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Fobane (was 14S - Southern Indian Ocean)
February 13, 2014

[image-140]Tropical Cyclone Fobane Appears Headed for Dissipation

Tropical Cyclone Fobane has been battered by increasing vertical wind shear and moving over cooler waters. A METEO-7 satellite image showed the effect of strong wind shear that pushed the strongest thunderstorms south of the center of circulation.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, the wind shear and cooler waters will lead to its dissipation in the next day or two. The European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites' METEO-7 satellite captured an infrared image of Fobane on Feb. 13 at 1800 UTC/1 p.m. EST.   The image showed that the strongest thunderstorms within Fobane were south of the center, pushed from the northerly vertical wind shear.

At 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST on February 13, Tropical Cyclone Fobane's maximum sustained winds dropped to 40 knots46 mph/74 kph. It was centered near 29.7 south latitude and 63.3 east longitude about 702 nautical miles/ 807.8 miles/1,300 km southeast of St. Denis, La Reunion Island.

Fobane continues to track over the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean and is expected to move southwest and dissipate.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-124]Feb. 12, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Cyclone Fobane Spinning Down

Tropical Cyclone Fobane continues to be battered with increasing vertical wind shear as it moves southward through the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and saw the bulk of precipitation and bands of thunderstorms were south of the center.

On Feb. 12 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone Fobane had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots/51.7 mph/83.3 kph. Fobane was centered near 27.6 south latitude and 64.7 east longitude, about 596 nautical miles southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Fobane is moving to the south-southwest at 11 knots/12.6 mph/20.3 kph. 

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Fobane on Feb. 12 at 0530 UTC/12:30 a.m. EST as it continued spinning down in the Southern Indian Ocean. The image showed a tightly-wrapped core and still appears well-organized. Bands of strong thunderstorms appear in the southwestern quadrant of the storm.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC looked at features stacked over Fobane in different layers of the atmosphere. JTWC noted that an upper level low pressure area embedded in a mid-latitude trough (elongated area of low pressure) is situated over Fobane's low-level center. Because of that upper-level low, convection and thunderstorm development has been stifled over the last day and a half, as it has created strong vertical wind shear between 20 to 30 knots/23.0 to 34.5 mph/37.0 to 55.5 kph) near the low-level center of Fobane. In addition to the upper-level atmospheric cocktail weakening Fobane, the storm is also moving into cooler sea surface temperatures which will weaken it more.

The JTWC expects Fobane to dissipate in the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94][image-110]Feb. 11, 2014 - NASA Still Sees Some High Thunderstorms in Tropical Cyclone Fobane

Tropical Cyclone Fobane was located southeast of Reunion Island in the southwest Indian Ocean when the TRMM satellite passed over and captured rainfall and cloud data on the storm. TRMM saw that despite Fobane weakening, there was still some punch left in a few of the thunderstorms within.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Fobane on February 11, 2014 at 0035 UTC. Fobane was very small but contained a few powerful convective thunderstorms near the tropical cyclone's center of circulation. TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) measured rain falling at a rate of over 68 mm/~2.7 inches per hour.

TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument data was used to create a 3-D image of the storm. Those data found a few of the powerful storms near FOBANE's center were reaching heights of over 14 km/~8.7 miles.

At 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST on February 11, Fobane's maximum sustained winds had dropped to 45 knots/51.7 mph/83.3 kph. Fobane was far from land areas and centered near 24.5 south and 66.9 east, about 602 nautical miles/692.8 miles/1,115 km east-southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Fobane is moving to the south-southwest at 9 knots/10.3 mph/16.6 kph and is expected to continue weakening.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Fobane to dissipate over the next day or two.

Text credit:  Harold F. Pierce
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 


[image-78]Feb. 10, 2014 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Eyes Rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Fobane

Some towering thunderstorms were spotted in Tropical Cyclone Fobane as NASA's TRMM satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on February 10. Fobane was formerly Tropical Cyclone 14S and when it strengthened into a tropical storm it was renamed.

NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency manages the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM. TRMM has the capability to measure rainfall rates from space and data that can be used to determine the heights of thunderstorms that make up a storm. When TRMM passed over Tropical Cyclone Fobane on February 10 at 0228 UTC/Feb. 9 at 9:28 p.m. EST, it spotted some thunderstorms up to 14 km/8.6 miles, where rainfall rates were near 35 mm/1.3 inches near the center of circulation.

On February 10 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone Fobane, known on La Reunion island as Tropical Cyclone 11/20132014,  was located near 22.5 south latitude and 72.6 east longitude, about 973 nautical miles/1,120 miles/1,802 km east of St, Denis, La Reunion. Fobane's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots/63.2 mph/101.9 kph and the storm was weakening. It was moving to the southwest at 21 knots/24.1 mph/ 38.8 kph.

Fobane has moved into an area of moderate to strong vertical wind shear, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. That wind shear is not expected to let up and Fobane is moving into cooler waters, so the storm is expected to continue to weaken.

Fobane is expected to continue moving in a southerly direction over open waters over the next several days as it passes far to the southeast of La Reunion Island.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Feb. 7, 2014 - NASA Spots Fourteenth Tropical Cyclone of Southern Indian Ocean Season

The fourteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season was born as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

On February 7 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone 14S had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located about 814 nautical miles/936.7 miles/1,508 km east-northeast of Port Louis, Mauritius near 14.8 south and 70.4 east. At that time, 14S was moving to the south near 8 knots/9.2 mph/14.8 kph.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that multispectral satellite imagery showed that the low-level center is exposed to outside winds and that the center is actually elongated (not a good thing for maintaining strength).

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 14S on February 7 and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured infrared data. Cloud top temperatures in excess of -70C/-94F were seen north of the center of circulation indicating strong convection and powerful thunderstorms.

14S has since turned to the southeast and is expected to intensify a little before turning southwest and weakening.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Terra image of 14S
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 14S on Feb. 7 and captured this infrared image. The strongest thunderstorms (red) are north of the center.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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TRMM image of Fobane
When TRMM passed over Tropical Cyclone Fobane on February 10 at 0228 UTC/Feb. 9 at 9:28 p.m. EST, it spotted some thunderstorms up to 14 km/8.6 miles, where rainfall rates were near 35 mm/1.3 inches (green) near the center of circulation.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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3-D image of Fobane from TRMM
This is a simulated 3-D view using data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar instrument. It shows a few powerful storms near Fobane's center were reaching heights of over 14km (~8.7 miles) on Feb. 11.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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This TRMM flyover is a simulated 3-D view of Fobane that shows a few powerful thunderstorms near the center were reaching heights of over 14km (~8.7 miles) on Feb. 11.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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MODIS image of Fobane
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Cyclone Fobane on Feb. 12 at 0530 UTC as it continued spinning down in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA MODIS Rapid Response
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METEO-7 satellite image of Fobane
This infrared image of Fobane was taken from Europe's METEO-7 satellite on Feb. 13 at 1800 UTC/1 p.m. EST. The strongest storms were south of the center, pushed from the northerly vertical wind shear.
Image Credit: 
NRL/EOEMS
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Page Last Updated: February 13th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner