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Guito (was 15S - Southern Indian Ocean)
February 21, 2014

[image-174]NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Guito Exit the Mozambique Channel

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Guito as it exited the Mozambique Channel and moved into the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Guito on Feb. 21 at 07:05 UTC/2:05 a.m. EST and took a visible image of the storm exiting the Mozambique Channel. The image showed bands of thunderstorms were still wrapping around the western quadrant of the storm.

At 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Guito still had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots/69.0 mph/111.1 kph. It was located just south of the Mozambique Channel (the waterway between Mozambique and the island nation of Madagascar. Guito had moved into the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean and was moving south at 12 knots/13.8 mph/22.2 kph.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery also showed a tightly-wrapped, partially-exposed low-level circulation center. The strongest thunderstorms were located over the western and southern quadrants. Microwave satellite imagery showed an eye feature still existed.

Guito is expected to drift south and start to weaken on Feb. 22, becoming extra-tropical over the next several days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36][image-110][image-142][image-158]Feb. 20, 2014 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Saw Extreme Rainfall from Tropical Cyclone Guito

Tropical Cyclone Guito has been a powerful rainmaker, and fortunately, data from NASA's TRMM satellite shows that the heaviest rainfall has occurred over the open waters of the Mozambique Channel and not over land.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite had a look at tropical cyclone Guito in the Mozambique Channel on February 18, 2014 at 1525 UTC/10:25 a.m. EST. The early evening (local time) view occurred only about three hours after Guito attained tropical storm intensity of 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph).

TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) had better coverage of Guito than the Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument whose swath was well to the south of the tropical cyclone's center of circulation. TRMM TMI revealed that Guito was producing rain at a rate of over 50mm/~ 2 inches per hour in the center of the Mozambique Channel and scattered light rain on Madagascar's western coast.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. a rainfall anomaly analysis was made by comparing rainfall data compiled during the twelve year period from 2001-2012 to "near real-time" Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis data collected for the same period. That analysis showed that rainfall in the northern Mozambique Channel has been above normal for the past month.

These rainfall estimates were used to create a simulated 3-D perspective view with higher precipitation amounts appearing to be taller than lower amounts. The highest totals, with amounts in the Mozambique Channel greater than 430 mm/~16.9 inches.

On Feb. 20 at 0800 UTC/3:00 a.m. EST, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite showed that Cyclone Guito had moved farther south in the Mozambique Channel that the previous day. The MODIS image also showed that Guito's western fringes were brushing over Mozambique. In addition, multispectral satellite imagery showed that the strong convection associated with the low-level center of circulation had decreased.

At 0900 UTC/4:00 a.m. EST, Guito was in the southern Mozambique Channel near 25.3 south latitude and 38.6 east longitude. That puts Guito's center over 575 nautical miles from the Capital city of Antananarivo, Madagascar. Guito's maximum sustained winds were near 65 knots/74.5 mph/120.4 kph (hurricane-force). It was moving to the south at 13 knots/14.9 mph/24.0 kph.

Guito is heading southeast and out of the Mozambique Channel and into the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that after 24 hours (by February 21 at 0900 UTC/4:00 a.m. EST), cooler sea surface temperatures and increasing vertical wind shear will take a toll on the tropical cyclone and start to weaken it.

JTWC forecasters expect by the second day that Guito will being transitioning into an extra-tropical storm, a process that will take another day over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.

Text credit:  Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
SSAI / NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 


[image-94]Feb. 19, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees a Ragged Eye Develop in Tropical Cyclone Guito

NASA satellite data was an "eye opener" when it came to Tropical Cyclone 15S, now known as Guito in the Mozambique Channel today, Feb. 19, 2014. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Guito and visible imagery revealed a ragged eye had developed as the tropical cyclone intensified.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Guito on Feb. 19 at 1140 UTC/6:40 a.m. EST as it continued moving south through the Mozambique Channel. The image revealed a ragged-looking eye with a band of strong thunderstorms wrapping from the northwestern to the southeastern quadrants of the storm.

[image-78]On Feb. 19 at 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone Guito's maximum sustained winds near 60 knots/69 mph/111 kph. Guito was centered near 21.5 south latitude and 39.6 east longitude, about 405 nautical miles/466.1 miles/750.1 km west of Antananarivo, Madagascar. Guito has been moving to the south at 10 knots/11.5 mph/18.2 kph. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that a mid-latitude trough (elongated area) of low pressure is approaching Guito from the southwest. That trough is expected to cause Guito to recurve southeastward as the storm transitions into an extra-tropical storm over the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[image-51]Feb. 18, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone 15S Form in the Mozambique Channel

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 15S as it formed in the Mozambique Channel on Feb. 18 and the AIRS instrument aboard gathered infrared data on its cloud top temperatures and potential.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical cyclone 15S on Feb. 18 at 10:53 a.m. EST. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured infrared data on the tropical system that showed the highest cloud tops and strongest thunderstorms were in a band that stretched from the east to the south of the center. Cloud top temperatures were near -63F/-52C, indicating high, powerful thunderstorms with potential for heavy rainfall. The eastern-most edge was over western Madagascar and the southwestern extent reached Mozambique on the African mainland.

On February 18 at 1500 UTC/10 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone 15S had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph, making it a tropical storm. 15S was centered near 18.3 south and 40.3 east, about 375 nautical miles/431.5 miles/694.5 km west of Antananarivo, Madagascar. It was moving to the south at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph and is expected to strengthen to hurricane-force over the next couple of days. It is generating 10 foot high waves in the Mozambique Channel.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect 15S to drift south through the Mozambique Channel over the next couple of days and emerge in the Southern Indian Ocean in cooler waters. 

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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This animation of rainfall gathered from February 11-19, 2014 by NASA's TRMM satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Guito produced as much as 16.9 inches/430 mm of rainfall in the center of the Mozambique Channel and scattered light rain on Madagascar's western coast.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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AIRS image of Tropical Cyclone 15S
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical cyclone 15S on Feb. 18 at 10:53 a.m. EST. The highest cloud tops and strongest thunderstorms (purple) were in a band that stretched from the east to the south of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Tropical Cyclone Guito
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone Guito on Feb. 19 at 1140 UTC/6:40 a.m. EST as it continued moving south through the Mozambique Channel in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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MODIS image of Tropical Cyclone Guito
On Feb. 19 at 07:15 UTC/2:15 a.m. EST, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Guito in the Mozambique Channel, showing a ragged eye developing.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM image of Guito
A TRMM rainfall anomaly analysis compiled from 2001-2012 data with "near real-time" Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis data collected for the same period, shows that in part due to Guito, rainfall in the northern Mozambique Channel has been above normal for the past month.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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TRMM Image of Guito
On Feb. 18 TRMM revealed that Guito was producing rain at a rate of over 50mm/~ 2 inches per hour (red) in the center of the Mozambique Channel and scattered light rain on Madagascar's western coast.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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TRMM image of rainfall from Guito
This image of rainfall gathered from February 11-19, 2014 by NASA's TRMM satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Guito produced as much as 16.9 inches/430 mm of rainfall in the center of the Mozambique Channel and scattered light rain on Madagascar's western coast.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Guito
This visible image from NASA's Terra satellite on Feb. 20 at 0800 UTC shows that Cyclone Guito has moved south in the Mozambique Channel, and its western fringes were brushing over Mozambique.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Guito
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Guito on Feb. 21 at 07:05 UTC and took this visible image of the storm exiting the Mozambique Channel.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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Page Last Updated: February 21st, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner