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Rammasun (was 09W - Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
July 22, 2014

[image-254][image-270][image-286]NASA's TRMM Satellite Measures Up Super Typhoon Rammasun 

NASA's TRMM satellite measured up Super Typhoon Rammasun's rainfall rates, rainfall totals and cloud heights providing a look at the inner workings and aftermath of the storm.

Super Typhoon Rammasun struck the southern coast of China on Friday, July 18 as a very powerful super typhoon with sustained winds estimated at 135 knots (~155 mph or equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane on the US Saffir-Simpson scale), making it the strongest typhoon to hit the area in several decades.

Rammasun made landfall at 3:30 p.m. (local time) on Hainan Island where the southern half of the intense eye wall raked across the northeast tip of that island. The center then quickly cut across the Qiongzhou Strait separating Hainan from the Leizhou Peninsula to the north. The right half of the storm then impacted the southern part of Leizhou Peninsula, which is located in the southwest corner of Guangdong province. Rammasun re-emerged over the Gulf of Tonkin slightly weaker before making its final landfall in China on the coast of Guangxi province near the border with Vietnam.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite, which has been collecting data and recording images of tropical cyclones over the global tropics for an astounding 17 years now, captured this first image of Rammasun, which is Siamese for 'thunder god,' just after it had made its final landfall on the coast of mainland China near Vietnam.

At 01:59 UTC (8:59 a.m. local time) on July 19, TRMM captured an image of the horizontal distribution of rainfall throughout Rammasun.  Rain rates in the center of the satellite's path were gathered from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument while those in the outer swath were measured by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TRMM showed extremely heavy rain rates (near the storm's center) on the order of 100 mm (~4 inches) per hour along the China/Vietnam border. Strong rain bands (indicating moderate and heavy areas of rain respectively) wrapped around the storm, indicating the storm maintained a powerful cyclonic circulation.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, visualizers took the TRMM satellite data and created a 3-D view of Rammasun looking west. The 3-D image showed the highest, more intense thunderstorms within Rammasun. There were some thunderstorms that reached as high as 9.3 miles (15 kilometers) and many surrounded the eyewall. 

In addition to creating the horizontal and 3-D image of tropical cyclones at NASA Goddard, TRMM data is used in an analysis with other satellites to create an overall look at rainfall coverage.

The TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation data (TMPA) analysis uses TRMM to calibrate rainfall estimates from other satellites to expand the rainfall coverage of the TRMM satellite. TMPA rainfall estimates for the period from July 14 to 21, 2014 showed a swath of heavy rain associated with the passage from extending from just west of the Philippines across the South China Sea and into southern China. Rainfall totals on the order of 225mm (~9 inches) or more covered much of Hainan Island and the southern Leizhou Peninsula with upwards of 325 mm (~13 inches) over the south China coast adjacent to Vietnam where Rammasun made its final landfall.

Text credit:  Steve Lang
SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 


[image-238]Typhoon Rammasun Made Final Landfall Near China and Vietnam Border

Typhoon Rammasun made landfall in southern China on July 19 bringing heavy rain and typhoon-strength winds to the south China/Vietnam border. NASA and NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an infrared image the typhoon that showed strong thunderstorms with heavy rain potential.

Rammasun made landfall in southern China just north of the Vietnam border on July 18 at 8 p.m. EDT (July 19 at 0000 UTC). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center placed Rammasun's center near 21.9 north and 108.1 east, about 134 nautical miles (154.2 miles/248.2 km) east-northeast of Hanoi, Vietnam. Maximum sustained winds were still near 100 knots (115.1. mph/185.2 kph) at the time of landfall. Rammasun was moving to the northwest at 15 knots (177.2 mph/27.7 kph) and was expected to dissipate over land in the next couple of days. 

The China Meteorological Agency issued a red alert warning as Rammasun approached landfall on Saturday, July 19. A red alert is the highest level of warning.

When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Rammasun on July 19 at 18:25 UTC (2:25 p.m. EDT) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured an infrared image of the storm. The VIIRS instrument showed three areas of powerful thunderstorms wrapping into the low-level center of circulation. Two of those areas were along the Vietnam/China border and the other was over southwestern China, over Yun County, Yunnan, China, just north of the Laos border.

VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. VIIRS flies aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, which is managed by both NASA and NOAA.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-206][image-222]July 18, 2014 - NASA Sees Supertyphoon Rammasun Eyeing Landfall

Imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite captured a wide-eyed Typhoon Rammasun as it was making landfall in northern Hainan Island, China early on July 18. A rainfall analysis using another NASA satellite showed the flooding potential of the storm as it left the Philippines and headed for China. Now, Rammasun is headed for a final landfall near the northeastern border of Vietnam and China.

On July 17, an analysis of Typhoon Rammasun's rainfall was conducted at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The rainfall analysis covered the storm's rainfall from July 10 to 17. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM-calibrated merged global Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) indicated that rainfall totals of over 325 mm (about 12.8 inches) occurred in many parts of the central Philippines as Rammasun swept through.

Typhoon Rammasun passed to the south of the Philippine Capitol of Manila. Rainfall totals there were estimated to be greater than 200 mm (about 7.9 inches). Most of the Philippines were affected by Rammasun but northern Luzon and Mindanao received lower amounts of rainfall than locations closer to the typhoon's track. The highest rainfall totals of over 545 mm (about 21.5 inches) were found in the South China Sea southwest of Manila.

On July 18 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Rammasun just as the eye of the storm was approaching Hainan Island, China. The MODIS instrument aboard Aqua captured an image of the storm that showed a clear eye, surrounded by bands of thunderstorms that extended into southern China's mainland, west into the Gulf of Tonkin, blanketing Hainan Island, and over the South China Sea.

On July 18 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Rammasun had moved back over water in the Gulf of Tonkin and had strengthened back into a super typhoon. The Gulf of Tonkin is the body of water associated with the South China Sea that lies between Hainan Island, China and Vietnam.

At that time, Rammasun's maximum sustained winds had increased back to 135 knots (155 mph/250 kph) making it a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson sc. Rammasun was centered near 20.2 north and 110.8 east, about 217 nautical miles (249.7 miles/401.9 km) southwest of Hong Kong. It was moving to the northwest at 12 knots (13.8 mph/22.2 kph) and generating very high waves in the Gulf. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) estimates 35-foot (10.6 meter) high seas. Hong Kong was still under Strong Wind Signal #3.

JTWC forecasters noted that animated multispectral and enhanced Infrared satellite imagery showed Rammasun's eye had become more organized, and cloud top temperatures cooled. Cooler cloud top temperatures indicate more uplift in a storm, pushing the clouds higher into the troposphere. 

Warnings are in effect for northeastern Vietnam, and can be found at the Vietnam Meteorological website: http://www.nchmf.gov.vn/Web/vi-VN/104/23/22207/Default.aspx

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Rammasun's final landfall just north of the China/Vietnam border around July 19 at 0000 UTC.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-174][image-190]NASA's TRMM Satellite Adds Up Typhoon Rammasun's Philippines Deluge

Typhoon Rammasun dropped large amounts of rainfall over the Philippines, and the TRMM satellite was used to measure it from space. Rammasun is now making its way toward Hainan Island, China.

NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency partner on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite. As TRMM orbits the Earth it has the ability to calculate rainfall occurring in storms and a rainfall analysis using TRMM and other data helps scientists calculate total rainfall.

A preliminary analysis of rainfall during the period when typhoon Rammasun was moving over the Philippines. The analysis is the result of a TRMM-calibrated merged global Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) performed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland These TMPA rainfall total estimates were for the period from July 9-16, 2014. The analysis indicated that rainfall totals of over 325 mm (about 12.8 inches) were located over many parts of the Philippines. The analysis also showed that northern Luzon had received lower amounts of rainfall than the central Philippines.

Typhoon Rammasun known locally as "Glenda" is the most powerful typhoon to hit the Philippines this year. As of today, At least ten deaths have been attributed to Rammasun. Typhoon Rammasun's track was north of Super Typhoon Haiyan's path of destruction through the Philippines in November 2013.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rammasun on July 16 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard captured infrared data that showed powerful thunderstorms continued to circle the storm's center. Cloud top temperatures around the center of circulation were colder than -63 F/-52C indicating cloud tops were near the top of the troposphere and there was strong uplift in the storm. Cloud top temperatures that high indicate strong storms with the potential for heavy rainfall, according to previous NASA studies.

On July 17 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Rammasun's maximum sustained winds were near 75 knots (86.3 mph/138.9 kph). It was located near 17.2 north latitude and 114.5 east longitude, about 333 nautical miles (383.2 miles/ 616.7 km) south of Hong Kong, China.  The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expects the storm to strengthen slightly over the next day.  The China Meteorological Agency (CMA) issued an orange warning for Hainan Island and the mainland. CMA forecasters expect that Rammasun will approach the coastal area of eastern Hainan to western Guangxi and will make landfall on Lingshui of Hainan Island at 0600 UTC (2 a.m. EDT) on the morning of July 18 before heading toward Vietnam.  The JTWC expects a second and final landfall near the northeastern border of Vietnam and China on July 19.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro / Hal Pierce
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-110][image-160]July 16, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Rammasun Exit the Philippines

Typhoon Rammasun passed through the central Philippines overnight and NASA satellite imagery showed that the storm's center moved into the South China Sea. NASA's TRMM satellite showed the soaking rains that Rammasun brought to the Philippines as it tracked from east to west.

Before Rammasun made landfall, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over the storm and measured cloud heights and rainfall rates. On July 14, 2014 at 18:19 UTC (2:19 p.m. EDT), TRMM spotted powerful, high thunderstorms reaching heights of almost 17km (10.5 miles). Rain was measured falling at a rate of almost 102 mm (about 4 inches) per hour and that heavy rainfall continued as Rammasun made landfall in the central Philippines.

Rammasun made landfall near Legazpi City on July 15. Legazpi is the capital city of the province of Albay in the Philippines, located on the east coast.

On July 16, 2014 at 02:40 UTC (July 15 at 10:40 p.m. EDT) Typhoon Rammasun had already crossed the Philippines and entered the South China Sea when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument provides high-resolution imagery and captured Rammasun after it moved west of Manila. The eye of the typhoon had become obscured by clouds and was not apparent in the MODIS image. The typhoon also appeared somewhat elongated in a west-to-east direction.

On July 16 at 09:00 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Rammasun's maximum sustained winds were near 80 knots (92.0 mph/148.2 kph). The center was in the South China Sea, near 15.4 north latitude and 118.5 east longitude. It was about 114 nautical miles west-northwest of Manila and was moving to the northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Rammasun to strengthen to 105 knots (120.8 mph/194.5 kph) by July 18 before weakening again.

Typhoon Rammasun is expected to pass north of Hainan Island, China on July 18 around 0600 UTC (2 a.m. EDT). As a result, China Meteorological Administration (CMA) noted that Typhoon standby signal No 1 is expected to be raised today, July 16 as Typhoon Rammasun is expected to pass within about 500 miles (~ 800 kilometers) from Hong Kong. For current watches and warnings from CMA, visit: http://www.cma.gov.cn/en/WeatherWarnings/ActiveWarnings/201407/t20140716_252541.html.

The CMA expects Rammasun to approach the coastal area of eastern Hainan Island to western Guangxi on the mainland. Rammasun is forecast to make its next landfall at Lingshui, Hainan Island, and then in Yangjiang of the Guangdong Province of mainland China, early (local time) on July 18.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36][image-126][image-142]July 15, 2014 - NASA Sees Typhoon Rammasun's Eye Staring at Visayas, Philippines

Early on July 15, Typhoon Rammasun began making landfall in the eastern part of the central Philippines and NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites spotted the 20 nautical-mile-wide (23 mile/37 km) eye of the storm close to landfall.

Typhoon Rammasun was making landfall in the Visayas region. Visayas is located in the central Philippines.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Rammasun on Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at 04:10 UTC (12:10 a.m. EDT) and measured rainfall occurring throughout the storm. TRMM found moderate rainfall (about 35 mm)/1.4 inches per hour) around the center of circulation and moderate to heavy rainfall (50 mm/2 inches per hour) over the central and northern Philippines in the western quadrant of Rammasun.

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Rammasun on July 15 at 05:00 UTC (1 a.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument known as MODIS took a visible image of the storm. The MODIS image showed Rammasun's eye just east of the Visayas region. Rammasun's clouds stretched over the entire country and west into the South China Sea.

Another instrument aboard Aqua took an infrared picture of Rammasun's cloud top temperatures. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder gathered temperature data that showed cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C over the northern and central Philippines and in a band of thunderstorms southeast of the center of circulation over the Philippine Sea. Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate cloud tops high into the troposphere with the potential to produce heavy rainfall. That heavy rainfall was confirmed by NASA's TRMM satellite measurement just 49 minutes earlier when that satellite passed over the Philippines.

On July 15 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Rammasun's maximum sustained winds were near 100 knots (115.1 mph/185.2 kph). At that time the center of the storm was closing in on the island of Sorsogon, Philippines. It was centered near 13.2 north latitude and 124.1 east longitude, also about 236 nautical miles (271.6 miles/437.1 km) southeast of Manila. Rammasun is moving to the northwest at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph) and is forecast to pass close to Manila early on July 16 (UTC).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasters expect Rammasun to weaken moving over the Philippines and then re-intensify after re-emerging over the South China Sea because of the warm sea surface temperatures there. Rammasun is expected to be a typhoon when it makes a second landfall over northern Hainan Island, China on July 18 before a final landfall in northern Vietnam.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94]July 14, 2014 - Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Typhoon Rammasun Approaching Philippines

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite passed over Typhoon Rammasun early on July 14 and captured a visible image of the storm that showed large bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center as it approached the central Philippines.

When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Rammasun on July 14 at 04:20 UTC, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard took a visible image of the storm. The VIIRS instrument showed large, thick bands of powerful thunderstorms wrapping into the low-level center of circulation. The largest band extended from the western to southern and around to the eastern quadrants of the storm before spiraling into the center. Powerful thunderstorms also surrounded the tightly wound eye.

VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. VIIRS flies aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, which is managed by both NASA and NOAA.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted on July 14 that Rammasun had slowed in forward movement and continued to consolidate as convection (rising air that forms the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) has further strengthened and the storm has developed an irregular eye about 15 nautical miles wide. Microwave satellite imagery showed the storm had strengthened as the eyewall (the powerful thunderstorms around the open eye) became more developed.

On July 14 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Rammasun had maximum sustained winds near 75 knots. Rammasun was moving to the west-southwestward at 10 knots. It was centered near 12.7 north latitude and 127.6 east longitude, about 435 nautical miles southeast of Manila, and closing in on the central Visayas region of the Philippines.  

Typhoon Rammasun is expected to make landfall in the eastern Visayas region of the Philippines around July 15 at 0000 UTC (July 14 at 8 p.m. EDT). On July 13, Public storm warning signal #1 was in force in the following Luzon provinces: Camarines Norte & Sur, Catanduanes, Albay and Sorsogon, and Public storm warning signal #1 was in force in the Visayas province of Northern Samar. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Rammasun to move across the central and northern Philippines in a northwesterly direction crossing near Manila around July 16 at 0000 UTC (July 15 at 8 p.m. EDT), then moving into the South China Sea for another landfall in mainland China, just north of Hainan Island late on July 18 as a typhoon.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]July 11, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Nine Over Guam

Guam and surrounding areas were under a Tropical Storm Warning and Watch on July 11 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. During the early morning hours on July 11, Tropical Depression 09W strengthened into a tropical storm.

On July 11 at 03:45 UTC (1:45 p.m. EDT Guam local time/), the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm 09W (09W) over Guam. The MODIS image showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms around the center of circulation, and in a large band circling around the western quadrant and spiraling into the center.

On July 11, a tropical storm warning was in effect for Guam, Rota and surrounding waters out to 40 nautical miles. A tropical storm watch continued for Tinian, Saipan and surrounding waters out to 40 nautical miles. On July 11, the Governor of Guam declared Tropical Storm Condition 1 as of 8 p.m. CHST (local time).

At 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT/10 p.m. CHST-Guam local time) Tropical Storm 09W's maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph and the National Weather Service expect winds to increase over the weekend of July 12-13. For updated forecasts, including warnings and watches, visit the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Tiyan, Guam website: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/pr/guam/.

The center of Tropical Storm 09w was located by satellite near latitude 13.0 north and longitude 146.1 east. That puts the center of 09W about 165 miles east-southeast of Guam, 155 miles southeast of Rota, and 185 miles south-southeast of Tinian and Saipan.

Tropical Storm 09W is moving west-northwest at 14 mph and is expected to be very near Guam early on July 12 (local time). The U.S. National Weather Service forecast office in Guam expects that general motion is expected to continue through July 12 before 09W turns gradually westward. 09W will likely be renamed "Rammasun" from the World Meteorological Organization's Western North Pacific and the South China Sea Names list.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast calls for 09W to strengthen into a typhoon after passing Guam and continue on a westerly track, approaching the northern Philippines around July 16.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]July 10, 2014 - NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Satellite Sees Power Within Newborn Tropical Depression 09W

As the Northwestern Pacific is bidding goodbye to Tropical Cyclone Neoguri, another tropical depression has formed. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression 09W (TD09W) and captured infrared data on the storm indicating some powerful thunderstorms within.

Because TD09W is close to land areas, watches are already in effect. On July 10, a tropical storm watch is in force for Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan.

Tropical depression 09W was formerly known as low pressure System 92W. VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite taken July 10 at 14:48 UTC showed cold cloud top temperatures in newborn Tropical Depression 09W.   

An infrared image from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite taken July 10 at 14:48 UTC (10:48 a.m. EDT) showed cold cloud top temperatures in newborn Tropical Depression 09W. VIIRS saw extremely cold cloud top temperatures near -80C (-112F). Temperatures that cold in Tropical Depression 09W are indicative of thunderstorms reaching high in the troposphere, and they are capable of producing heavy rain. 

VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. VIIRS flies aboard the Suomi NPP satellite, which is managed by both NASA and NOAA.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EDT) on July 10, Tropical Depression 09W had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots. It was located near 10.8 north latitude and 150.5 east longitude, about 372 nautical miles east-southeast of Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. TD09W was moving to the northwest at 15 knots.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects TD09W to move past the southern islands of the Marianas and gradually strengthen into a typhoon.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

MODIS image of Rammasun
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Rammasun over the Philippines on July 15 at 05:00 UTC (1 a.m. EDT). The storm's eye was just east of Visayas.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response, Jeff Schmaltz
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Suomi NPP image of 09W
This infrared image from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite taken July 10 at 14:48 UTC showed very cold cloud top temperatures in newborn Tropical Depression 09W.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA
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Tropical Storm 09W
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Depression 09W over Guam on July 11 at 03:45 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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Rammasun seen by Suomi NPP
The VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Rammasun on July 14 at 04:20 UTC.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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MODIS image of Rammasun
On July 16, 2014 at 02:40 Typhoon Rammasun had already crossed the Philippines and entered the South China Sea as NASA's TRMM satellite passed overhead and captured this image.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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TRMM image of Rammasun
TRMM satellite passed over Rammasun on July 15 at 12:10 a.m. EDT and found moderate rainfall (35 mm/1.4 in/hr) around the center and moderate to heavy rainfall (50 mm/2 in/hr) over the central and northern Philippines.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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AIRS image of Rammasun
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of powerful thunderstorms (purple) from Rammasun over the Philippines on July 15 at 04:59 UTC (12:59 a.m. EDT)
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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NASA's TRMM satellite flew over on July 14, 2014 at 1819 UTC and data was used to make this 3-D flyby showing thunderstorms to heights of almost 17km (10.5 miles). Rain was measured falling at a rate of almost 102 mm (about 4 inches).
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA Hal Pierce
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TRMM Image of Rammasun
TRMM data showed that rainfall totals of over 325 mm (about 12.8 inches) were located over many parts of the Philippines.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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AIRS image of Rammasun
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Rammasun on July 16 and the AIRS instrument aboard captured infrared data that showed powerful thunderstorms (purple) continued to circle the storm's center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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MODIS image of Rammasun
On July 18 at 05:35 UTC (1:35 a.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Typhoon Rammasun approaching Hainan Island, China.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team.
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TRMM Image of Rammasun
Near Manila, Philippines, rainfall totals there were estimated to be greater than 200 mm (7.9 inches). Highest rainfall totals of over 545 mm (21.5 inches) in the South China Sea southwest of Manila.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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VIIRS image of Rammasun
An infrared image on July 19 from the VIIRS instrument aboard NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite shows two areas of strong thunderstorms (red) in two areas near the Vietnam/China border.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NOAA/NASA
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TRMM image of Rammasun
This TRMM rainfall image from July 19 at 8:59 a.m. local time and shows extremely heavy rain rates on the order of 100 mm/4 inches per hour (light pink) along the China/Vietnam border.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM 3-D image of Rammasun
In this 3-D view of Rammasun, areas highlighted in red indicate strongest, highest thunderstorms with intense convection (rising air) such as those surrounding the eyewall.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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TRMM rainfall map of Hainan Island
This rainfall map from July 14 to 21 indicates 225mm/~9in (brown) or more cover much of Hainan Island and the southern Leizhou Peninsula. About 325 mm/13 in (dark red) fell over the south China coast adjacent to Vietnam.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: July 22nd, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner