LOADING...
Text Size
92B (Northern Indian Ocean - May 2014)
May 28, 2014

[image-170]NASA Sees Northern Indian Ocean System 92B's End 

The tropical low pressure area known as System 92B finally dissipated on the east central coast of India on May 27 after six days of struggling to develop. System 92B developed in the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean basin on May 21. NASA's TRMM, Aqua and Suomi NPP satellites captured data on the low throughout the ups and downs it experienced until wind shear finally took its toll on the system.

NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over System 92B on May 19 and 20 and captured data on System 92B's rainfall rates and cloud heights. At the time, TRMM showed that System 92B had some strong thunderstorms and was generating heavy rainfall. Some of the storms reached over 14km (about 8.7 miles) high.

On May 22 at 7:11 UTC/3:11 a.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 92B and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured infrared data on the low pressure area's cloud tops. Satellite imagery showed that the low-level circulation center was large and poorly defined with flaring and fragmented deep (or strong) convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms). The data showed two areas where thunderstorms had high cloud tops and very cold temperatures near -63F/-52C. Later in the day, wind shear increased and deep convection became more scattered and flared and dissipated over the storm's western side. 

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured data on System 92B on May 24. That data showed the bulk of low pressure area's clouds and showers were still being pushed west of center from persistent easterly vertical wind shear.

On May 25, System 92B's chances begin to improve again as it continued heading north in the Bay of Bengal. It was centered near 18.3 north latitude and 86.3 east longitude, just 90 nautical miles southeast of Brahmapur, India. System 92B's maximum sustained winds were estimated as high as 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph), and minimum sea level pressure was near 1002 millibars. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) then upped the low pressure area's chances of becoming a tropical depression in the next 24 hours to medium despite its close proximity to the east coast of India.

On May 26 at 06:30 UTC/2:30 a.m. EDT, the JTWC noted System 92B was "no longer suspect for tropical cyclone formation."

At 07:30 UTC/3:30 a.m. EDT, the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) issued a combination satellite image that showed the remnants of System 92B over Andhra Pradesh, India. Andhra Pradesh is one of India's 28 states, and is located on the southeastern coast facing the Bay of Bengal.

The NRL image combined rainfall rate data from NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission with visible imagery from the European Space Agency's METEO-7 satellite to provide a comprehensive look at the storm inside and out. The image showed the remnant clouds over Andhra Pradesh. Some areas within the state were experiencing rainfall at a rate of 0.2 inches per hour at that time.

The remnants of System 92B dissipated on May 27.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-154]May 23, 2014 - An Infrared NASA Eye Sees a Weaker System 92B

System 92B appears to have weakened in the last day as an infrared look at the tropical low pressure area's cloud temperatures have shown. NASA's AIRS instrument is an infrared "eye in the sky" that recently flew over the weaker tropical low pressure area.

On May 22 at 19:29 UTC/3:29 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 92B and infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument and the SSMIS instrument saw patchy deep convection flaring and dissipating over the western portion of a low-level circulation center. Earlier on May 22, the areas of strong thunderstorms were more persistent west of the center of circulation.

The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS) are satellite passive microwave radiometers. This series of instruments has been carried onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites since 1987.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted that System 92B has weakened in response to persistent easterly vertical wind shear. The JTWC expects that wind shear to continue for another day.

On May 23 at 02:30 UTC (May 22 at 10:30 p.m. EDT), the center of System 92B was located near 16.2 north latitude and 91.0 east longitude, about 370 nautical miles south of Chittagong, Bangladesh. Maximum sustained winds are between 20 and 25 knots, and minimum central pressure is near 1002 millibars.

JTWC noted "based on the observed weakening trend and considering the potential for redevelopment if vertical wind shear relaxes over the next few days, the potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is downgraded to medium."

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-108][image-124][image-140]May 22, 2014 - Two NASA Satellites See System 92B Headed North in Bay of Bengal

NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites captured radar and infrared data on developing tropical low pressure area System 92B as it now makes it way north through the Bay of Bengal.

On May 22 at 00:51 UTC, NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over System 92B as it was dropping heavy rainfall over the Bay of Bengal. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) revealed that rain was falling at the extreme rate of over 191 mm (about 7.5 inches) per hour in powerful convective storms in the center of the Bay of Bengal well to the east of India.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, TRMM's Precipitation Radar data were also used to construct a simulated 3-D view of 92B's rainfall structure looking toward the east from India. TRMM PR pulled away a veil of clouds and revealed that some powerful convective storm tops were reaching heights of almost 17 km (about 10.5 miles). The extreme rainfall in this area was returning radar reflectivity values of over 53.7 dBZ to the TRMM satellite.

On May 22 at 7:11 UTC/3:11 a.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 92B and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured infrared data on the low's cloud tops. Satellite imagery shows that the low-level circulation center is large and poorly defined with flaring and fragmented deep convection. The data showed two areas where thunderstorms had high cloud tops and very cold temperatures near -63F/-52C. Thunderstorms that high into the troposphere have been found to generate heavy rainfall. The areas of strong thunderstorms were north and west of the center of circulation.

By 08:00 UTC/4 a.m. EDT, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center estimated that System 92B had maximum sustained winds between 25 to 30 knots (28.7 to 34.5 mph/46.3 to 55.5 kph). Metsat satellite imagery indicated that the circulation center is located near 17.0 north latitude and 92.1 east longitude in the Bay of Bengal, about 315 nautical miles south of Chittagong, Bangladesh.

System 92B is moving north at 5 knots (5.7 mph/9.2 kph). Computer models vary on the development of the tropical low pressure area, but do expect it to continue drifting to the north and north-northwest.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that System 92B's potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours remains high.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 


[image-51][image-78][image-94]May 21, 2014 - NASA Sees Developing Tropical Cyclone in Bay of Bengal

A tropical low pressure area known as System 92B has been organizing in the Northern Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal and NASA's TRMM satellite has shown strong thunderstorms and heavy rainfall in the developing storm.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over System 92B on May 19 and 20 and captured data on System 92B's rainfall rates and cloud heights.

On May 19, 2014 at 1056 UTC (6:56 a.m. EDT) TRMM flew over a tropical low (92B) in the Bay of Bengal east of India. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument found that rain was falling at a rate of over 138 mm (about 5.4 inches) per hour in some strong convective storms.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, TRMM PR data were used to create a 3-D image that showed a simulated view of the tropical disturbance's rainfall structure. In the 3-D image, tall storms were shown reaching heights of over 14km (about 8.7 miles) and returning reflectivity values of over 52dBZ to the satellite.

TRMM had another fairly good look at 92B on May 20 at 1000 UTC (6:00 a.m. EDT). TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) had a better view than the PR instrument that flew over the northern edge of 92B. TMI showed that 92B was better organized than previously and estimated that rain was falling at a rate of over 33.8 mm (1.3 inches) per hour in some areas.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that a microwave image from Europe's METOP-B satellite on May 21 at 04:54 UTC (12:54 a.m. EDT) showed that the bulk of strong thunderstorms and deep convection in System 92B was over the storm's southern quadrant and wrapping into the low-level center. 

On May 21 at 07:30 UTC/3:30 a.m. EDT the JTWC gave System 92B a high chance for development. At that time the center of circulation was near 16.1 north latitude and 91.4 east longitude, about 375 nautical miles south of Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Another instrument on METOP-B looked at the developing storm's winds. The prime objective of Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) is to measure wind speed and direction over the oceans. An image from ASCAT on May 21 at 03:57 UTC showed that the circulation of 92B appeared elongated, with 35 to 40 knot winds over the southwestern quadrant and weaker winds (15 to 20 knots) over the northern semi-cicle. 

JTWC noted that the warm sea surface temperatures in the area will help with development. 

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
TRMM image of 92B
On May 19, 2014 at 1056 UTC NASA's TRMM satellite flew over System 92B in the Bay Of Bengal and found that rain was falling at a rate of over 138 mm (about 5.4 inches) per hour. TRMM data was overlaid on a METEOSAT-7 visible/infrared image.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-51]
3-D TRMM image of 92B
In this TRMM 3-D image of System 92B from May 20, rain was falling at a rate of over 33.8 mm (1.3 inches) per hour in some (red) areas.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-78]
Youtube Override: 
LFLyU3H7A6M
In this TRMM 3-D simulated flyby of System 92B from May 19, tall storms were shown reaching heights of over 14km (about 8.7 miles).
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-94]
AIRS image of 92B
May 22 at 7:11 UTC/3:11 a.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 92B and the AIRS instrument saw very cold cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C (purple) north and west of the center of circulation.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-108]
3-D TRMM image of 92B
In this TRMM 3-D image of System 92B from May 21, some powerful convective storm tops were reaching heights of almost 17 km (about 10.5 miles).
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-124]
Youtube Override: 
inFd0vH1GwU
In this TRMM 3-D simulated flyby of System 92B from May 21, some powerful convective storm tops were reaching heights of almost 17 km (about 10.5 miles).
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-140]
AIRS image of 92B
On May 22 at 19:29 UTC/3:29 p.m. EDT, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 92B and the AIRS instrument saw that the strong thunderstorms over the western quadrant had weakened.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-154]
Combo TRMM and METEO-7 satellite image shows the remnants of System 92B
This combination TRMM and METEO-7 satellite image shows the remnants of System 92B over east central India. The dark blue indicates rainfall at a rate of 0.2 inches per hour.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/JAXA/ESA
Image Token: 
[image-170]
Image Token: 
[image-62]
Page Last Updated: May 30th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner