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90E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
May 9, 2014

[image-94][image-110]NASA Sees System 90E Just After Earthquake Hit Mexico's Guerrero State

As the dissipating tropical low pressure system known as System 90E continued rain on Guerrero State in southern Mexico, the U.S. Geological Survey reported a 6.4 magnitude earthquake occurred there on Thursday, May 8 around noon local time (1 p.m. EDT). NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the low pressure area just three hours after the earthquake.

As showers fell on Guerrero State, USGS noted that the quake's center was 9.3 miles (5 km) north of Tecpan de Galeana, Mexico. That's about 60 miles (96.5 km) northwest of Acapulco and 172 miles (276.8 km) southwest of Mexico City. According to USGS, back on April 18, an 7.2 earthquake occurred just 40 miles from yesterday's epicenter.

A false-colored infrared image from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument showed high, cold cloud tops associated with the thunderstorms in System 90E moving over southern Mexico on May 8 at 20:11 UTC/4:11 p.m. EDT. Some of the cloud tops were near -63 F (-52C) indicating some potential for heavy rainfall.

On May 9, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that showers and thunderstorms associated with System 90E continued to become less organized during the early morning hours. The low pressure area is large and centered about 150 miles (241.4 km) southwest of Zihuatenejo, Guerrero State, Mexico.

The NHC discussion on May 9 noted that the upper-level winds have become unfavorable for development and this system, so System 90E now has a very low chance, near 0 percent of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours or over the next five days for that matter- which is good news for southwestern Mexico.

Despite not having the potential to develop, however, System 90E is expected to continue to produce locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds over portions of southwestern Mexico during the next day or so, according to NHC. The Mexican Weather Service noted that System 90E has the potential to bring torrential rainfall to Michoacán and Guerrero states totaling between 5.9 to 9.8 inches (150 to 250 mm). These rains could produce life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]May 08, 2014 - NASA Sees System 90E Moving Toward Southwestern Mexico

A tropical low pressure area known as System 90E is located a couple of hundred miles southwest of Zihuatenejo, Mexico today and was seen by NASA's Terra satellite on its way to a landfall.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of System 90E on May 7 at 18:50 UTC/ 2:50 p.m. EDT as it headed to a landfall in southwestern Mexico. The low appeared disorganized as it approached the southwestern coast of Mexico near the states of Michoacan and Guerrero.

According to NOAA's National Hurricane Center, System 90E "is producing a large area of showers and thunderstorms that will continue to spread onshore over portions of southwestern Mexico today." NOAA said that locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds will continue primarily over portions of the Mexican states of Michoacan and Guerrero today, May 8. These rains could produce life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

At 15:54 UTC (11:54 a.m. EDT) conditions in Uruapan, a city in the state of Michoacan, were overcast with winds from the north-northeast at 9 mph (8 knots). The air temperature was 64 F (18C). Farther south in Acapulco, located in the Mexican state of Guerrero, cumulonimbus clouds and towering cumulus clouds were reported at 15:42 UTC (11:42 a.m. EDT). Rain and light rain were reported in the two hours previous, according to observations listed on NOAA's National Weather Service Telecommunications Operations Center website. The winds were from the north-northeast at 13 mph (11 knots) and the air temperature was 80F (27C). 

The low pressure area became more disorganized today because of stronger upper-level winds. The National Hurricane Center gives this low a 20 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours and even over the next five days.  

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]May 07, 2014 - NASA Watching Year's First Tropical Low Headed for Southwestern Mexico

There's a tropical low pressure area in the Eastern Pacific Ocean today, about 8 days before the official Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins. NOAA's National Hurricane Center is giving it a 50 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression in the next two days, and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead to gather infrared data on it.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over developing tropical low pressure system 90E on May 8 at 08:41 UTC (4:41 a.m. EDT) and infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard, showed that some of the thunderstorms had high, cold cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C, indicating there was some strong uplift in the system.

According to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), System 90E is a broad area of low pressure located about 400 miles south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico (south-southeast of Michoacán state coast). The low pressure area consists of a large area of cloudiness and thunderstorms. The system is still organizing and satellite data suggest that it still lacks a well-defined center. 

NHC expects System 90E to move northeastward toward the southwestern coast of Mexico, so residents should pay attention to it. According to NOAA, conditions today, May 7 at 12:00 p.m. EDT at Colima, which is located on the southwestern Mexico coast, were mostly cloudy skies with calm winds and a temperature of 71F (22C). 

Even if not a tropical depression, low pressure areas containing thunderstorms with cold cloud top temperatures as those seen in today's AIRS imagery, can still drop heavy rainfall. NHC noted that "Regardless of development...locally heavy rains will begin to affect portions of southwestern Mexico today."

  NHC says that this systems as a medium chance (50 percent) of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 2 day and 5 days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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System 90E
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over developing tropical low pressure system 90E on May 8 at 08:41 UTC (4:41 a.m. EDT) and some thunderstorms had high, cold cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C (purple) indicating there was some strong uplift in the system.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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System 90E
This visible image of System 90E was captured by the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite on May 7 at 18:50 UTC/ 2:50 p.m. EDT as it headed to a landfall in southwestern Mexico. Baja California is seen to the north.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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AIRS image of 90E
This false-colored infrared image from NASA's AIRS instrument shows the high, cold cloud tops (purple) associated with the thunderstorms in System 91B as it moves over southern Mexico on May 8 at 20:11 UTC/4:11 p.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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This movie of imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from May 7 at 14:15 UTC to May 9 at 14:15 UTC shows System 90E's progression and movement on land in southwestern Mexico (it moves east out of the frame on May 9).
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Page Last Updated: May 9th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner