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33W (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
December 4, 2013

NASA Sees Rainfall Quickly Fade in Dying Depression 33W [image-78]

NASA's TRMM satellite noticed that rainfall became scarce in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean's thirty-third tropical depression in its second day of life. Tropical Depression 33W or TD 33W had weakened and TRMM showed only two isolated areas of heavy rainfall in the fragmented system.

At 0300 UTC on December 4/10 p.m. EST December 3, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center had already issued its final advisory on TD 33W. At that time, TD 33W's maximum sustained winds had already diminished to 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph. The center of the disorganized depression was located near 15.5 north and 139.1 east, about 354 nautical miles west-northwest of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. It was moving to the southeast at 4 knots/4.6 mph/7.4 kph.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM measured the rainfall rates occurring within TD 33W on December 4 at 1045 UTC/5:45 a.m. EST. Two isolated areas within the circulation of the depression revealed heavy rainfall where rain was falling at 2 inches/50 mm per hour. The remaining rainfall in the system was scattered and light, but no rainfall around the center of circulation. Multispectral satellite imagery showed that the low-level circulation center was exposed to outside winds.  

Vertical wind shear has literally taken the wind out of the depression. Wind shear increased to more than 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 kph and was pounding the depression. TD 33W is expected to move to the northeast and dissipate over the next day.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Dec. 03, 2013 - NASA Sees Thirty-third Tropical Depression Form in Northwestern Pacific  [image-51]

The Northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season continues with the formation of the thirty-third tropical depression today, December 3, 2013.Two NASA satellites provided a look at the newly formed depression's cloud cover and rainfall rates.

At 0320 UTC today, NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the newborn depression. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm, showing that the circulation had become more organized since the day before. The depression appeared as a rounded area of clouds on the MODIS image. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite also passed over the depression, but only over the northwestern edge. During the overpass, TRMM's Precipitation Radar instrument identified an area of moderate to heavy rainfall north of the center of circulation, where rain was falling at a rate of 1 inch/30 mm per hour.

On December 3 at 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST, Tropical Depression 33W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 kph. It was located approximately 369 nautical miles/424.6 miles/683.4 km west-northwest of Guam, near 16.0 north latitude and 138.9 east longitude. 33W was moving to the north at 6 knots/6.9 mph/11.1 kph but is expected to turn to the northeast. 

The National Weather Service does not expect Guam to be adversely affected by the depression as forecasts for the next several days call for mostly sunny skies. Wednesday, December 4 is expected to bring the breeziest conditions from the depression. The National Weather Service expects winds on that day to be from the east-southeast at 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Tropical Depression 33W to become extra-tropical in the next day or two. The depression is expected to curve to the northeast and continue in that general direction for the next couple of days toward the Northern Mariana Islands.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
MODIS Image of 33W
At 0320 UTC on December 3/10:20 p.m. EDT, Dec. 2, NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of the storm, showing that the circulation had become organized and appeared rounded.
Image Credit: 
NRL-Monterey/NASA
Image Token: 
[image-51]
TRMM image of 33W
NASA's TRMM satellite captured this image of Tropical Depression 33W's sparse rainfall on Dec. 4 at 1045 UTC. There were two isolated areas of heavy (red) rainfall.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-78]
Page Last Updated: December 4th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner