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Alessia (Southern Indian Ocean)
November 29, 2013

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Alessia Trying to Come Back a Second Time

[image-142]The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Alessia just won't give up. Alessia formed in the Southern Indian Ocean, made landfall in Western Australia and tracked east, weakening to a low pressure area only to regain tropical storm status on November 27 and weaken to depression on November 28.Satellite imagery shows that Alessia may try for a second comeback.

Now in the Gulf of Carpentaria which is bordered on three sides by Australia's Northern Territory and Queensland, and that is part of Southwestern Pacific Ocean basin, the remnants are getting better organized again. Ex-tropical Storm Alessia is located about 75 nautical miles west of Mornington Island, Queensland, Australia, near 16.2 South and 138.1 East.

Multispectral satellite imagery on November 28 showed that strong convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) had increased around the low-level center of circulation (which is poorly defined). The low was moving erratically along the southern coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted an upper-level analysis revealed that conditions are favorable for further development.

On November 28, maximum sustained winds were between 15 and 20 knots/17.2 and 23.0 mph/27.7 and 37.0 kph, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center notes that it now has a medium potential for re-development.

The Naval Research Laboratory created a composite satellite image that included rainfall data from NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite. TRMM data showed areas of heavy rain falling over the Northern Territory, west of Alessia's center. Japan's MTSAT satellite provided infrared data that showed the extent of the remnant low's cloud cover, which stretched over the Gulf of Carpentaria.

As satellites continue to provide data, forecasters are watching to see if Alessia could be re-born a second time.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.


Nov. 27, 2013 - ASA Sees Alessia Reclaim her Crown as a Tropical Storm [image-110] [image-126]

The former tropical storm Alessia reclaimed her title on November 27 in the Gulf of Carpentaria, as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and observed heavy rainfall occurring in bands of thunderstorms around the storm's center.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed directly above newly transformed Tropical Storm Melissa's center of circulation on November 27, 2013 at 02:25 UTC/10:25 p.m. EST on Nov. 26. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument found that rain was falling at a maximum rate of 50 mm/2.0 inches per hour west of the center, and in a large band of thunderstorms stretching from the east to the south. 

On November 27 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST Alessia's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. Alessia's center was located near 15.9 south latitude and 137.7 east longitude, about 105 nautical miles/120 miles/194.5 km west-northwest of Mornington Island, Australia. Alessia was moving to the east southeastward at 3 knots/3.4 mph/5.5 kph.

Mornington Island is located in the southern part of the Gulf of Carpentaria, and is part of the state of Queensland. The Gulf of Carpentaria is a shallow sea that is surrounded by land on three sides and the Arafura Sea to the north. The Northern Territory borders the Gulf on its west and south sides, while Queensland borders the Gulf to the east and southeast. 

On November 27, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM, posted a Cyclone Warning for coastal areas from Port Roper to Mornington Island, and a Cyclone Watch was in effect for coastal areas from Mornington Island to Burketown. The Cyclone Watch from Burketown to Karumba was cancelled. Heavy rainfall and abnormally high tides may cause flooding in low lying areas Roper-McArthur District and coastal areas in Queensland Gulf Country west of Mornington Island, according to the ABM forecast. For updated warnings, visit: http://www.bom.gov.au/qld/warnings/.

Alessia is now forecast to make another landfall, and this time the final one, just west of Mornington Island on the mainland in Australia's Northern Territory. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Alessia's landfall to occur on November 28 around 0600 UTC/1 a.m. EST. Thereafter, Alessia is expected to track to the south-southeast, further inland where it will dissipate.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Nov. 26, 2013 - NASA Sees Ex-Tropical Cyclone Alessia's Remnants Trying to Reorganize [image-94]

After making landfall near Darwin on Nov. 24, the remnants of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Alessia worked its way over to Australia's Northern Territory where it was seen from NASA's Aqua satellite. Aqua passed over the remnant low and captured infrared data on it that revealed that although the low remains disorganized, some strong thunderstorms were over the northwestern coast of the Northern Territory.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captures infrared data and can provide scientists with temperature data on tropical cyclones. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Alessia on November 26 at 0447 UTC/Nov. 25 at 11:47 p.m. EST AIRS captured temperature data on the storm's clouds. AIRS infrared data showed that the strongest thunderstorms with the coldest cloud top temperatures and the potential for the heaviest rains stretched from Daly Waters in the north central part of the territory, east to Borroloola, south to Cape Crawford.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued a Coastal Waters Wind Warning for the southwest Gulf of Carpentaria waters at 11:00 p.m. CST local time on November 26, as the low was moving through the region. The remnants are now an elongated area of low pressure, or trough.  

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning center noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery showed that the structure of the former tropical cyclone had improved as it moved over the western part of the Gulf of Carpentaria. Radar imagery from Gove, Australia indicated the banding of thunderstorms were fragmented as the low-level center was moving toward the northeastern coast of Australia's Northern Territory.

On November 26 (EST) at 10 a.m. EST, the remnant low was centered about 20 nautical miles/23 miles/37 km of 14.4 south and 136.8 east, about 60 nautical miles/69 miles/111 km south-southeast of Alyangula, Australia. The remnant low is expected to move slowly south before moving west on November 27 and 28 toward the Timor Sea.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center gives the remnants a low chance for regeneration over the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Nov. 25, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Alessia Make Landfall Near Darwin [image-78]

Tropical Cyclone made landfall near Darwin, Australia on November 24 as a weak tropical storm as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and measured its rainfall.

The final warning on the tropical storm was issued on November 24 from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST. At that time, Tropical Cyclone Alessia was located near 13.8 south latitude and 129.0 east longitude, about 136 nautical miles/156.5 miles/252 km southwest of Darwin, Australia. Alessia was moving to the east at 15 knots/17.2 mph/27.7 kph and had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph at the time.  

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Alessia on November 24 at 1325 UTC/8:25 a.m. EST and identified mostly light rain from the system with a small area of moderate rainfall, falling at a rate of 1.18 inch/30 mm per hour.

Cyclone Alessia crossed Australia's Northern Territory coast and made landfall south of Darwin during the night-time hours and quickly dissipated.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology reported that the Upper Adelaide River, just north of where Alessia made landfall, received tropical-storm-force winds and received about 54 millimeters of rain. No damages were reported.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Nov. 22, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Alessia Form, Threaten Western Australia  [image-51]

The low pressure area previously known as System 90S has continued organizing and consolidating and infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm its strengthening into Cyclone Alessia in the Southern Indian Ocean. Alessia formed off of Western Australia's Kimberley coast and the first Cyclone Warnings and Watches of the season are now in effect.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument called MODIS that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of newly-developed Tropical Cyclone Alessia on Nov. 22 at 02:20 UTC/Nov. 21 at 9:20 p.m. EST. The image showed good circulation and bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center of circulation from the east and west. Even multispectral satellite imagery showed that the bands of thunderstorms had become more tightly wrapped around the storm's center.

On November 22 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone Alessia was located about 237 nautical miles/ 272.7 miles/438.9 km northwest of Broome, Australia, near 14.5 south latitude and 120.1 east longitude. Cyclone Alessia had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. Alessia was moving to the east-southeast at 14 knots/16.1 mph/25.9 kph toward Western Australia. Forecasters are expecting Alessia to move in a more easterly direction toward Darwin.

Warnings and watches are already in effect for Western Australia. A Cyclone Warning is in effect from Cockatoo Island to Wyndham, and a Cyclone Watch is in effect from coastal areas from Wyndham to Cape Hotham.

According to the bulletin from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM, gales may develop along the northern Kimberley coast on November 23 as Alessia approaches the coast. The tropical cyclone is expected to brush the northern Kimberley coast and weaken as it approaches the west coast of the Top End on Sunday, November 24. Forecasters at the ABM expect rainfall to be limited to coastal areas. For updated warnings and watches, visit ABM's website at: http://www.bom.gov.au/wa/warnings/.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC forecasters expect Alessia to strengthen before making landfall near Darwin in the next couple of days. The JWTC noted that after Alessia makes landfall it will move across the swampy terrain of northern Australia just south of Darwin and should dissipate in five days (by November 27).

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

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[image-36]
MODIS Image of Alessia
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of newly-developed Tropical Cyclone Alessia on Nov. 22 at 02:20 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-51]
TRMM image of Alessia
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Tropical Storm Alessia on November 24 at 1325 UTC/8:25 a.m. EST and identified mostly light rain from the system (blue) with a small area (green) of moderate rainfall.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-78]
AIRS image of Alessia's remnants
On Nov. 25, NASA AIRS infrared data showed that System 02S's strongest thunderstorms (purple) with the potential for the heaviest rains stretched from Daly Waters in the north central part of the territory, east to Borroloola, south to Cape Crawford.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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[image-94]
MODIS image of Alessia
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of the reborn Tropical Storm Alessia in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria on Nov. 27 at 01:05 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-110]
TRMM Image of Alessia
NASA's TRMM satellite saw Alessia's rebirth on Nov. 27 in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Heavy rainfall (red) was occurring in bands of thunderstorms circling the storm.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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[image-126]
composite satellite image from TRMM and MTSAT of Alessia
This composite satellite image from TRMM and MTSAT from Nov. 29 shows areas of heavy rain are falling over the Northern Territory, west of Alessia's center, and cloud cover stretching over the Gulf of Carpentaria
Image Credit: 
NRL/JAXA/NASA
Image Token: 
[image-142]
Page Last Updated: November 29th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner