gradual weakening is forecast during the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 947 millibars.

The current forecast track from the National Hurricane Center takes a weaker Iselle through the entire chain of Hawaiian Islands from August 7 through August 9.

Newborn Tropical Storm Julio Chasing Iselle

Tropical Storm Julio was born around 11 p.m. EDT on Sunday, August 3, about 795 miles (1,280 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

On August 4 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Julio's maximum sustained winds were near 45 mph (75 kph). The center of Tropical Storm Julio was near latitude 13.5 north and longitude 119.4 west. Julio is moving toward the west near 13 mph (20 kph) and is expected to continue in a west to west-northwestward direction over the next couple of days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1004 millibars.

Strong northeasterly vertical wind shear is pushing the strongest thunderstorms in Julio to the western side of the storm. The National Hurricane Center noted that the wind shear is expected to continue to August 5 or 6, which will limit any intensification. NHC expects Julio to become a hurricane later this week.

Satellites from NASA and NOAA continue to provide visible, infrared, microwave data to forecasters. Beginning in August, NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission takes to the Atlantic using two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft to study the storms. For more information about NASA's HS3 mission, visit: www.nasa.gov/HS3.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-79]A Train of Five Tropical Cyclones in the Central and Eastern Pacific

A train of developing tropical low pressure areas stretch from the Eastern Pacific Ocean into the Central Pacific and they were captured in an image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on August 1. The train of five tropical lows include the remnants of Tropical Storm Genevieve and newly developed Tropical Storm Iselle.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the Pacific Ocean on August 1 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) that showed post-tropical cyclone Genevieve's remnants between three other systems. The GOES-West image shows the train of storms with a well-developed Iselle near the end of the train.

NOAA manages the GOES-West and GOES-East satellites. Data from the satellites are used to create images and animations from NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

System 91C

The western-most tropical low pressure area lies to the west of Genevieve's remnants. That low is designated as System 91C. At 0600 UTC (2 a.m. EDT), the center of System 91C was located near 12.0 north latitude and 167.3 west longitude, about 850 miles southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii. 91C has a low chance of developing into a tropical depression over the next couple of days.

East of System 91C lie Genevieve's remnants. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) issued the final warning on Post-tropical cyclone Genevieve on July 31 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). At that time it was centered near 13.0 north latitude and 151.1 west longitude, about 1,255 miles east of Johnston Island. It was moving west.

Genevieve's Remnants

At 8 a.m. EDT on August 1, Genevieve's remnant low center was located about 500 miles south-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. CPHC noted the atmospheric conditions are only marginally favorable for its redevelopment over the next few days as it moves westward near 10 mph.

System 96E

Continuing east, System 96E is tracking behind Genevieve's remnants. System 96E is another developing low pressure area with a minimal chance for becoming a tropical depression. The CPHC gives System 96E a 10 percent chance of development over the next two days. It is located in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, about 1,275 miles east-southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii. Satellite imagery shows the low is producing minimal shower activity. CPHC noted that upper-level winds are currently not conducive for development, but they could become a little more favorable in a few days while the
low moves westward at around 10 mph. 

Tropical Storm Iselle

Behind System 96E is the only developed tropical cyclone, Tropical Storm Iselle. Iselle is located east-northeast of System 96E. Tropical storm Iselle was born on July 31 at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT). On August 1, Iselle's maximum sustained winds were already up to 60 mph (95 kph).  At 5 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. PDT/0900 UTC).the center of Tropical Storm Iselle was located near latitude 13.5 north and longitude 124.6 west. Iselle is centered about 1,160 miles (1,870 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Fifth Area of Low Pressure

The fifth tropical low pressure area is east-southeast of Iselle. That area is a tropical wave that is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. That wave is located several hundred miles south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. The National Hurricane Center noted that environmental conditions are conducive for gradual development of this system during the next several days while it moves westward at 10 mph. NHC gives this low a 30 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression over the next two days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-63]July 31, 2014 - NASA Sees Genevieve Squeezed Between 3 Tropical Systems  

The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans on July 31.

NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland has been kept busy, providing visible and infrared satellite imagery of the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans. The project uses data from NOAA's GOES-West and GOES-East satellites to create images and animations. All four systems were captured in a combination infrared and visible image from July 31 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).

At 5 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT) the center of tropical depression Genevieve was located near latitude 13.1 north, longitude 150.5 west. That's about 550 miles (880 km) southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. The depression is moving toward the west near 6 mph, 9 km/h. This general motion is forecast to continue through tonight, with a slight increase in forward speed expected on Friday.

Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph) and little change in intensity is forecast through Friday night, August 1, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1009 millibars. There are no watches or warnings in effect for Hawaii.

System 91C West of Genevieve

To the west of Genevieve lies a disorganized and elongated area of showers and isolated thunderstorms. System 91C is located about 850 miles southwest of Oahu. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that the surrounding environment may permit this system to develop slightly during the next couple of days as it drifts slowly to the west. It was centered near 11.9 north latitude and 164.8 west longitude today and has a 20 percent chance of development over the next two days.

A Low Pressure Area to the East of Genevieve

To the east of Genevieve is an undesignated area of low pressure. That low was located about 1,550 miles east-southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii and CPHC noted that it was producing disorganized cloudiness and showers. Upper-level winds are only marginally favorable, and any development of this system should be slow to occur while it moves westward at about 10 mph during the next few days. This low has a 10 percent chance of development in the next couple of days.

System 95E Ramping Up in Eastern Pacific

Further east, in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, lies a third developing tropical low pressure area designated as System 95E. System 95E was located at 11.4 north latitude and 122.0 west longitude. That puts System 95E about 1,100 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) is in charge of monitoring this low pressure area and noted "Environmental conditions appear conducive for further development, and a tropical depression is forecast to form during the next day or two while the system moves west-northwestward at about 10 mph." The NHC gives System 95E a high chance of becoming the Eastern Pacific's next tropical depression over the next couple of days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-80][image-96]July 30, 2014 - NASA Sees Zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve Reborn

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a Zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on July 30.

Tropical Storm Genevieve weakened to a tropical depression on Sunday, July 27 and the National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the system as it was entering the Central Pacific. Now, after three days of living as a remnant low pressure area, Genevieve reorganized and was classified as a tropical depression again.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates in the newly reborn Tropical Depression Genevieve on July 30 at 0523 UTC (1:23 a.m. EDT).  A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave and Precipitation Radar instruments shows rain falling at a rate of over 28.5 mm/hr (about 1.1 inches) near Genevieve's center. TRMM is a satellite managed by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Genevieve on July 30 at 11:29 UTC (7:29 a.m. EDT), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument gathered infrared data on the storm's cloud tops. AIRS data showed thunderstorms reaching toward the top of the troposphere had redeveloped around the low pressure area's center of circulation. Cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F/52C and had the potential to generate heavy rainfall. 

At 5 a.m. HST (11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC) the center of Tropical Depression Genevieve was located near latitude 12.9 north, longitude 149.6 west. That puts Genevieve's center about 585 miles (940 km) southeast of South Point, Hawaii and 795 miles (1,285 km) southeast of Honolulu. Genevieve is moving westward at about 10 mph. The depression is moving toward the west near 7 mph (11 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through the next two days. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1009 millibars.

According to NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC), Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph) and some strengthening is forecast during the next two days, with Genevieve likely becoming a tropical storm within the next day. There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

To the west of Genevieve, there are two other developing tropical low pressure areas, but they have low chances for development. The first is a disorganized area of showers and thunderstorms about 810 miles south-southwest of Oahu. The CPHC expects this low pressure area to drift slowly to the west-northwest and forecasters there gave it a 20 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression over the next two days.

The other area is one of disorganized convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms), clouds and showers was centered about 1,600 miles southwest of Oahu. The CPHC noted that there is little, if any, indication that any organization is possible with this system during the next couple of days. So, even if those two low pressure areas remain "dead" to development, Genevieve the zombie storm is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm in a day or two.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]July 28, 2014 - Satellite Sees Genevieve's Remnants Chased by Two More Systems

Tropical Storm Genevieve may be a remnant low pressure area but there's still a chance it could make a comeback. Meanwhile, GOES-West satellite imagery showed there are two developing low pressure areas "chasing" Genevieve to the east. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center has suddenly become very busy tracking these three areas.

NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland provided an infrared image of the Central and Eastern Pacific on July 28 that showed Genevieve southeast of Hawaii, and two other low pressure areas behind it now getting organized.

Tropical Storm Genevieve weakened to a tropical depression on Sunday, July 27 and the National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the system as it was entering the Central Pacific. At 5 a.m. EDT the depression was located near 12.4 north latitude and 140.1 west longitude, about 1,130 miles (1,820 km) east-southeast of South Point, Hawaii. It was moving to the west near 9 mph and had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kph).

By Monday, July 28 at 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST) Genevieve became a remnant low pressure area. The remnant low was located about 780 miles southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. The Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that this may not be the last of Genevieve, however, as "environmental conditions may be somewhat conducive for development of this system as it continues to move westward at about 10 mph during the next couple of days." CPHC gives Genevieve's remnants a 30 percent chance of making a comeback in the next couple of days.

In addition to the remnant low, there's a developing area of low pressure located east of Genevieve's remnants. An elongated area of showers and thunderstorms is located about 860 miles south of Honolulu, Hawaii. The low pressure area is moving to the west at 10 mph and also has a 30 percent chance of development over the next two days.

Even farther east is yet another area of low pressure. That one is located about 1,400 miles east of the Big Island of Hawaii and it is producing limited shower activity. This low is not in a favorable area for development so CPHC gave it a 10 percent chance for becoming a tropical depression in the next two days. This low is still in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and is expected to cross into the Central Pacific in two more days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36]JULY@ 7, 2014 - Tropical Storm Genevieve Forms in Eastern Pacific

The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named "Genevieve." NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm being trailed by two other areas of developing low pressure to its east.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Tropical Storm Genevieve was born on July 25 at 5 a.m. EDT. At that time, Genevieve had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 kph). It was located near 12.2 north latitude and 134.4 west longitude, about 1,490 miles (2,400 km) east-southeast of South Point, Hawaii.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared picture of Genevieve on July 25 at 8 a.m. EDT. The bulk of the storm's clouds appeared to be pushed east of the center, indicating that westerly wind shear was affecting the storm. The GOES image also showed that Genevieve was being "followed" by two other developing areas of low pressure to the east of the storm.

By 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), Genevieve's winds increased to 45 mph (75 kph). The center of Tropical Storm Genevieve was located near latitude 12.3 north and longitude 135.5 west, moving 70 miles closer to South Point, Hawaii but still over 1,400 miles away. Genevieve was moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph) and NHC expects her to continue moving in a westerly direction over the next day or two. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1004 millibars.

NHC Forecaster Avila indicated that Genevieve's low-level center continues to be located to the west of the convection. The NHC doesn't expect Genevieve to strengthen because upper-level westerly winds are expected to move closer to the tropical storm and increase wind shear. Increased wind shear weakens tropical cyclones.

Trailing behind Genevieve to the storm's east are two other developing low pressure areas. Area #1 is located a little more than a thousand miles southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California, Mexico peninsula and is producing disorganized shower activity. The National Hurricane Center noted that there is some potential for development during the next day or two before the environment becomes unfavorable. Right now the low has a medium chance for development over the next two days as it moves to the west or west-northwest

East-southeast of Area #1 is the second developing low pressure area and south of Mexico's southern coast. That low, however is large and disorganized. The showers and thunderstorms in that area are associated with a tropical wave. Area #2 has a low chance for development over the next two days, according to NHC, but its chances are expected to improve five days out.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Genevieve and two other low systems off the coast of Mexico
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this infrared picture on July 25 at 8 a.m. EDT of Tropical Storm Genevieve (left) followed to the east by two other developing areas of low pressure.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Four tropical depressions in a row seen by GOES-West
Four tropical low pressure systems, including Tropical Depression Genevieve were captured in this GOES-West satellite combination infrared and visible image from July 31 at 11 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Genevieve and four other lows
This NOAA GOES-West satellite image from August 1 shows a train of 5 developing tropical systems in the Eastern and Central Pacific (l to r): System 91C, Genevieve, System 96E, Iselle, and a tropical wave.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Image of all tropical storms in the Eastern Pacific
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image of a very active Eastern and Central Pacific, hosting three tropical cyclones (from left to right) Genevieve, Iselle and Julio.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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On Aug. 5, at 22:05 UTC (6:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve (left), Hurricane Iselle (center), and Hurricane Julio (right) in the Central and  Eastern Pacific Oceans.
On Aug. 5, at 22:05 UTC (6:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve (left), Hurricane Iselle (center), and Hurricane Julio (right) in the Central and Eastern Pacific Oceans.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Typhoon Genevieve image from Terra
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Genevieve on August 09, 2014 at 23:15 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Genevieve's remnants
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this infrared image of Genevieve's remnants southeast of Hawaii, and two other low pressure areas behind it now getting organized.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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AIRS image of Genevieve
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of strong thunderstorms (purple) that redeveloped around Genevieve's center on July 30 at 11:29 UTC (7:29 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Genevieve
NASA's TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates in the newly reborn Tropical Depression Genevieve on July 30 at 0523 UTC. Rain was falling at a rate of over 28.5 mm/hr (about 1.1 inches) near Genevieve's center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Tropical Depression Genevieve
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image Tropical Depression Genevieve in the Central Pacific Ocean on August 4.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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AIRS image of Genevieve
This false-colored infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite shows powerful thunderstorms (purple) re-developed around Genevieve's center on August 5 at 8:35 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve in the Central Pacific Ocean.
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Genevieve in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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This visible image of Super-Typhoon Genevieve was taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on Aug. 7 at 1:34 UTC.
This visible image of Super-Typhoon Genevieve was taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on Aug. 7 at 1:34 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA
Image Token: 
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AIRS image of Genevieve
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression Genevieve on Aug. 11 at 01:29 UTC. A small area of the strongest thunderstorms (purple) were occurring over the northern quadrant.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
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Page Last Updated: August 12th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner