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Fengshen (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
September 9, 2014

[image-51]NASA Sees Tropical Storm Fengshen Looking More Like a Frontal System

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Fengshen as it continued moving away from the east coast of Japan. Satellite imagery showed that the storm resembled a frontal system more than a tropical storm because it appeared stretched from southwest to northeast

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Tropical Storm Fengshen on Sept. 9 at 1:05 UTC (Sept. 8 at 9:05 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured an image of the massive storm. The MODIS image showed that the bulk of Fenghsen's clouds were north and northeast of the center as the storm began its transition into an extra-tropical storm.

On September 9 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Fengshen's exposed and elongated center of circulation was located near 34.3 north and 148.3 east. It was about 370 nautical miles (425.8 miles/685 km) east of Yokosuka, Japan and moving to the east-northeast at 18 knots (20.7 mph/33.3 kph). Maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots 57.5 mph/92.6 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast takes Fengshen on a more east-northeasterly track over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean over the next several days as it continues to stretch out and transition from a warm core tropical storm to a cold core, extra-tropical storm. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center has issued its final bulletin on Fengshen as it spins over open waters and into hurricane history.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Sept. 08, 2014 - NASA Sees Large Tropical Storm Fengshen Skirting Eastern Japan's Coastline

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Tropical Storm Fengshen is a large storm and infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite shows that it's about as long as the big island of Japan.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Fengshen on September 7 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument known as AIRS gathered temperature data about the storm's cloud tops and surrounding sea surface temperatures. The infrared data showed strong thunderstorms surrounded the center of circulation and also appeared in large bands south and northeast of the storm's center. Another large and fragmented band on strong thunderstorms stretched to the northeast of the center of the storm and ran northeastward along Japan's east coast.

On September 8 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Fengshen had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). It was moving to the east-northeast at 23 knots (26.4 mph/42.6 kph) and away from the big island of Japan. Fengshen was centered near 31.4 north latitude and 140.6 east longitude about 264 nautical miles (303 miles/488.9 km) south of Yokosuka, Japan.  For a list of warnings in Japan, visit the Japan Meteorological Agency website: http://www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/.

Microwave satellite data on September 8, showed an eye with strong thunderstorms banding north of the center of circulation and wrapping into it. That microwave data was taken from the MetOp-B satellite. MetOp is a series of three polar orbiting meteorological satellites operated by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT).

Fengshen is expected to intensify to typhoon strength before undergoing extra-tropical transitioning as it continues to move east and away from Japan.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

AIRS image of Fengshen
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared look at Tropical Storm Fengshen east of Japan on Sept. 8.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Tropical Storm Fengshen
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Fengshen off Japan's east coast on Sept. 9 at 1:05 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Page Last Updated: September 9th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner