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Douglas (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
July 3, 2014

[image-110]Tropical Storm Douglas Weakening in the Eastern Pacific

Tropical Storm Douglas is on a weakening trend, according to the National Hurricane Center, and satellite imagery showed that the storm appeared more elongated on July 3.

NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite or GOES-West satellite captured visible data on Douglas just after sunrise on July 3 at 13:15 UTC (9:15 a.m. EDT). The data from GOES-West was made into an image at NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Forecaster Stewart at the National Hurricane Center cited that Douglas' thunderstorm activity had been gradually waning during the early morning hours on July 3 and infrared data, such as that from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed that cloud tops were warming, which indicates cloud heights were falling and the uplift of air in the storm was weakening. Despite that, microwave satellite data from NOAA's AMSU instrument and NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite indicated that Douglas had maintained a tight low-level circulation including a shallow eye-like feature.

On July 3 at 5 a.m. EDT (9:00 UTC), Douglas' maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) and the storm was weakening. The center of Douglas was located near latitude 20.4 north and longitude 116.5 west, about 455 miles (735 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Douglas is moving toward the northwest near 3 mph (6 kph).

The NHC expects Douglas to become a tropical depression late on July 3 and degenerate into a remnant low pressure area by the fourth of July.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94]July 02, 3014 - NASA Sees a Weaker Tropical Storm Douglas

NASA's Aqua satellite captured a picture of Tropical Storm Douglas as it began moving into cooler waters in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Those cooler waters, coupled with drier air are expected to bring about the storm's demise, according to the National Hurricane Center.

A visible image of Tropical Storm Douglas was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on July 1 at 21:20 UTC (5:20 p.m. EDT). The thickest band of thunderstorms appeared over the southern semi-circle of the weakening storm while bands of thunderstorms in the northwestern quadrant appeared thinner.

At 5 a.m. EDT on July 2, satellite data showed a burst of deep convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) in the northern semicircle of Tropical Storm Douglas, despite being over cooler waters. Sea surface temperatures generally need to be around 80F (26.6C) to maintain thunderstorm development in a tropical cyclone. Douglas has now entered cooler waters.

On July 2 at 5 a.m. EDT (09:00 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Douglas was located near latitude 19.6 north and longitude 116.0 west, about 455 miles (730 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Douglas is moving toward the northwest near 3 mph (6 kph) and a slow motion toward the northwest or north-northwest is expected for the next couple of days as the storm weakens. Maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph (75 kph).

Forecaster Stewart at the National Hurricane Center noted today that the water ahead Douglas will become increasingly colder while the surrounding air mass will become drier and more stable, sapping the ability for thunderstorm development. NHC expects gradual weakening over the next day and Douglas is expected to become a remnant low by 48 hours, if not sooner.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]July 01, 2014 - NASA Takes Tropical Storm Douglas' Temperature

Tropical Storm Douglas continues to move through the Eastern Pacific, passing close to the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. NASA's Aqua satellite took its cloud top temperatures using infrared data to understand where the most powerful parts of the tropical cyclone were located.

Tropical cyclones with the coldest cloud top temperatures indicate that a storm is the most healthy, most robust and powerful. That's because thunderstorms that have strong uplift are pushed to the top of the troposphere where temperatures are bitter cold. Infrared data, such as that collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite can tell those temperatures. If AIRS data shows that cloud top temperatures are near or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-53 Celsius), that indicates strong thunderstorms high up in the troposphere. According to research with AIRS data, thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures that high are likely to generate heavy rainfall.

So, when Aqua flew over Tropical Storm Douglas on June 30 temperatures of the many thunderstorms that circled Douglas' center were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-53 Celsius). The AIRS image also showed a band of thunderstorms in the northern quadrant were also that cold.

On July 1 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Douglas was near latitude 18.8 north and longitude 115.3 west, about 450 miles (720 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Douglas was moving toward the northwest near 7 mph (11 kph). The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Douglas to turn toward the west-northwest and slow down. Maximum sustained winds remain near 45 mph (75 kph) and NHC expects little change in strength. For updates, visit the NHC website at: www.nhc.noaa.gov.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]June 30, 2014 - Two Systems Make Chase in the Eastern Pacific

NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted two tropical low pressure areas chasing each other in the Eastern Pacific over the last several days. By June 30, one had become Tropical Storm Douglas while the other remained a developing low pressure area known as System 97E.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, the NASA/NOAA GOES Project created an infrared image of Tropical Storm Douglas being chased by developing System 97E (to the east-southeast of Douglas) at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT). The image was created using data from NOAA's GOES-West satellite

On June 30 at 5 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. PDT/ 900 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Douglas was located about 480 miles (775 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California near latitude 16.6 north and longitude 113.1 west. Douglas was moving toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 kph). Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 kph). The National Hurricane Center expects some strengthening during the next couple of days.

Meanwhile, System 97E has become better organized in an area of pressure located 180 miles south-southeast of Manzanillo, Mexico. The National Hurricane Center noted today, June 30 that the system still lacks a well-defined circulation center. Upper-level winds are not particularly conducive for additional development, but only a slight increase in organization could result in the formation of a tropical storm during the next day or so while the system moves west-northwestward at about 10 mph. NHC noted that the chance System 97E will become a tropical depression in the next 2 days is near 70 percent.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Tropical Storm Douglas being chased by developing System 97E
This infrared image shows Tropical Storm Douglas being chased by developing System 97E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The image was from the GOES-West satellite at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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purple blob to the right of an orange sea
This infrared AIRS instrument image from June 30 shows powerful thunderstorms around Douglas' center (purple) and a band of thunderstorms north of center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Aqua image of Douglas
This visible image of Tropical Storm Douglas was taken by the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on July 1 at 21:20 UTC (5:20 p.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
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GOES-West infrared image of Douglas
NOAA's GOES-West satellite's infrared data from July 3 at 9:15 a.m. EDT showed Douglas appeared less organized and less-round than the day before.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
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Page Last Updated: July 3rd, 2014
Page Editor: Rob Garner