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04W ( was 94W - Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
March 25, 2014

[image-94]NASA Sees Remnants of TD04W Dissipating in South China Sea

The remnants of Tropical Depression 04W moved away from Palawan and into the South China Sea on March 25 as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over the South China Sea on March 25 at 02:56 UTC/March 25 at 10:56 p.m. EDT and gathered data on rainfall rates occurring in the remnants of TD04W. The image showed that the rainfall associated with the storm had moved away from Palawan and were only falling over the South China Sea. TRMM's Precipitation Radar instrument showed isolated areas where rain was falling at a rate of 1 inch/25.4 mm per hour. Over the next several hours, rainfall rates waned as strong easterly wind shear continued to weaken the storm.

By 14:30 UTC/10:30 a.m. EDT on March 25, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that the TD04W's remnants dissipated near 8.8 north and 115.6 east, that's about 540 nautical miles/621.4 miles/1,000 km east of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. TD04W is no longer suspect for regeneration.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]Mar. 24, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Depression 04W's Remnants Affecting Palawan

Tropical Depression 04W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on March 23 and marched across the southern Philippines. NASA's TRMM satellite spotted moderate rainfall occurring near Palawan the next day from the storm's remnants.

Formerly known as System 94W, the tropical low organized into Tropical Depression 04W (TD04W) on Sunday, March 23. TD04W then crossed through the southern and central Philippines on March 22 and 23, moving  from east to west through Mindanao and Visayas. At 04:32 UTC/12:32 a.m. EDT the depression had maximum sustained winds near 20 knots/23.0 mph/37.0 kph. At that time, TD04W was centered near 9.3 north and 124.6 east, about 225 nautical miles/258.9 miles/416.7 km northeast of Zamboanga, Philippines and moving in a westerly direction.

By March 24, the depression had weakened to a remnant low pressure area and was moving through the Sulu Sea. At 0600 UTC/2 a.m. EDT, TD04W was centered near 9.1 north latitude and 119.4 east longitude, about 50 nautical miles/57.5 miles/92.6 km southeast of Puerto Princesa, Palawan and bringing rainfall to the island of Palawan. Palawan is an island province of the Philippines in the Mimaropa region. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that maximum sustained surface winds were estimated at 10 to 15 knots/11.5 to 17.2 mph/ 18.5 to 27.7 kph. Minimum sea level pressure was estimated to be near 1009 millibars. There were no watches or warnings posted for Palawan on March 24.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite showed that the heaviest rainfall was occurring over the Sulu Sea and just off the coast of Aborlan (a municipality) and Puerto Princessa, the seat of government for Palawan. TRMM identified rainfall rates of up to 1.2 inches/30.4 mm per hour. A microwave image from TRMM also showed that the low has poor convective structure with an ill-defined low-level center.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects the remnants of 04W to continue moving in a west-southwesterly direction into the South China Sea. However, because of atmospheric conditions, there is a low chance that the remnant will re-organize into a depression over the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Mar. 21, 2014 - NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Tropical System 94W Affecting Philippines

The tropical low pressure area centered just east of the southern Philippines appeared more organized on visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite on March 21. System 94W appears to be developing and the Philippine authorities have already issued warnings on the system locally designated as "Caloy."

The MODIS instrument (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of System 94W coming together east of the southern Philippines on March 21 at 5:25 UTC/1:25 a.m. EDT. The image revealed a circulation with the center over the open waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The image showed bands of thunderstorms from System 94W's western quadrant was draped over the eastern Mindanao region (southern area) of the Philippines and bands of thunderstorms from the storm were over the waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

Warnings were posted by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) on March 21 at 5 p.m. Signal No. 1 is in effect for parts of the Visayas and Mindanao regions of the Philippines today, March 21.     

Signal No. 1 means that sustained winds of 18.6-37.2 mph/30-60 kph may be expected in at least 36 hours. In Visayas, those areas under Signal No. 1 include: Southern Leyte, Bohol, Siquijor, Southern Cebu, the southern part of Negros Occidental and the southern part of Negros Oriental.

In Mindanao, Signal No. 1 is in effect for Southern Leyte, Bohol, Siquijor, Southern Cebu, the southern part of Negros Occidental, and the southern part of Negros Oriental. For additional updates from PAGASA, please visit:  http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph//

On March 21 at 5 p.m. local time, PAGASA noted that the center of System 94W was located near 8.9 north latitude and 127.8 east longitude, about 310 km/192.6 miles  northeast of Davao City or at 170 km/105.6 miles East Northeast of Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center gives System 94W a high chance for developing into a tropical depression in the next day.  Meanwhile, PAGASA expects the low to move to the west-northwest over the next couple of days and cross the southern Philippines.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Aqua image of System 94 W in the NW Pacific
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of low pressure "System 94W" coming together east of the southern Philippines on March 21.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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Tropical Depression 04W
This composite image uses rainfall from NASA's TRMM satellite and visible data from the MTSAT-2 satellite and shows rain occurring over Palawan.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TD04W
This composite image from NASA's TRMM satellite and the MTSAT-2 shows the position of Tropical Depression 04W's remnants in the South China Sea, northwest of Palawan.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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[image-94]
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Page Last Updated: March 25th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner