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Dylan (was 11P/99P - Southern Pacific Ocean)
January 31, 2014

[image-126][image-142]TRMM Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Dylan Make Landfall in Queensland

As Tropical Storm Dylan was making landfall in Queensland on January 30, NASA's TRMM satellite was capturing rainfall data on the storm.

Tropical storm Dylan was heading from the Coral Sea toward Australia's Queensland coast when it was viewed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite on January 30, 2014 at 0214 UTC/Jan. 29 at 9:14 a.m. EST. A rainfall analysis was done at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland using data collected by TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments. Rainfall rates were overlaid on an enhanced visible/infrared image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS) to complete the analysis. TRMM's TMI data revealed that moderate to heavy rainfall falling at the rate of over 31 mm/1.2 inches per hour was preceding Dylan's movement toward the Australian coast.

On January 31 at 0300 UTC/Jan. 30 at 10 p.m. EST, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final bulletin on Tropical Cyclone Dylan. By that time, Dylan had made landfall and was moving inland. It was centered about 178 nautical miles/204.8 miles/329.7 km southeast of Cairns, Australia near 21.3 south and 147.9 east. Dylan had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots/46 mph/74.0 kph and was quickly weakening and dissipating as it tracked over land.

At 8:02 a.m. EST on Friday, January 31, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM noted that ex-Tropical Cyclone Dylan continued moving south after crossing the coast east of Bowen early that morning. ABM warned residents from Bowen south to expect heavy rainfall from the dissipating low pressure system. ABM also noted that river rises were no longer expected from Dylan's rainfall in the Herbert, Ross, Bohle, Black and Burdekin Rivers and Bluewater Creek.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 


[image-94][image-110]Jan. 30, 2014 - NASA Gets 2 Views of Tropical Cyclone Dylan Making Landfall in Australia

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Dylan and captured both visible and infrared imagery of the storm as it began landfalling. The visible image showed the extent of the storm, while the infrared data looked at the temperature of cloud tops to determine strong storms were already affecting the coast. The southwestern side of the storm had already started to make landfall in Queensland.

Two instruments that fly aboard NASA's Aqua satellite were working to gather data on Tropical Storm Dylan. The MODIS instrument or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer took a visible picture of the storm, and the AIRS instrument or Atmospheric Infrared Sounder read temperature data using infrared light.

NASA's MODIS instrument captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Dylan approaching Queensland, Australia on January 30 at 3:50 UTC. The MODIS image showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms in the center of circulation with a wide and large band of thunderstorms wrapping into the center from the south. The AIRS instrument aboard Aqua captured infrared data three minutes before MODIS gathered the visible data. AIRS showed some of the thunderstorms moving on-shore in eastern Queensland had high cloud tops where temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C. When temperatures of that level are detected, NASA research shows those thunderstorms have the capability of dropping heavy rainfall.

Heavy rainfall, flash flooding, storm surge and gusty winds are all threats to Queensland as Dylan moves closer. A Cyclone Warning posted by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM remains in effect on January 30 and 31 for coastal and island communities from Cardwell to St. Lawrence extending to adjacent inland areas, including Collinsville.

At 1500 UTC/10:00 a.m. EST on January 30/1 a.m. on Jan. 31 local time (Brisbane, Australia) Tropical Cyclone Dylan had maximum sustained winds near 55 knots/63.2 mph/101.9 kph. It was 178 nautical miles/204.8 miles/329.7 km southeast of Cairns, Queensland, Australia and moving south at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph.

ABM noted that Tropical Cyclone Dylan is expected to cross the coast between Ayr and Bowen on Friday morning, January 31 (local time) around sunrise. For the full warning from ABM, visit: http://www.bom.gov.au/cgi-bin/wrap_fwo.pl?IDQ20023.txt

After landfall, Dylan is expected to dissipate within one day. Meanwhile, residents in Dylan's path are facing heavy rains, flash flooding, tropical-storm-force winds and storm surge.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centerr


[image-78]Jan. 29, 2014 - NASA-NOAA Satellite Sees Tropical Cyclone 11P Headed for Queensland

The NASA-NOAA Satellite known as Suomi NPP flew over newborn Tropical Cyclone 11P in the Coral Sea and captured a visible image of the newly developed storm as it moves toward a landfall in Queensland, Australia. Tropical Cyclone 11P developed from the low pressure area previously known as System 99P.

The VIIRS instrument aboard Suomi NPP captured an image of 11P on January 28 at 04:19 UTC/Jan. 27 at 11:19 p.m. EST. The image showed a more rounded circulation than the previous day, and bands of thunderstorms over the storm's southern semi-circle.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM has issued a Cyclone Warning for coastal and island communities from Cairns to St Lawrence, including Townsville and Mackay. A Cyclone Watch remained in effect for communities through the eastern interior including Charters Towers and Moranbah. For updated warnings and watches, please visit ABM's website at: www.bom.gov.au

11P was passing near Willis Island, and according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC, the radar there indicated that the low-level center was better organized, but bands of thunderstorms appeared fragmented and loosely organized.

At 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST on January 29, Tropical Cyclone 11P had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was centered 247 nautical miles/284.2 miles/457.5 km east of Cairns, Australia, near 17.1 south and 149.8 east. Tropical Cyclone 11P is moving to the southwest at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph.

The JTWC expects 11P to strengthen to 50 knots before making landfall. The JTWC forecast calls for landfall around 0000 UTC on January 31/7 p.m. EST on January 30 and the ABM forecast calls for 11P to cross the Queensland coast between Lucinda and Proserpine on January 31, Friday morning.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Jan. 28, 2014 - Watches Up in Australia as NASA Sees System 99P Developing

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical low pressure area designated as System 99P and infrared data shows that the low is getting organized. Meanwhile, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology posted a Cyclone Watch for coastal areas from Port Douglas to Proserpine, Queensland that are expected to be affected by the storm.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 99P the Southern Pacific Ocean on January 28 at 14:47 UTC/9:47 a.m. EST and saw that some of the thunderstorms had high cloud tops, where temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument known as AIRS captured infrared data on the low's clouds and revealed that some of the thunderstorms surrounding the low-level center of circulation had the potential for dropping heavy rainfall.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated multi-spectral satellite imagery showed that the low-level center was consolidating and that strong bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the elongated circulation.

System 99P was centered near 15.2 south and 153.4 east in the Coral Sea (Southern Pacific Ocean basin), about 215 nautical miles/247.4 miles/398.2 km east-northeast of Willis Island, Australia. Maximum sustained winds are near the threshold for depression status, currently as high as 30 to 35 knots along the northern and southern edges of the low. The low is located over waters warm enough (28C/86.6F) to support further development.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center give System 99P a high chance for becoming a tropical depression over the next day as it tracks to the southwest toward Willis Island, Australia. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM issued a forecast for the low and projected a path to make landfall just north of Townsville, Queensland on January 31. For updates from ABM, please visit: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/index.shtml.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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System 99P
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 99P the Southern Pacific Ocean on January 28 at 14:47 UTC/9:47 a.m. EST and saw some strong thunderstorms (high cloud tops) where temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Tropical Cyclone 11P
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone 11P on January 28 at 04:19 UTC, revealing a more rounded circulation than the previous day, and bands of thunderstorms over the storm's southern semi-circle.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA/NRL
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MODIS image of Dylan
NASA's MODIS instrument aboard the Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Dylan approaching Queensland, Australia on January 30 at 3:50 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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AIRS image of Dylan
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dylan on Jan. 30 at 0347 UTC and saw some of the thunderstorms moving on-shore had high cloud tops, where temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Dylan
On Jan. 30 at 0214 UTC the TRMM satellite saw moderate (green) to heavy rainfall (red) falling at the rate of over 31 mm/1.2 inches per hour was preceding Dylan's movement toward the Australian coast.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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mxf-OTuc-eY
This animation blends in moderate (green) and light (blue) rainfall rates within Tropical Cyclone Dylan as it was making landfall in Queensland on Jan. 30.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: January 31st, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner