LOADING...
Text Size
Glenda (was 14S - South Indian Ocean)
February 27, 2015

[image-96]NASA's Terra Satellite Sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda Stretching Out

NASA's Terra satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Glenda was being stretched out by wind shear on Feb. 27.

When Terra passed over the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 27, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm. In the image, the bulk of clouds associated with the storm appeared to be pushed southeast of the center and away from the islands of Mauritius and La Reunion.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted today, Feb. 27, "animated multispectral satellite imagery shows the system has begun to show signs of elongation as the main convective bands are displaced eastward of a partially-exposed low-level circulation center."

At 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST), Glenda's maximum sustained winds had dropped to near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph). Glenda was centered near 22.4 south latitude and 67.2 east longitude, about 573 nautical miles (659.4 miles/1,061 km) east-southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius. Glenda was moving to the south at 7 knots (8 mph/12.9 kph).

JTWC reported in their upper-level atmosphere analysis that Glenda is located in a "marginal environment with moderate vertical wind shear offset by excellent poleward outflow." 

By Saturday, Feb. 28, Glenda is expected to transition to an extra-tropical storm and become a cold-core system.  

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-80]Feb. 26, 2015 - NASA Sees the Tropical Cyclone Glenda Away from Land

NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on the Southern Indian Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Glenda that showed powerful thunderstorms circling the storm's center.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Glenda and the AIRS instrument aboard captured infrared data on the storm on Feb. 25 at 06:47 UTC (1:47 A.M. EST). At that time, Glenda's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). The infrared data measured cloud top temperatures and found the thunderstorms surrounding the center, were high, and powerful, with cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C. NASA research has shown that storms with cloud tops that cold have the potential to drop heavy rain. The infrared image also showed a hint of an eye forming in the center of circulation.

On Feb. 26 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST), Tropical Cyclone Glenda's maximum sustained winds remained near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph), but it is expected to strengthen. It was centered near 20.7 south latitude and 67.6 east longitude, about 586 nautical miles (674 miles/1,085 km) east of Port Louis, Mauritius, far from land. Glenda was moving to the south-southwest at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted "Animated multispectral satellite imagery depicts thinning convection with tightly-curved banding wrapping into a partially-exposed low-level circulation center. Although the sea surface temperatures and ocean heat content are marginal, favorable upper-level conditions are expected to persist, allowing moderate Intensification over the next 36 hours."

Glenda is expected to gradually intensify and then turn southeast and transition into an extra-tropical storm.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Feb. 25, 2015 - NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Glenda May be Developing an Eye

Tropical Cyclone Glenda is strengthening in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite saw a potential eye developing when it passed overhead on Feb. 25.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Glenda on Feb. 25 at 08:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EST). The image shows bands of thunderstorms wrapping around and into the low-level center of circulation, and the hint of an eye developing.

Tropical Storm 14S has been renamed Tropical Storm Glenda as it continued to strengthen. At 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) on Feb. 25, Glenda's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph). It was centered near 17.6 south latitude and 69.1 east longitude, about 661 nautical miles (760 miles/1,224 km) south-southwest of Diego Garcia. Glenda was moving to the west-southwest at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph).

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Glenda to strengthen near 95 knots (109.3 mph/176 kph) before beginning to weaken in a couple of days. Glenda is no threat to land and is expected to turn to the southeast and become extra-tropical.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36]

Feb. 24, 2015 - NASA Terra Satellite Spots New Tropical Cyclone 14S

A tropical low pressure area designated as System 90S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean on February 21, 2015 and has been slowly organizing and consolidating. Three days later System 90S became Tropical Storm 14S as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

On Feb. 24 at 05:25 UTC (12:25 a.m. EST), NASA's Terra satellite flew over newborn Tropical Cyclone Fourteen S. The MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument took a visible picture of the storm that showed strong thunderstorms circling the center. The image also showed fragmented bands of thunderstorms from the east to the south, wrapping into the center of circulation from the southwestern quadrant of the storm. Another large more organized band of thunderstorms wrapped into the center from the western side of the storm.

At 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST), Tropical Storm 14S had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/62 kph). It was centered near 16.2 south latitude and 72.2 east longitude, about 546 nautical miles (628.3 miles/1,011 km) south of Diego Garcia. It was moving to the west at 5 knots (5.7 mph/ 9.2 kph) and it no threat to land areas. 

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect 14S to gradually intensify over the next three days while moving west. The system is forecast to peak at 75 knots before turning to the southeast and becoming extra-tropical.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Terra image of 14S
On Feb. 24 at 05:25 UTC, NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of newborn Tropical Cyclone Fourteen in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-36]
Aqua image of Glenda
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Glenda in the Indian Ocean on Feb. 25 at 08:55 UTC (3:55 a.m. EST).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-51]
Aqua image of Glenda
NASA's Aqua passed over Glenda on Feb. 25 at 06:47 UTC and saw strong thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C (purple) and a hint of an eye forming.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-80]
Terra image of Glenda
NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Glenda on Feb. 27 that revealed the bulk of storm's clouds pushed southeast of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-96]
Image Token: 
[image-62]
Page Last Updated: February 27th, 2015
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner