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Halong (was 11W - Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
August 12, 2014

A View of Typhoon Halong from NASA's International Space Station [image-143]

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station captured this photograph of Tropical Storm Halong as it moved across southern Japan on August 10.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final bulletin on Halong on August 10 at 0300 UTC (August 9 at 11 p.m. EDT). AT that time, Halong had weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kph). It was centered near 34.1 north latitude and 134.3 east longitude, about 110 nautical miles east of Iwakuni, Japan. Halong was moving to the northeast at 13 knots (14.9 mph/24.0 kph) and was transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.

Halong then moved toward Russia's far east coast. On August 11, Halong's outer bands still affected northern Japan on its journey north through the Sea of Japan.  

Text:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 10, 2014 - Tropical Storm Halong Moving Away From Japan[image-111]

Halong is now located 110 nautical miles east of Iwakuni, Japan and has been tracking northeastward at 13 knots over the past six hours.  The Joint Typhoon Warning Center has closed the book on Halong and will not be issuing further updates on this storm, however, they will be monitoring it in case of regeneration which can happen to these types of storms.

The effects of the storm were widespread and caused the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) to issue a rare emergency weather warning for Mie prefecture as Halong dumped record-rainfall on Japan.That warning prompted the evacuations of some 500,000 people in two towns in Mie prefecture as at least 17 inches of rain were recorded during a 24 hour period in the town of Hakusan.

[image-127]The JMA said the storm, packing winds of up to 100 km/h, was expected to dump more rain in eastern and northern Japan by Monday morning, and warned of landslides and floods.  Japan was also shaken Sunday afternoon by a magnitude-6.1 earthquake that struck off the northeastern coast. There was no danger of a tsunami, and there were no immediate reports of any injuries or damage.

Text credit:  Lynn Jenner
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 09, 2014 - NASA's Terra Satellite Sees Now Tropical Storm Halong Over Japan [image-95]

Downgraded from a typhoon to a tropical storm ,Halong is located approximately 121 miles south southeast of Iwakuni, Japan and is tracking north northeastward at 10 knots over the past six hours.  Infrared satellite imagery shows the now tropical storm is starting to weaken as it approaches the southwestern coast of Japan.  Overall organization of the storm has been diminishing as the outer bands of the storm have begun to contact land.  The eyewall, though, is still well-defined and can be seen clearly in the Terra image.

Halong is expected to be making landfall within the next few hours. This is when the weakening of the system will intensify as land induced frictional effects begin. Once Halong tracks into the Sea of Japan continued rapid weakening will
continue as the sea surface temperatures will not be favorable to sustain the storm.

Text credit: Lynn Jenner
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 08, 2014 - NASA's Aqua Satellite Captures Halong's Movements Near Japan[image-79]

Halong's current position is 304 miles south southeast of Sasebo, Japan and it is moving north northeast at 7 knots per hour.  The maximum sustained winds in Halong are 70 knots gusting to 85.  Maximum significant wave height is 30 feet.

Halong is moving north and will broadly maintain current strength until landfall in mainland Japan. It is expected to rapidly transition to an extra-tropical cyclone as it makes landfall in Central Shikoku and dissipate over the Sea of Japan.

Text credit:  Lynn Jenner with information from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
 


[image-284]Aug. 07, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Halong Approaching Japan

NASA's Terra satellite grabbed a look at Typhoon Halong as it was nearing the Japanese islands of Minamidaito and Kitadaito and headed for a landfall in the main islands of southern Japan.

The MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Halong on August 7 at 02:35 UTC, as it continued approaching southern Japan. The image showed thunderstorms tightly wrapped around the center of circulation. In addition there was a large, thick band of thunderstorms that wrapped into the center from the eastern side of the storm.  The image showed that Halong's 30 nautical-mile wide eye had become cloud-filled.

On August 7 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Halong had maximum sustained winds near 75 knots (86.3 mph/138.9 kph). It was centered near 26.1 north latitude and 131.7 east longitude, about 510 nautical miles (586.9 miles/944.5 km) south of Iwakuni, Japan. Halong has tracked northward at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction. Halong is a powerful storm that is generating large and dangerous swells that will affect the Japanese islands. Maximum significant wave height was near 38 feet (11.5 meters).

At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Halong was passing about 25 nautical miles (28.7 miles/46.3 km) east of Minamidaito and Kitadaito Islands, which reported maximum sustained surface winds of hurricane strength, near 65 knots (74.8 mph/120.4 kph). The islands also reported a minimum central pressure of 954.3 millibars.  

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Halong to make landfall in southern Japan with maximum sustained winds near 85 knots on August 9.

Halong is expected to affect the main islands of Japan on August 9, crossing over southern Japan and moving into the Sea of Japan by August 10 as a tropical storm.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-63][image-254][image-270]Aug. 06, 2014 - Typhoon Halong Opens Its Eye Again for NASA

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Halong on its northern journey through the western North Pacific Ocean, it became wide-eyed again after going through eyewall replacement.

Eyewall replacement happens when the thunderstorms that circle the eye of a powerful hurricane are replaced by other thunderstorms. Basically, a new eye begins to develop around the old eye and it usually indicates a weakening trend.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard Aqua captured a visible image of Halong on August 6 at 04:30 UTC (12:30 a.m. EDT). The image showed powerful bands of thunderstorms swirling into the center from the northwestern quadrant that wrapped entirely around the cyclone. The image shows the island of Okinawa hundreds of miles north-northwest of Halong's eye.

The day before, August 5, NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite saw Typhoon Halong on August 5, 2014 at 1550 UTC (11:50 a.m. EDT). Halong was still a strong violent category 2 typhoon with winds of 85 knots (97.8 mph/57.4 kph).  Rainfall derived from TRMM's Precipitation Radar instrument revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 87 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour south of the Halong's eye.

Also on August 5, subsidence, or sinking air was inhibiting the development of thunderstorms on the northern side. Today, there has been an increase in organization of the eyewall as a band of strong thunderstorms expanded in that northern quadrant.

On August 6 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Halong's maximum sustained winds were still at 85 knots ((97.8 mph/57.4 kph).  Halong was centered near 23.4 north and 130.7 east, about 255 nautical miles (293.4 miles472.3 km) southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa. Halong has tracked north-northeastward at 7 knots (8.0 mph/12.9 kph). Halong continues to create very rough seas with maximum significant wave heights at 35 feet (10.6 meters).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) forecasts Halong to track over Minami Daitō Jima by August 7. The Daitō Islands are an archipelago made up of three isolated coral islands southeast of Okinawa. The forecast track from JTWC then carries Halong to a landfall in Shikoku by August 9. Shikoku is the smallest of Japan's four main islands. It is located south of Honshū. All of these areas are under weather advisories. For more information about advisories in Japan, visit the Japan Meteorological Agency's website at: http://www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-206][image-222]Aug. 05, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees a Somewhat Lopsided Typhoon Halong

Infrared satellite imagery from NASA shows bands of powerful thunderstorms around Typhoon Halong's center, southern and eastern quadrants, while the northern quadrant is lacking in them. Typhoon Halong appears somewhat lopsided on satellite imagery because thunderstorm development in the northern side of the storm is being inhibited.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Typhoon Halong on Aug. 4 at 12:47 a.m. EDT, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard provided infrared data on the cloud top temperatures of Typhoon Halong. AIRS data showed powerful thunderstorms with the highest, coldest cloud tops circled the center of the storm and were in two thick bands in the southern and eastern quadrants of the storm. Cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C indicating they were nearing the top of the troposphere. NASA research has shown that cloud top temperatures that cold, from storms that high, have the potential to produce heavy rainfall.

The other thing that the infrared imagery showed was a degradation of strong convection and thunderstorm development in the northern half of the storm. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that development is being inhibited because of subsidence, that is, the sinking of air (from above). In order for thunderstorms to form, air needs to rise and condense into clouds. When air is sinking from overhead, it prevents cloud formation from happening.

On Aug. 5 at 02:15 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Halong in the western Pacific Ocean that showed the strongest bands of thunderstorms continued to be in the southern and eastern quadrants of the storm.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Halong's center was located near 21.4 north latitude and 130.1 east longitude, about 351 nautical miles (403.9 miles/ 650.1 km) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa. Maximum sustained winds were near 85 knots (97.8 mph/157.4 kph). Halong continues to generate extremely rough seas with maximum significant wave heights at 35 feet (10.6 meters).

JTWC forecasters expect Halong to continue moving north-northeast over the next day or two before taking a more northerly track toward mainland Japan.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-174][image-190]Aug. 04, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Halong's Eye Wink

As Super Typhoon Halong tracks north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites have seen the powerful storm appear to wink at space as it developed and "opened" an eye and then close its eye as clouds moved over it. That wink appears to be a sign of eyewall replacement in the powerful storm.

On August 2 at 01:45 UTC (August 1 at 9:45 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of a wide-eyed Super Typhoon Halong moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. At the time of the image, Halong was a powerful Category 5 Super Typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Satellite data showed that Halong had a 10-nautical mile (11.5 mile/18.5 km) wide eye.

On August 4 at 04:40 UTC (12:40 a.m. EDT), NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Super Typhoon Halong that showed its eye had become cloud filled. The image also showed that the bulk of strongest bands of thunderstorms were over the southern quadrant of the storm.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that microwave satellite imagery suggests an on-going eyewall replacement. That's when the thunderstorms that circle the eye of a powerful hurricane are replaced by other thunderstorms. Basically, a new eye begins to develop around the old eye. Many intense hurricanes undergo at least one of these eyewall replacements during their existence. JTWC noted that the eyewall replacement correlates to the recent weakening trend.

On Monday, August 4, Super Typhoon Halong's maximum sustained winds had dropped to near 105 knots (120.8 mph/190.4 kph), making it a Category Two hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. On August 3, Halong was a Super Typhoon with maximum sustained winds near 130 knots (149.6 mph/240.8 kph) on August 3, which made it a Category Four storm.

On August 4, Halong was centered near 17.3 north and 130.3 east, about 588 nautical miles (676.7 miles/1,089 km) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Halong was moving northwest at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph). Because Halong is such a powerful storm, it is generating extremely rough seas. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that wave heights were near 42 feet (12.8 meters).

The JTWC expects Halong to continue moving in a northerly direction for the next couple of days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 


[image-170]Aug. 01, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Halong's "Best Side"

NASA satellite data showed Tropical Storm Halong's "best side" or most powerful side was east of its center. That's where the coldest cloud top temperatures and strongest thunderstorms appeared on satellite imagery.

On August 1 at 13:30 UTC (9:30 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared picture of Tropical Storm Halong. The infrared data showed the coldest, strongest thunderstorm cloud-top temperatures east of the center of circulation. Cloud tops were as cold as -80F/-62C. Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate thunderstorm cloud tops are near the top of the troposphere, and have the potential to drop very heavy rainfall.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical Storm Halong had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots (69.0 mph/111.1 kph). It was centered near 14.9 north latitude and 137.9 east longitude, about 324 nautical miles (600 miles/372.9 km) north of Yap. It was moving to the west-northwest at 7 knots (8.0 mph/12.9 kph).

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Halong to continue intensifying for the next three days before it begins a weakening trend. Halong is expected to pass near Okinawa sometime on August 6. For forecast updates from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, visit:  http://www.usno.navy.mil/JTWC/

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36][image-142][image-158]July 31, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Halong Move Northwest Of Guam

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite passed over Guam as heavy rain fell over the island while Tropical Storm Halong's center passed just to the north of the island.

The TRMM satellite flew above tropical storm Halong on July 31, 2014 at 0904 UTC (August 1, 2014 at 7:04 p.m. local time, Guam).

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland TRMM data was used to create a rainfall analysis. The analysis derived TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data was overlaid on a visible/infrared image from Japan's MTSAT-2 satellite at 0900 UTC to provide an entire picture of the storm and its rainfall distribution. TRMM PR revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 85.6 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour in bands wrapping around Halong's southeastern side.

A simulated 3-D view of Halong (from the northwest) was produced at NASA Goddard using radar reflectivity data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The image showed a slice near the southern edge of the tropical storm's center found thunderstorms reaching heights of over 16.7 km (about 10.4 miles). The release of energy within these intense thunderstorm towers often portends a tropical cyclone's intensification.

On July 30 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Halong had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kph). It was centered near 14.9 north latitude and 140.3 east longitude, about 266 nautical miles (306.1 miles/492.8 km) west-northwest of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Halong was moving to the west at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph). Halong was generating very rough surf with seas up to 22 feet (6.7 meters).  

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center is forecasting Halong to continue moving to the west-northwest and to intensify. 

Text credit:  Hal Pierce/Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 


[image-94][image-110]July 30, 2014 - NASA Catches Two Tropical Troublemakers in Northwestern Pacific: Halong and 96W

There are two tropical low pressure areas in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean today and they're close enough to each other to be captured in one image generated from data gathered by NASA's Aqua satellite.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over both Tropical Storm Halong and developing System 96W early on July 30 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured infrared data on them in one image. Both systems show powerful thunderstorms stretching high into the troposphere with cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C. Those thunderstorms have the potential for heavy rainfall.

The latest update from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) places the center of the storm about 75 nautical miles (86.3 miles/138.9 km) northwest of Navsta, Guam, near 14.4 north latitude and 143.4 east longitude. Halong's maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots (57.4 mph/92.6 kph). The JTWC expects Halong to strengthen to typhoon status by August 1. Halong was moving to the west at 8 knots (9.2 mph/14.8 kph).

Halong is moving through the Marianas Islands and has generated a Tropical Storm Warning for Guam and a Typhoon Warning for Rota.

To the west of Tropical Storm Halong lies the developing tropical low known as System 96W. Enhanced infrared satellite imagery on July 30 showed that System 96W appeared to be more organized.

System 96W is now located near 19.9 north latitude and 130.5 east longitude, about 416 nautical miles south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) described System 96W as a monsoon depression with improved deep convection begins to consolidate as a typical tropical cyclone. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated between 20 to 25 knots (23.0 to 28.7 mph / 37.0 to 46.3 kph. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 996 millibars.

The JTWC gives System 96W a high chance of becoming the Northwestern Pacific's next tropical depression in the next 24 hours.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]July 29, 2014 - NASA Sees Developing Tropical Storm Halong Causing Warnings

NASA infrared satellite data revealed that Tropical Storm Halong is surrounded by strong thunderstorms and an eye appears to be developing.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Halong on July 29 at   03:29 UTC (July 28 at 11:29 p.m. EDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument captured data on the cloud cover. The infrared data showed very cold, high thunderstorm cloud top temperatures of powerful storms surrounding the center, with what appears to be an eye developing. Microwave satellite data also shows a small eye, with tightly-curved bands of thunderstorms wrapping into it.

A warning is in force for Rota and a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Guam, while a typhoon watch is also in effect got Guam. 

On July 29 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Halong's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots (63.2 mph/101.9 kph). Halong was centered near 13.7 north latitude, approximately 134 nautical miles (154 miles/248 km) east of Andersen Air Force Base. Halong has tracked northwestward at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast indicates that Halong will move to the west-northwest through the Marianas Islands while continuing to intensify.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]July 28, 2014 - New Tropical Depression Forms in Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Tropical Depression 11W has formed in the Northwestern Pacific and is expected to track through the Marianas Islands.

Infrared satellite imagery created at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 28 at 15:32 UTC (11:31 a.m. EDT) shows the storm somewhat elongated from northeast to southwest. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted just 30 minutes before the satellite image that Tropical Depression 11W had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). It was located about 304 nautical miles (349.8 miles/563 km) east-southeast of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. That puts its center near 12.0 north latitude and 149.8 east longitude. It was moving to the west-northwest at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

11W is expected to move west-northwest through the Marianas Islands, over the next couple of days. The forecasters at the JTWC expect 11W to pass to the northeast of Guam on July 30.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

TRMM image of Halong
On July 31, NASA's TRMM Satellite showed rain was falling at a rate of over 85.6 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour in bands wrapping around Halong's southeastern side.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Aqua image of Halong
Aqua captured this visible image of Halong on August 6 at 12:30 a.m. EDT as powerful bands of thunderstorms swirled into the center from the northwestern quadrant.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Halong
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Halong on August 8, 2014 at 04:15 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Halong over Japan
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Typhoon Halong on August 9, 2014 at 01:50 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Halong directly over Japan
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Halong directly over Japan on August 10, 2014 at 04:10 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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GOES-West image of the trio of storms in the Pacific
This GOES-West image shows the trio of storms terrorizing the Pacific. Julio and the remnants of Iselle are near Hawaii and the Halong can be seen far left as it approaches Japan in this August 10 at 13:30 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA NOAA GOES Project
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Halong from the ISS
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NASA ISS
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Tropical Depression 11W
This infrared satellite image from July 28 at 15:32 UTC (11:31 a.m. EDT) shows the Tropical Depression 11W somewhat elongated from northeast to southwest. Credit: UWM
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UWM
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AIRS image of Halong
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Halong on July 29 at 03:29 UTC infrared data showed very cold thunderstorm cloud top temperatures of surrounding the center and developing eye.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL
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Halong with tagalong system 96W
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over both developing System 96W (left) and Tropical Storm Halong (right) on July 30 and had powerful thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F/-52C.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Aqua image of Halong
This "head-on" image of Tropical Storm Halong from NASA's Aqua satellite on July 29 at 11:47 a.m. EDT shows the circular shape of the storm and strongest thunderstorms (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM 3-D image of Halong
On July 31, NASA's TRMM Satellite showed rain was falling at a rate of over 85.6 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour in bands wrapping around Halong's southeastern side. Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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NASA's TRMM Satellite 3-D Flyby of Tropical Storm Halong On July 31, NASA's TRMM Satellite showed rain was falling at a rate of over 85.6 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour in bands wrapping around Halong's southeastern side. Halong was dropping heavy rain over Guam as it passed by.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Terra infrared image of Halong
On August 1 at 9:30 a.m. ED, NASA's Terra satellite captured this infrared picture of Tropical Storm Halong. Strongest storms and coldest cloud tops as cold as -80F/-62C (yellow) east of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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MODIS image of Halong
On August 4 at 12:40 a.m. EDT NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Halong and its cloud-filled eye as it continued tracking north toward Japan.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Halong
On August 2 at 01:45 UTC NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of a wide-eyed Typhoon Halong moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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MODIS image of Halong
On Aug. 5 at 02:15 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Halong in the western Pacific Ocean.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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AIRS image of Halong
On Aug. 4 at 12:47 a.m. EDT, the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on the cloud top temperatures of Typhoon Halong. Purple indicates highest, coldest, strongest thunderstorms.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Halong
NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Typhoon Halong on August 5 and revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 87 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour south of the Halong's eye.
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SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Typhoon Halong on August 5 and revealed that rain was falling at a rate of over 87 mm (about 3.4 inches) per hour south of the Halong's eye.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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MODIS Image of Halong
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Halong on August 7 at 02:35 UTC, as it continued approaching southern Japan.
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NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Page Last Updated: August 12th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner