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Krosa (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
November 4, 2013

NASA Saw Heavy Rain in Typhoon Krosa Before it Hit Wind Shear[image-172][image-188][image-204]

NASA's TRMM Satellite observed heavy rainfall occurring in Typhoon Krosa before it ran into strong wind shear. On Nov. 1, Krosa was a Typhoon that was threatening Hainan Island, China and Vietnam. By Nov. 4 after moving through the South China Sea, Krosa weakened to a depression.

On November 1, 2013 at 1320 UTC/9:20 a.m. EDT NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite captured a good look at the rainfall rates occurring in Typhoon Krosa. Krosa had weakened slightly when it passed over the northern Philippines but had started to intensify once it got into the South China Sea. Rainfall data collected by TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments was overlaid on an enhanced infrared image at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. to create a picture of Krosa's rainfall. TRMM PR data revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 116mm/4.5 inches per hour) in Krosa's eye wall. Radar reflectivity values greater than 50 dBZ were found in the same area. A 3-D perspective view on the showed Krosa's vertical structure.

Krosa took its time moving from the northern Philippines east through the South China Sea and made a cyclonic loop that took a couple of days. On Nov. 2 at 05:45 UTC/1:45 a.m. EDT the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a view of Typhoon Krosa in the South China Sea, when it was still a typhoon and still had an eye. The next day, wind shear had taken a toll on the storm and weakened it.

By Nov. 4 Krosa was centered over open ocean, southeast of Hainan Island, and about 246 nautical miles south-southwest of Hong Kong, China. Maximum sustained winds had dropped to 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph and the depression was moving south-southwest at 11 knots/12.6 mph/20.3 kph. Strong wind shear is expected to weaken Krosa even more over the next couple of days. Satellite data on Nov. 5 did not detect any strong convection occurring in the depression.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final bulletin on the storm on Nov. 4 and forecast Krosa to move in a southwesterly direction where it will make landfall far south of Hue, Vietnam on Nov. 5.  

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Nov. 1, 2013 - NASA Satellite Catches a Wide-Eyed Typhoon Krosa [image-156]

Typhoon Krosa became wide-eyed in imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite as the storm moved past the Philippines and into the South China Sea. Krosa re-strengthened after it passed over the northern Philippines and its eye expanded by 10 nautical miles from the previous day.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Krosa on Nov. 5 at 05:05 UTC/1:05 a.m. EDT. Krosa's center had moved over northern Luzon, Philippines and into the South China Sea when Aqua flew overhead. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer known as MODIS that flies aboard Aqua captured a visible image of the storm revealing the 35-nautical mile-wide/ 40.2 mile/64.8 km eye. The image showed large bands of thunderstorms spiraling into the center of circulation.

On Friday, Nov. 1 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Typhoon Krosa had maximum sustained winds near 85 knots/97.8 mph/157.4 kph. It was centered near 19.5 north and 116.8 east, about 242 nautical miles southeast of Hong Kong, China. It was moving to the west-northwest at 9 knots/10.3 mph/16.6 kph, and generating 30-foot/9.1-meter-high waves in the South China Sea.

Krosa is moving west northwest across the South China Sea and forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect it to turn southwest as it approaches Hainan Island, China on Nov. 3. It is expected to make landfall near Hue, Vietnam on Monday, Nov. 4.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 31, 2013 - NASA Sees Halloween Typhoon Krosa Lashing Luzon, Philippines [image-110][image-142][image-126]

There's nothing more scary for Halloween than a typhoon, and the residents in Luzon, in the northern Philippines are being lashed by Typhoon Krosa today, Oct. 31. 

On Oct. 30 at 0525 UTC/1:25 a.m. EDT NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite captured a good daytime view of Typhoon Krosa. A rainfall analysis derived from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data  was combined into a visible and infrared image from TRMM's Visible and InfraRed Scanner (VIRS). TRMM PR data found precipitation falling at a rate of about 81mm/~3.2 inches per hour in strong convective storms near Krosa's center.

On Oct.31 at 0255 UTC, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument known as MODIS that flies aboard NASA"s Terra satellite captured a picture of Tropical Storm Krosa. The MODIS image showed Krosa's western edge over Luzon in the northern Philippines

At 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Krosa's center was over land in extreme northern Luzon, and headed for the South China Sea. At that time, Krosa's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots/103.6 mph/ 166.7 kph. The center of Krosa was located near 18.4 north and 121.2 east, about 227 nautical miles/261 miles/420 km north-northeast of Manila, Philippines. It was headed to the west-northwest at 12 knots/13.8 mph/22.22 kph.  

Satellite imagery on Oct. 31 showed that Krosa had an eye 25 nautical miles/28.7 km/46.3 km in diameter at landfall in northern Luzon.

Krosa is expected to re-intensify in the South China Sea and affect Hainan Island, China before making a final landfall in northern Vietnam.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro / Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oct. 30, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Krosa Approach the Philippines [image-94][image-78]

NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites captured visible and infrared data on intensifying Tropical Storm Krosa as it heads for a landfall in the northern Philippines. Krosa is known as "Vinta" in the Philippines.

Several warnings have been issued by PAGASA for areas of the Philippines. Signal No. 2 is in effect for area in Luzon. Signal 2 means winds of 37.2 to 62 mph/60 to 100 kph are likely in at least 24 hours. Areas under Signal 2 include: Cagayan, the Calayan group of islands, the Babuyan group of islands, Isabela, Kalinga, Apayao, Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, Abra and Mt. Province. 

There is also a signal 1 in effect for parts of Luzon. Signal 1 means winds of 18.6 to 37.2 mph/30 to 60 kph are likely in at least 36 hours. Signal 1 is in effect for the following areas:   La Union, Pangasinan, Benguet, Ifugao, Nueva Vizcaya, Nueva Ecija, Quirino, Aurora and the Batanes group of islands.

On Oct. 30 at 02:10 UTC, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Krosa east of the Philippines, and showed bands of thunderstorms were wrapping into the center from the north and south of the center. Krosa had not yet developed an eye, but the storm was intensifying.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument called AIRS that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured data on Oct. 30 at 0511 UTC/1:11 a.m. EDT. AIRS data showed strong thunderstorms wrapped tightly around Krosa's center, and in bands of thunderstorms feeding into the center. At 1059 UTC/6:59 a.m. EDT, microwave data also revealed that an eye was forming.

On Oct. 30 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT, Krosa had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots/69 mph/111.1 kph. Its center was located near 17.3 north latitude and 126.3 east longitude, about 374 nautical miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines. It was moving to the west at 14 knots/16.1 mph/25.9 kph. The warm sea surface temperatures of the Philippine Sea are expected to enable Krosa to reach typhoon status before it makes landfall.

Krosa is forecast to make a brief landfall over extreme northern Luzon on Oct. 31 before moving west into the South China Sea. Once there, it is expected to brush Hainan Island, China and make a final landfall in Vietnam sometime on Nov. 4, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Oct. 29, 2013 - NASA Sees Newborn Twenty-ninth Depression in the Philippine Sea  [image-51]

NASA infrared imagery revealed that bands of thunderstorms have been wrapping into the center of newborn Tropical Depression 29W, indicating it's organizing and strengthening in the Philippine Sea.

The Philippine Sea is located within the northwestern Pacific Ocean. It's located east and north of the Philippines and covers about 2 million square miles (5 million square kilometers).

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Depression 29W on Oct. 29 at 04:23 UTC/12:23 a.m. EDT. AIRS data revealed strong thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures exceeding -63F/-52C that indicated they were high in the troposphere. They thunderstorms appeared in bands west and east of the center. Those thunderstorms were part of bands that formed around the circulation center.

On Oct. 29 at 11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, Tropical Depression 29W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 kph. It was located near 15.7 north and 131.3 east, about 634 nautical miles/729.6 miles/1,174 km east of Manila, Philippines. 29W is moving to the west at 14 knots/16.1 mph/21.3 kph and is expected to continue moving in that general direction over the next couple of days.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that warm sea surface temperatures in the Philippine Sea (where it is currently moving through) will enable 29W to strengthen into a typhoon in the next one or two days.

29W is expected to move west crossing over Luzon (the northern Philippines) as a tropical storm sometime on Oct. 31 then move into the South China Sea.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Tropical Depression 29W
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on Tropical Depression 29W on Oct. 29 at 04:23 UTC/12:23 a.m. EDT and saw strong thunderstorms (purple) west and east of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Krosa
This false-colored infrared image of Tropical Storm Krosa was taken from NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 30 at 0511 UTC/1:11 a.m. EDT. Strongest storms appear in purple.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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MODIS image of Krosa
On Oct. 30 at 02:10 UTC, NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Krosa east of the Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM Image of Krosa
On Oct. 30, NASA's TRMM satellite found precipitation falling at a rate of about 81mm/~3.2 inches per hour in strong convective storms near Krosa's center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Krosa
On Oct.31 at 0255 UTC, NASA"s Terra satellite captured this picture of Tropical Storm Krosa's western edge over Luzon in the northern Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-126]
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In this flyby animation of Oct. 30, NASA's TRMM satellite found precipitation falling at a rate of about 81mm/~3.2 inches per hour in strong convective storms near Krosa's center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
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Typhoon Krosa
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Krosa on Nov. 5 at 05:05 UTC/1:05 a.m. EDT and captured Krosa with an expanded eye. Credit:
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM imageof Krosa
On Nov. 1, NASA's TRMM satellite found precipitation falling at a rate of about 116 mm/ 4.5 inches per hour in strong convective storms near Krosa's center.
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MODIS image of Krosa
On Nov. 2 at 05:45 UTC/1:45 a.m. EDT the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this view of Typhoon Krosa in the South China Sea, when it was still a typhoon.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Youtube Override: 
H5TnqK7WHPQ
In this flyby animation of Nov. 1, NASA's TRMM satellite found precipitation falling at a rate of about 116 mm/ 4.5 inches per hour in strong convective storms near Krosa's center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-204]
Page Last Updated: November 4th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner