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Fausto (Eastern Pacific)
July 9, 2014

[image-78]NASA, NOAA Satellites Help Confirm Tropical Storm Fausto as a Remnant Low

NOAA's GOES-West and NASA-JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission satellite helped forecasters at the National Hurricane Center determine that what was once Tropical Storm Fausto is now a remnant area of low pressure in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Forecaster Beven at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that "satellite imagery, overnight scatterometer data, and a recent GPM satellite microwave overpass indicate that Fausto has degenerated to a trough of low pressure."

On July 9 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Fausto's circulation was no longer apparent on visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. The image showed the developing low pressure area known as System 98E, located to the east of Fausto, was slightly more organized today. The GOES-West image was created at NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center issued the final advisory on Fausto at the time of the GOES-West image. At that time, Fausto's remnants were located near 11.7 north latitude and 129.5 west longitude, about 1,505 miles (2,420 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph (45 kph) and weakening.   The NHC expects winds associated with the remnants of Fausto should decrease during the next couple of days.The estimated minimum central pressure was 1007 millibars.

The remnants were moving west-northwest near 17 mph (28 kph) and are expected to continue in a general west-northwestward motion for the next several days. Over that time, they will move through an area of increasing vertical wind shear and mid-level dry air which will help them dissipate.

System 98E is located to the east of Fausto's remnants. The broad low pressure area is generating showers. It is located several hundred miles southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California Peninsula and has become better organized today.  NHC noted that additional slow development is possible during the next day or so before upper-level winds become less friendly for development.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Jluly 08, 2014 - Satellite Sees Newborn Tropical Storm Fausto Being "Chased"

Tropical Storm Fausto was literally born yesterday and strengthened to a tropical storm quickly. Satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a rounded Fausto being "chased" by a developing area of low pressure to the east of the storm.

NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GOES-West captured a combination visible and infrared image of the Eastern Pacific on July 8 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT). In the image, Tropical Storm Fausto appeared as a rounded area of clouds, compared to the amorphous developing low pressure area behind it.

At 6:30 p.m. EDT on July 7, Tropical Depression Six-E formed in the Eastern Pacific about 1,145 miles (1,840 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. The depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Fausto by 11:00 p.m. EDT.

On July 8 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), Tropical Storm Fausto had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kph) and is expected to strengthen slightly. Fausto was centered near latitude 9.7 north and longitude 123.2 west, about 1,265 miles (2,040 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Fausto is moving toward the west near 14 mph (22 kph) and the National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects a westward to West-northwestward motion at a slightly faster forward speed over the next 48 hours. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars.

NHC forecaster Pasch noted in the 11 a.m. EDT discussion, "the center is not easy to locate, even on first-light visible images, but microwave imagery suggest that it is near the northern edge of the main area of deep convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone)."

NHC expects Fausto to peak on July 9 before weakening again.

To the west of Fausto is another developing area of low pressure. Shower activity associated with a broad trough of low pressure, several hundred miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. That low pressure area has become less organized over the past day. The NHC noted that development, if any should be slow to occur during the next two day as it moves west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph.  After 48 hours, upper level winds are expected to become less conducive for development.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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GOES-West image of Fausto
GOES-West captured this image on July 8 at 10 a.m. EDT. Tropical Storm Fausto as a rounded area of clouds, compared to the amorphous developing low pressure area behind it.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-51]
Fausto's remnants in the Eastern Pacific
On July 9 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Fausto's circulation was no longer apparent on visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite and System 98E was located to the east of Fausto.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
[image-78]
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Page Last Updated: July 9th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner