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Pabuk (was 98W - Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
September 26, 2013

NASA Views a Transitioning Tropical-Storm Pabuk  [image-174][image-158]

Typhoon Pabuk weakened and the core of the storm was changing from a warm core tropical system to a cold core low pressure system as it continued paralleling the coast of Japan on Sept. 26. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the transforming storm that had lost its eye.

On Sept. 26, 2013 at 03:55 UTC/Sept. 25 at 11:55 p.m. EDT, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Pabuk skirting eastern Japan. MODIS imagery also showed a steady influx of cold air stratocumulus clouds into the low-level center of Pabuk, which was helping transition the storm.

On Sept. 26 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Extra-tropical storm Pabuk had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots/69 mph/111 kph. The center of Pabuk was located near 34.9 north and 146.7 east, about 441 nm south-southeast of Misawa, Japan. Pabuk continued to track to the northeast and has sped up to 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph per hour.

Satellite data revealed that Pabuk's low-level center has become elongated and more ragged on Sept. 26. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the entire tropical cyclone appears more asymmetrical and fragmented.

Pabuk is now part of a baroclinic cold air mass and is rapidly transforming into an extra-tropical cyclone. By the end of the day on Sept. 26, Pabuk is expected to be a cold core low pressure system over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final advisory on Pabuk.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sept. 25, 2013 - NASA Satellites See Typhoon Pabuk's Shrinking Eye Close[image-142] [image-126]

Typhoon Pabuk's eye was clear on visible and infrared NASA satellite imagery on Sept. 24, and one day later high clouds covered the center and Pabuk's eye was "closed." Satellite data also showed that Pabuk's eye shrunk by about 5 nautical miles in the last day.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Pabuk on Sept. 24 at 16:05 UTC/12:05 p.m. EDT, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument viewed the storm in infrared light. The AIRS data clearly showed that Pabuk had a 30 nautical mile/34.5 mile/55.5 km wide-eye. AIRS data also showed that the eye was surrounded by powerful thunderstorms that stretched high into the troposphere and were likely generating heavy rainfall. Infrared data revealed cloud top temperatures exceeding -63F/-52C that indicates powerful storms.

On Sept. 25 at 01:35 UTC/Sept. 24 at 9:35 p.m. EDT, as NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Pabuk, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm that showed the center filled in by high clouds. The eye has also diminished in size and was 25 nautical miles/28.7 miles/46.3 km in diameter.

By 0600 UTC on the Sept. 25, Pabuk's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots/103.6 mph/166.7 kph.  The typhoon was centered near 29.9 north latitude and 139.7 east longitude, about 361 nautical miles/415.4 miles/668.6 km south of Yokosuka, Japan. Pabuk was moving to the north-northeast 9 knots/10.3 mph/16.6 kph and is forecast to bypass Japan.

The Typhoon has been moving counter-clockwise around a large area of high pressure and is now rounding the northwestern edge of it. As a result, Pabuk is now on a north-northeasterly path that will shift to the northeast. Pabuk is expected to remain at sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as it transitions to an extra-tropical storm by Sept. 27.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 


Sept. 24, 2013 - NASA Sees Typhoon Pabuk's Veiled Eye [image-94] [image-110]

NASA's Aqua satellite orbit around the Earth took it right over Typhoon Pabuk and the image showed an eye veiled with some high clouds.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Pabuk on Sept. 24 at 04:05 UTC as it was nearing Japan. In the image, high clouds draped over Pabuk's eye. Pabuk's eye is about 30 nautical miles/34.5 miles/55.5 km wide, about three times larger than Typhoon Usagi's eye before it made landfall in China earlier in the week.

On Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Pabuk's maximum sustained winds were near 65 knots/75 mph/120.4 kph and some slight strengthening is expected. Pabuk's center was located near 26.4 north and 139.2 east, about 552 nautical miles/ 635.2 miles/1,022 km south of Yokosuka, Japan. Pabuk is currently moving to the northwest, but is expected to turn to the northeast.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast expects Pabuk to track parallel to the coast of Japan while now staying away from the big island. Pabuk is expected to become an extra-tropical cyclone in the next couple of days and gain frontal characteristics.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sept. 23, 2013 - Infrared NASA Image Shows Strength in Typhoon Pabuk's Eastern Side [image-78]

Typhoon Pabuk (was 98W) continued to strengthen as it moved north through the northwestern Pacific Ocean on Sept. 23, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the storm. The NASA image showed powerful thunderstorms east of the storm's center.

On Sept. 23 at 3:17 UTC/Sept. 22 at 11:17 p.m. EDT NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Pabuk in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured an infrared image. The AIRS image showed very high, powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures wrapped around the eastern side of the storm. Cloud top temperatures were colder than -63F/-52C, and were likely dropping heavy rainfall. 

On Sept. 23, Pabuk's center passed near Iwo To and continued tracking to northwest toward Japan. Just after passing Iwo To, Pabuk intensified from a tropical storm to a typhoon.  At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Typhoon Pabuk's maximum sustained winds had increased to 65 knots/75 mph/120 kph. Typhoon Pabuk was located just 41 nautical miles northwest of Iwo To, Japan near 25.5 north and 140.4 east. Pabuk is moving to the north-northwest at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.26 kph. 

After passing Iwo To, infrared satellite data showed that Pabuk had maintained form, and in fact had wrapped tighter around the broad and ragged low level circulation center.

Pabuk is expected to turn to the northeast, speed up and become extra-tropical in a couple of days as it moves parallel to the eastern coast of Japan, while remaining far at sea. Pabuk may bring rain and gusty winds to east central Japan, including Tokyo on Sept. 25 and Sept. 26 on its journey northeast through the northern Pacific.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Sept. 20, 2013 - TRMM Satellite Sees System 98W Organizing Near Guam, Marianas [image-51]

NASA's TRMM satellite data revealed heavy rainfall and banding of thunderstorms around the southern quadrant of System 98W in the northwestern Pacific near Guam and the Marianas Islands. Those are two signs that the low pressure area may be consolidating into a tropical depression.

At 1700 UTC/1 p.m. EDT on Sept. 20, System 98W was centered about 16.2 north and 146.7 east, about 195 nautical miles north-northeast of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. System 98W had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM passed over System 98W earlier in the day and observed its rainfall.

At the Naval Research Laboratory, NASA's TRMM satellite data was combined with infrared imagery from Japan's MTSAT-2 to provide a better picture of the low pressure area. The TRMM data showed that heavy rainfall was occurring over Guam at 0945 UTC/5:45 a.m. EDT.

Later on Sept. 20, at 3 p.m. EDT, Guam International Airport was still reporting heavy rain, and fog/mist and a temperature of 79F. Winds were blowing from the southwest at 14 mph/22.5 kph, gusting to 18 mph/28/9.

Infrared satellite imagery showed strong convection northeast of the center of circulation and convective banding of thunderstorms southwest of the center. Those thunderstorms in the southwestern bands were affecting Guam.    

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that strong vertical wind shear is appearing in the upper-levels of the atmosphere near System 98W. In fact, northeasterly winds are blowing at 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 kph. Wind shear can weaken a storm and even tear it apart, and there's even moderate wind shear of up to 20 knots/23 mph/37 kph happening in the storm's center.

The National Weather Service in Guam issued the following bulletin at 12 a.m. CHST on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 local time: A tropical disturbance continues to develop in the vicinity of the Marianas. Satellite and radar imagery indicate the heaviest rain associated with the tropical disturbance has shifted to the south and east of the Marianas. However...a brief heavy shower is still possible through Saturday. The latest computer models indicate that much of the weekend will be markedly drier than the past few days. The potential for heavy rainfall will return late Sunday into Monday as this system develops and moves northward. Light to gentle winds tonight will become southwest and increase to 25 to 30 mph by Saturday night as the disturbance moves northward.  Offshore seas of 8 to 10 feet tonight will steadily increase to between 11 and 13 feet by Monday as southwest winds increase across the Marianas over the next few days.    

Because the low-level center is consolidating the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects System 98W to become a tropical depression in the next 24 hours. System 98W has been moving to the north and is expected to continue moving in that direction over the next two days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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[image-36]
NASA's TRMM satellite data was combined with infrared imagery from Japan's MTSAT-2 to provide a better picture of the low pressure area.
NASA's TRMM satellite data was combined with infrared imagery from Japan's MTSAT-2 to provide a better picture of the low pressure area and showed that heavy rainfall was occurring over Guam at 0945 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/JAXA
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[image-51]
AIRS Image of Pabuk
On Sept. 23 at 3:17 UTC, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Pabuk in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured this infrared image. Powerful storms wrapped around the eastern side of the storm.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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[image-78]
MODIS image of Pabuk
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Pabuk on Sept. 24 at 04:05 UTC as it was nearing Japan. High clouds drape over Pabuk's eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-94]
AIRS image of Pabuk
On Sept. 24 at 03:59 UTC the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Typhoon Pabuk's visible eye and very cold (purple) cloud tops and powerful thunderstorms.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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[image-110]
AIRS image of Pabuk
This false-colored infrared image of Typhoon Pabuk was taken from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Sept. 24 at 16:05 UTC/12:05 p.m. EDT when Pabuk's eye was still visible.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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[image-126]
MODIS image of Pabuk
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Pabuk on Sept. 25 at 01:35 UTC/Sept. 24 at 9:35 p.m. EDT on its approach to Japan.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-142]
AIRS image of Pabuk
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite shows Pabuk when it was still a typhoon on Sept. 25 at 12:47 p.m. EDT and had an eye. Coldest, strongest storms appear in purple.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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[image-158]
MODIS image of Pabuk
On Sept. 26, 2013 at 03:55 UTC/11:55 p.m. Sept. 25 EDT, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Pabuk skirting eastern Japan.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-174]
Page Last Updated: September 26th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner