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Ana (Central Pacific)
October 28, 2014

[image-113]Ana's Remnants Raining and Gusting in British Columbia, Canada

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of post-tropical cyclone Ana's remnant clouds raining on British Columbia, Canada today, Oct. 28. Wind warnings along some coastal sections of British Columbia continued today as the storm moved through the region.  

NOAA's GOES-West satellite gathered infrared data on Ana's remnant clouds and that data was made into an image by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. In the image the remnant clouds resemble a frontal system.

Environment Canada's Meteorological Service continued wind warnings for British Columbia's Central coast, East Vancouver Island, North Vancouver Island and the Sunshine Coast  The warning noted strong winds may cause damage. Strong southeast winds of 56 mph (90 kph) over exposed coastal sections will continue during the morning of Oct. 28.

At 8 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28, Victoria Int'l Airport in Victoria, British Columbia reported light rain with sustained winds near 21 mph (34 kph) and gusts to 29 mph (47 kph). Vancouver International Airport reported light rain with sustained winds near 16 mph (26 kph) from the east.

The local forecast calls for skies to clear as the remnants of Ana to move east by Wednesday, Oct. 29.

Environment Canada meteorologists will update alerts as required.  For updates, visit: http://weather.gc.ca.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-294][image-312]Oct. 27, 2014 - Satellite Movie Shows Tropical Storm Ana Headed to British Columbia, Canada

An animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite taken over the period of Oct.19 to 26 shows the movement, intensification, weakening and movement toward British Columbia, Canada. On Oct. 27, wind warnings were posted along some coastal sections of British Columbia.

During the week of Oct. 19 Ana moved west of the Hawaiian Islands and into the open waters of the Central Pacific Ocean, strengthening into a hurricane and weakening back to a tropical storm. A 20 second video of the storm's movement was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

On Oct. 26, NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center issued the final bulletin on Ana. At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), it was a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 40 knots. Ana was located near 42.2 north latitude and 147.9 west longitude, about 1,555 miles north-northeast of Honolulu, Hawaii. It was moving to the east-northeast at 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). Ana has transitioned into an extra-tropical storm, meaning that its core changed from a warm system to a cold core system, like a typical mid-latitude weather system. 

At 5:05 a.m. PDT on Monday, October 27, Environment Canada's Meteorological Service posted a Wind warning in effect for British Columbia's Central coast, Vancouver Island, Haida Gwaii, North Vancouver Island, and the Sunshine Coast.  The warning noted strong winds may cause damage are expected or occurring. In addition, there will likely be heavy rainfall associated with the system and rainfall amounts of 50 to 75 mm (~2 to 3 inches) are possible for tonight into Tuesday.

The EC noted that the remains of Tropical Storm Ana will move towards the British Columbia Coast later today (Oct. 27) and tonight. Southeast winds are forecast to increase to 90 kph (56 mph)  over exposed coastal sections by this evening. Winds will then gradually ease through Tuesday morning.

Environment Canada meteorologists will update alerts as required.  For updates, visit: http://weather.gc.ca.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-258][image-276]NASA Sees Tropical Storm Ana Still Vigorous

NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the storm as it moved over open ocean.

On Oct. 24, Ana had moved far enough away from land areas that there were no watches or warnings in effect.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over tropical storm Ana on October 22, 2014 at 1935 UTC (about 8:30 a.m. HST local time). Ana formed over ten days ago but after moving to the northwest of the Hawaiian islands the tropical storm was shown to be still vigorous. A rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) revealed an area near Ana's center of circulation where rain was falling at a rate of over 40 mm (about 1.6 inches) per hour. TRMM is managed by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Oct. 24 at 00:25 UTC (Oct. 23 at 8:25 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer captured a visible image of the storm. The MODIS image showed that there was weak north to north-northwest vertical wind shear that was pushing the clouds and showers away from the center. The MODIS image showed some deep convection and developing thunderstorms mainly along its southeastern semicircle.

On Friday, Oct. 24 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC/11 p.m. HST, Oct. 23) the center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 27.9 north and longitude 170.1 west. That's about 365 miles (585 km) northwest of French Frigate Shoals and 890 miles (1,435 km). Maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph). NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that Ana may intensify slightly on Friday, but little significant change in intensity was forecast over the weekend of Oct. 25-26.

Ana is moving toward the north-northwest near 8 mph (13 kph). Ana is expected to begin moving toward the north with a gradual increase in forward speed later tonight and Friday. A rapid acceleration of Ana toward the northeast is expected this weekend.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) predicts that Ana will continue to move over open waters and undergo extra-tropical transitioning in the next couple of days. By early next week, Oct. 28 or 29 the JTWC expects Ana to be absorbed by a strong extra-tropical low pressure area that is forecast to approach British Columbia, Canada. 

Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SSAI


[image-240]Oct. 23, 2014 - NASA's Terra Satellite Shows a More Organized Tropical Storm Ana

The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize. Ana appeared more rounded on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite as thunderstorms again circled the low-level center.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Ana on Oct. 22 at 22:10 UTC (6:10 p.m. EDT). The MODIS instrument aboard Terra captured a visible image of the storm that showed clouds and showers were no longer being blown northeast of the center from southwesterly wind shear, as they had in the last couple of days. The wind shear has weakened, which allowing for the showers and thunderstorms to redevelop around the center of the storm.

On Oct. 24, Ana was strengthening and moving northwest while crossing the northwest Hawaiian Islands east of Maro Reef.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, from French Frigate Shoals to Lisianski.

At 8 a.m. (2 a.m. HST/1200 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 26.0 north and longitude 168.6 west. Ana was moving toward the northwest near 12 mph (19 kph) and this motion is expected to become more northerly through early Friday, then northeasterly through early Saturday, Oct. 25. Maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (80 kph).

NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center expects Ana to continue strengthening through early Saturday.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-222]NASA's Terra Satellite Sees Wind Shear Affecting Tropical Storm Ana

Tropical Storm Ana was being battered by wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and saw the bulk of showers and thunderstorms pushed north and east of the center.

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Tropical Storm Ana as it was moving past Hawaii on Oct. 21 at 21:30 UTC (5:30 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument took a visible picture of the storm. The MODIS image showed that the strong southwesterly wind shear that was affecting the storm on Oct. 20 continued through Oct. 21 as the bulk of clouds and showers were north and east of the center. The center appeared as an open area with a sprinkling of fragmented clouds around it.

At 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST) on Oct. 22, NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that thunderstorms with tops to 53,000 feet were northeast of the center, with additional thunderstorms embedded within the layered clouds that extend about 250 miles to the northwest through east of the center. 

At 11 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. HST/1500 UTC) the center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 22.8 north and longitude 167.4 west. That puts Ana's center about 105 miles (165 km) southwest of French Frigate Shoals and about 515 miles (825 km) west of Lihue, Hawaii. Maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) and CPHC forecasters expect some strengthening through early Friday, Oct. 24.

Ana is moving toward the northwest near 8 mph (13 kph) and this motion is expected to gradually become northerly through early Friday. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars.

A tropical storm warning was in effect on Oct. 22 for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, from Nihoa to Lisianski.

CPHC noted that tropical storm conditions are expected over French Frigate Shoals, Necker Island and Gardner Pinnacles, and nearby waters, today and tonight, Oct. 22. Large swells produced by Ana will build across the northwest Hawaiian Islands today and tonight. Surf produced by these swells will be dangerous along the southern and southeastern facing reefs of the northwest Hawaiian Islands. In addition, rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches are possible over the northwest Hawaiian Islands near the center of Ana.

Ana is moving northwest and is expected strengthen as it moves through the western part of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument.  

Ana dropped almost a foot of rainfall on Oahu and the big island of Hawaii, with totals as much as 3 to 6 inches on the other Hawaiian Islands. CPHC rainfall totals appear below.

Hurricane Ana Rainfall Totals from NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center 

The following are total rainfall amounts reported beginning on Friday afternoon, Oct. 17 to the National Weather Service's Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Rainfall continues across portions of Kauai and Oahu. These preliminary totals were calculated using provisional reports from automated rain gages that have not been quality controlled.

LOCATION                                      AMOUNT

KAUAI

MOUNT WAIALEALE RAINGAGE      6.04

KILOHANA RG – USGS                      4.88

WAILUA DITCH – USGS                     3.83

 

OAHU

MANOA LYON ARBO                        11.05

POAMOHO RG 1 – USGS                 7.47

MOANALUA - USGS – USGS            6.89
 

MOLOKAI

PUU ALII                                              3.22

KAUNAKAKAI MAUKA                        1.08

 

KAHOOLAWE

KAHOOLAWE                                      3.25

 

MAUI

KULA FOREST                                  3.54

PUU KUKUI - USGS                         3.08

KEPUNI - USGS                                2.45

 

HAWAII

KEAUMO                                            11.67

KULANI NWR                                     8.61

KAPAPALA RCH                                 7.66

HILO AIRPORT                                  5.34

MAUNA LOA SLOPE OBS                5.32

 

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-95]NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Ana Still Affecting Hawaii

Slow-moving Tropical Storm Ana was still affecting parts of Hawaii on Oct. 20 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space. Imagery from Aqua showed that wind shear was affecting the storm. 

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii on Oct. 20 at 23:55 UTC (7:55 p.m. EDT).  The image showed that most of the clouds and showers were north and east of the center of circulation, pushed away from the center by strong southwesterly wind shear.

The MODIS image showed clouds in Ana's eastern quadrant covered the islands of Kauai and Niihau. Kauai is geologically the oldest of the main Hawaiian Islands and fourth largest of the main islands in the Hawaiian archipelago. Niʻihau or Niihau is the seventh largest of the inhabited Hawaiian Islands.

A tropical storm warning is still in effect for parts of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from Nihoa to Maro Reef.  The Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that rainfall totals of 4 to 8, locally up to 12, inches are possible over the northwestern Hawaiian Islands near the center of the storm.

At 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST/1200 UTC) Ana's maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph) and little change in strength is forecast through early Thursday. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 20.8 north and longitude 165.4 west. Ana's center was about 215 miles (345 km) south-southeast of French Frigate Shoals.  The French Frigate Shoals is the largest atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. 

Ana was moving toward the west near 9 mph (14 kph) but the storm is expected to gradually become northerly through early Thursday, Oct. 22. The estimated minimum central pressure is 999 millibars.

CPHC warnings cited large swells produced by Ana will build across the northwest Hawaiian Islands through Wednesday. Surf produced by these swells will be dangerous along the southern and southeastern facing reefs of the northwest Hawaiian Islands.

The CPHC expects Ana to curve to the northeast and start transitioning into an extra-tropical storm on Friday, Oct. 24.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-168][image-77]Oct. 20, 2014 - NASA's Terra Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii

Tropical Storm Ana made a slow track west of the Hawaiian islands over the last couple of days, and by Oct. 20 was moving westward away from the main Hawaiian islands and heading toward the northwest Hawaiian islands. NASA's Terra satellite caught Ana on a flyby on Oct. 19 that showed the storm's clouds blanketing the chain of islands.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible picture of Tropical Storm Ana blanketing the Hawaiian Islands on Oct. 19 at 21:45 UTC (5:45 p.m. EDT). At the time, the strongest thunderstorms appeared to be in the eastern and western quadrants of the storm.

On Monday, Oct. 20, a tropical storm warning was in effect for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, from Nihoa to French Frigate Shoals. A hurricane watch was in effect for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, from Nihoa to Maro Reef.

At 8 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. HST/1200 UTC) Tropical Storm Ana was just below hurricane strength with maximum sustained winds near 70 mph (110 kph). NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) expects weakening today, but intensification on Oct. 20. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 20.6 north and longitude 162.6 west. That puts the center of Ana about 225 miles (360 km) west-southwest of Lihue Hawaii and about 325 miles (525 km) southeast of French Frigate Shoals.  Ana is moving toward the west near 9 mph (15 kph) and is expected to gradually turn to the northwest. 

For updates on warnings and local conditions, please visit NOAA's CPHC website: http://www.prh.noaa.gov. 

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-132][image-150]Oct. 17, 2014 - Satellites Sees a Question Mark in Tropical Storm Ana

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Ana that showed the outer clouds were already reaching the big island by 11 a.m. EDT and the storm resembled a giant question mark.

Tropical Storm Ana was nearing hurricane strength mid-day on Oct. 17 and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) expects the storm to become a hurricane before reaching the big island of Hawaii.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite took an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Ana as it was approaching Hawaii on Oct. 17 at 11 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. HST). Ana looked like a giant question mark in the infrared image, as a large band of thunderstorms wrapped into the center from the eastern side of the storm and extended south of the storm.

Despite the storm looking like a question mark from space, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center said that there is no question the storm has been intensifying.

A Tropical Storm Watch remained in effect for Hawaii County on Oct. 17. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, in this case within 24 to 36 hours. Interests elsewhere in the main Hawaiian Islands, and in the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument Area, should monitor the progress of Ana.

The CPHC expects tropical-storm-force winds to affect the Big Island of Hawaii by tonight, Oct. 17. In addition, heavy rainfall with total rain accumulations between 6 and 8 inches, with isolated totals of 12 inches are possible. Heavy rain could potentially affect the other islands Saturday and Sunday. This rainfall could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

In addition to the winds and heavy rainfall, dangerous surf will precede and Ana. CPHC noted that large swells are expected to build over the eastern end of the main Hawaiian island chain today (Oct. 17) through Saturday. These large swells will continue to spread up the island chain through the weekend. Surf produced by these swells could potentially be damaging along exposed south and southeast shorelines beginning later today and Saturday, and persisting through the weekend in some areas. 

At 11 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. HST) maximum sustained winds were near 70 mph (110 kph) and Ana is expected to become a hurricane later in the day with gradual weakening expected Saturday and Sunday. The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 15.7 north, longitude 154.2 west. Ana was moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph)

Ana is expected to turn slightly to the northwest and slow over the weekend of Oct. 18 and 19. After a brief stint as a hurricane overnight Oct.17 and early Oct. 18 when it will be west of the Big Island, it is expected to weaken back to a tropical storm and move almost parallel to the Hawaiian Islands while remaining over water, west of the islands. By mid-week next week, around Oct. 18, the CPHC expects Ana to track through the French Frigate Shoals.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-96][image-114]Satellites Tracking Central Pacific's Tropical Storm Ana

Tropical Storm Ana continued on a path to the Hawaiian Islands as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and gathered data on the storm. NOAA's GOES-West satellite data was compiled into a movie that showed the intensification and movement of Ana. Watches are now in effect for Hawaii.

NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) has issued a Tropical Storm Watch for Hawaii County, Hawaii. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, in this case within 36 to 48 hours. Life-threatening surf and riptide conditions will start to affect the Hawaiian Islands from Thursday onwards. Heavy rainfall will reach the Big Island on Friday, causing life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

Interests elsewhere in the main Hawaiian Islands, and in the Papahanaumokuakea marine national monument area from Necker to French Frigate Shoals, should monitor the progress of Ana. Watches May be required for additional areas in the main Hawaiian Islands later today.

CPHC noted that tropical storm conditions are possible on the Big Island of Hawaii starting late Friday, Oct.17. In addition, large swells produced by Ana are possible over the eastern end of the main Hawaiian island chain starting late tonight and Friday morning. These large swells will continue to spread up the island chain through the weekend. Surf produced by these swells could potentially be damaging along exposed shorelines beginning late Friday and Saturday, and persisting through the weekend in some areas.  Heavy rainfall associated with Ana may reach the Big Island of Hawaii Friday afternoon. These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

At the NASA/NOAA GOES Project office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, infrared and visible image of Tropical Storm Ana were compiled from Oct. 13 through Oct. 16 and made into a movie that showed the intensification and movement of Ana. NOAA manages the GOES-West satellite.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Oct. 15 at 20:30 UTC (4:30 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer captured a visible image of the storm that showed extent of the rounded clouds. The storm appeared so rounded that it looked like a white sun.

At 500 a.m. HST (9 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC) on Oct. 16, Ana's maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph (95 kph) and gradual strengthening is expected and Ana is expected to become a hurricane on Friday, Oct. 17.

The center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 14.1 north, longitude 150.3 west. That's about 500 miles (805 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.  Ana is moving toward the west near 10 mph (17 kph) and is expected to turn to the northwest on Oct. 17. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars. 

Ana is forecast to move to the west-northwest and strengthen into a hurricane, approaching the big island of Hawaii by Saturday, Oct. 18 and then tracking parallel to the islands over the two days following. For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-69]Oct. 15, 2014 - NASA's Aqua Satellite Watches Tropical Storm Ana Intensifying

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over intensifying Tropical Storm Ana as it was moving through the Central Pacific Ocean and toward the Hawaiian Islands.

On Oct. 14 at 22:50 UTC (6:50 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean. The MODIS image showed a tight concentration of thunderstorms surrounding the center of Ana's circulation.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/5 a.m. HST) on Wed. Oct. 15, Tropical Storm Ana's maximum sustained winds were near 70 mph (110 kph). Ana is forecast to gradually intensify through Thursday night, and it may become a hurricane later today or tonight, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

The center of tropical storm Ana was located near latitude 14.3 north, longitude 146.5 west. That's about 680 miles (1095 km) southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. Ana is moving toward the west near 9 mph (15 kph), and this general motion is expected to continue today, with a gradual turn toward the west northwest expected tonight or early Thursday, and this motion is expected to continue through late Thursday.

Ana is expected to begin causing life-threatening surf and riptide conditions through the Hawaiian Islands beginning Thursday, Oct. 16. CPHC noted that surf produced by these swells may be potentially damaging along some shorelines starting on Friday. There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect, however, a hurricane watch may be required for portions of the main Hawaiian Islands later today or tonight (Oct. 15).

Ana is moving northwest and intensifying. The CPHC expects Ana to become a hurricane late on Oct. 15. By the weekend of Oct. 18-19, Ana is forecast to approach the main Hawaiian Islands.    

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-50]Oct. 14, 2014 - NASA's Aqua Satellite Spots Central Pacific's Tropical Storm Ana

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 after it formed in the Central Pacific Ocean.

Ana formed on Oct. 13 at 5 p.m. EDT (11 a.m. HST) as Tropical Depression 2-C, about 920 miles (1,480 km) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. By 9 p.m. EDT that day, the depression had strengthened into Tropical Depression Ana.   

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 at 11:11 UTC (7:11 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument gathered infrared data that showed some strong thunderstorms and cold cloud tops had developed around the center of circulation.

At 500 am HST, 1500 UTC, Ana's maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph) and gradual strengthening is expected through early Thursday morning. The center of Tropical Storm Ana was located near latitude 13.4 north, longitude 143.3 west. That's about 895 miles (1,440 km) east-southeast of Hilo Hawaii.  Ana is moving toward the northwest near 5 mph (7 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through early Thursday morning. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 millibars.

Currently, NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center has no watches or warnings in effect. However, Ana is forecast to move to the west-northwest and strengthen into a hurricane over the next couple of days, approaching the big island of Hawaii by Sunday, Oct. 19. For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

AIRS image of Ana
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Monday, Oct. 13 at 11:11 UTC (7:11 a.m. EDT) and captured infrared imagery showing some strong thunderstorms and cold cloud tops (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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This video shows the movement of Tropical Storm Ana near the Hawaiian Islands from Oct. 17-20.
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Ana
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii on Oct. 20 at 23:55 UTC (7:55 p.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA's Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Post-tropical cyclone Ana's remnant clouds resemble a frontal system in this image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
Post-tropical cyclone Ana's remnant clouds resemble a frontal system in this image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Ana
On Oct. 14 at 22:50 UTC (6:50 p.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Terra image of Ana
On Oct. 15 at 20:30 UTC (4:30 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean.
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NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite data from Oct.13-16 shows the intensification and movement of Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean.
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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GOES image of Ana
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana approaching Hawaii in the Central Pacific Ocean on Oct. 17 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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This video of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Oct. 14-17 shows the movement and strengthening of Tropical Storm Ana approaching Hawaii.
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS Image of Ana
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana blanketing the Hawaiian Islands on Oct. 19 at 21:45 UTC (5:45 p.m. EDT).
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NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Terra image of Ana
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana moving past Hawaii on Oct. 21 at 21:30 UTC (5:30 p.m. EDT).
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NASA's Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Terra image of Ana
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ana on Oct. 22 at 22:10 UTC (6:10 p.m. EDT) and saw that wind shear had relaxed.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Ana
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Ana in the North Pacific Ocean on Oct. 24 at 00:25 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM image of Ana
The TRMM satellite flew over tropical storm Ana on October 22, 2014 at 1935 UTC (8:35 a.m. HST) and saw rain falling at 40mm (1.6 inches) per hour (red) near the center.
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This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Oct.19 -27 shows the movement of Tropical Storm Ana as it heads toward British Columbia, Canada. TRT: 00:20
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NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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MODIS image of Ana
NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Ana in the Central Pacific Ocean on Oct. 25 at 21:00 UTC (5 p.m. EDT).
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NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Page Last Updated: October 28th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner