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Peipah (was 05W - Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
April 15, 2014

[image-174]Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah Still Raining on Philippines

Several regions in the south and central Philippines have flood advisories as the remnants of now dissipated Tropical Depression Peipah continue to linger over the country. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at the remnant clouds from its orbit in space on April 15.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a look at Peipah's remnant clouds on April 15 at 5:44 a.m. EDT. VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. The VIIRS image showed scattered thunderstorms and clouds over the central and southern Philippines. 

On April 15 in the Central and Western Visayas region, and the Bicol and Mimaropa regions of the Philippines a general flood advisory was in effect. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) expects scattered light to occasionally moderate rain showers and thunderstorms throughout those regions today, April 15.

A general flood advisory is also in effect for Eastern Visayas, where PAGASA expects moderate to occasional heavy rain and thunderstorms from Peipah's remnants. In the Zamboanga peninsula of the Mindanao Region, PAGASA is calling for cloudy skies with moderate rains and thunderstorms.

Peipah's last observed center of circulation was near 10.4 north and 126.9 east, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Peipah has dissipated and is no longer suspect for re-development over the next 24 hours.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-158]Apr. 14, 2014 - NASA Sees Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah Over Southern Philippines

Tropical Depression Peipah has been very stubborn and has moved over the southern and central Philippines bringing clouds, showers and gusty winds. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image that showed Peipah's clouds covering the Visayas and Mindanao regions of the country.

The VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible look at the remnant clouds associated with former Tropical Depression Peipah on April 14 at 4:24 UTC/12:24 a.m. EDT. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans. Peipah is a broad area of low pressure and its remnant clouds covered the central region of the Philippines called the Visayas region, and Mindanao, the southern region.  Microwave satellite imagery confirmed that the low-level part of the storm is still poorly defined and convection (rising air that builds thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) has not improved.

On April 14 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Peipah's remnants were centered near 9.7 north latitude and 130.8 east longitude, about 360 nautical miles/414 miles/666.7 km northwest of Zamboanga, Philippines. Maximum sustained winds were estimated as high as 20 knots/23.0 mph/37.2 kph.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Peipah's remnants have a medium chance for regenerating in the next couple of days as it moves slowly in a westerly direction.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-142]Apr. 10, 2014 - NASA's TRMM Satellite Catches Tropical Depression Peipah's Dying Breath

Tropical Depression Peipah showed some last-life signs of strength with areas of heavy rainfall on April 10 as it was dissipating in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA and JAXA's TRMM satellite passed over Peipah and caught its "dying breath" of a burst of heavy rain as it encountered adverse environmental conditions.

When the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over Peipah, the Precipitation Radar instrument looked at the rate in which rain was falling throughout the storm.  TRMM found that the heaviest rain was falling at 1 inch/25 mm per hour, a sign that there's strength in the storm's center. TRMM is managed by both NASA and JAXA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., that TRMM rainfall data was combined with visible imagery from Japan's MTSAT-2 satellite to provide a complete picture of the depression. The imagery showed that the storm appeared more circular than it did the day before.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT on April 10, Tropical Depression Peipah (known as Domeng in the Philippines) was still east of the country. It was centered near 8.4 north and 131.8 east, about 168 nautical miles west-northwest of Koror, Palau. Increasing easterly vertical wind shear has knocked the punch out of the system and maximum sustained winds were down to 20 knots/23.0 mph/37.2 kph. 

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final warning 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT and noted that low level circulation has completely unraveled and become embedded in a tight trough (elongated area of low pressure).  The system will be monitored by JTWC for any regeneration.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-126]Apr. 09, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Depression Peipah Crawling Toward Philippines

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah on April 9 as the storm slowly approached the Philippines from the east. According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Peipah is now not expected to make landfall in eastern Visayas until April 12.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite or VIIRS instrument aboard Suomi NPP captured a visible, high-resolution image of the storm as it continued moving through the Philippine Sea. The storm appeared disorganized in the image, and the center was difficult to pinpoint on the visible imagery.

VIIRS is a scanning radiometer that collects visible and infrared imagery and radiometric measurements. VIIRS data is used to measure cloud and aerosol properties, ocean color, sea and land surface temperature, ice motion and temperature, fires, and Earth's albedo.

Using animated multispectral satellite imagery, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center observed weakening deep convection (thunderstorms were not developing as quickly) within a broad low-level circulation center. 

An image from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) showed there is a curved band of thunderstorms over the northern semi-circle. There's also a weak band of thunderstorms over the southwester quadrant of the storm. The AMSU-A instrument flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite and is a 15-channel microwave sounder instrument designed primarily to obtain temperatures in the upper atmosphere (especially the stratosphere) 

Tropical depression Peipah's maximum sustained winds were near 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph on April 8 at 1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT. Peipah is centered near 9.1 north and 129.7 east, or 616 nautical miles/709 miles/1,141 km southeast of Manila, Philippines. The depression slowed down and was moving to the north-northwest at 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph.

Peipah is in a weak steering environment, that means there are no strong high or low pressure areas nearby to push it one way or another, so it is expected to track slowly in a northwesterly direction for the next several days.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-110]Apr. 08, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Depression Peipah Approaching Philippines

As Tropical Depression Peipah continues moving toward the central Philippines, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and took an infrared look at the cloud top temperatures for clues about its strength.

On April 8 at 05:11 UTC/1:11 a.m. EDT/11 p.m. Manila local time, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument known as AIRS gathered infrared data on Tropical Depression Peipah. AIRS is one of the instruments that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The AIRS data showed thunderstorms with very cold cloud-top temperatures surrounded the center of the low-level circulation and  in a band of thunderstorms extending south to southwest of the center. AIRS data showed cloud top temperatures exceeded -63F/-52C, which indicates they are high in the troposphere and have the potential for heavy rainfall. An infrared image from the data was created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. and showed that Peipah was almost half the size of the Philippines.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT/5 p.m. Manila local time, Tropical Depression Peipah, known as Domeng in the Philippines had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 kph, so it had only intensified by 5 knots/5.7 mph/9.2 kph in the last 24 hours. However, forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Peipah to continue intensifying before making landfall in Visayas, or the central Philippines. Peipah was located near 8.0 north and 130.6 east, about 670 nautical miles/771 miles/1,241 km east-southeast of Manila, Philippines and moving to the north-northwest at 9 knots/10.3 mph/16.6 kph.

A Tropical Cyclone warning remains in effect for shipping interests in the Philippine Sea. For the shipping warnings, visit: http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/weather/shipping-forecast. PAGASA, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, noted that estimated rainfall amounts range from 5 to 15 mm per hour within the 400 km diameter of the Tropical Depression's center.

Peipah is moving slowly northwest toward the Philippines and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects landfall by April 11.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94]Tropical Cyclone Peipah Passes Palau, Philippines Prepare

Tropical Cyclone Peipah passed the island of Palau on April 5 moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as it heads for a landfall in the Philippines. Peipah was formerly known as Tropical Cyclone 05W and was renamed when it reached tropical storm-force. Since then, however, wind shear has weakened the storm to a tropical depression.

On April 5 at 2100 UTC/5 p.m. EDT, Tropical Storm 05W, renamed Peipah (and known locally in the Philippines as Domeng) was located about 262 nautical miles east-southeast of Koror. It was centered near 5.5 north and 137.8 east and moving to the west-northwest at 8 knots/9.2 mph/14.8 kph. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph.  

The VIIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an infrared image of Peipah on April 5 at 16:27 UTC/12:27 p.m. EDT. It showed strong thunderstorms west of the center of circulation as a result of moderate to strong easterly wind shear. That wind shear continued over the next two days as two other satellites saw the same effect.

By April 7 at 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT, Peipah had weakened to a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph. It was located near 6.4 north and 132.1 east, about 819 nautical miles southeast of Manila, Philippines.  Peipah was moving to the west-southwest at 15 knots/17.2 mph/27.8 kph and is expected to turn to the west-northwest making landfall in northeastern Mindanao before moving through the central or Visayas region. Mindanao is the second largest and southernmost major island in the Philippines.

Satellite imagery on April 7 continued to show that the main convection and thunderstorms were still being pushed to the west-northwest of the center as a result of vertical wind shear. An image Peipah showing clouds and rainfall was created by the Naval Research Laboratory that combines rainfall rate data from NASA's TRMM satellite with cloud imagery from Japan's MTSAT-2 satellite. The images, taken at 0544 UTC/1:44 a.m. EDT and 5:23 UTC/1:23 a.m. EDT, respectively show the clouds and showers pushed to the west-northwest of the center. The TRMM data showed that the heaviest rainfall was occurring at a rate of 1 inch/25 mm per hour northwest of the center.  

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration issued a Tropical Cyclone Warning for Shipping on April 7.

Peipah continues to move west-northwest toward the Philippines and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasters do not expect the storm to intensify much before landfall.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]Apr. 04, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Depression 05W's Bulk West of Center

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression 05W on April 4 at 07:09 UTC/3:09 a.m. EDT. The VIIRS instrument captured a visible picture of the storm, revealing most of the clouds and thunderstorms were west of the center.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery today, April 3, showed that the low-level circulation center is well-defined and that there is fragmented convective banding of thunderstorms wrapping from the north into the southwest, so most of the strongest convection and thunderstorms are on the western side of the center.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT on April 4, Tropical Depression 05W (05W) had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots/35 mph/55 kph. It was located near 3.4 north latitude and 143.7 east longitude, about 629 nautical miles/902.2 miles/1,452 km east-southeast of Koror.  The depression is moving to the west at 8 knots/10.3 mph/16.6 kph.

JTWC forecasters noted that 05W is forecast to track in a northwesterly direction through waters with high ocean heat content, so the storm is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm by April 5.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]Apr. 03, 3014 - NASA's Aqua Satellite Flies Over Newborn Tropical Depression 05W

The fifth tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone season formed far from land as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm on April 4.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over newborn Tropical Depression 05W on April 3 at 03:10 UTC/April 2 at 11:10 p.m. EDT. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible picture of the storm, revealing good circulation and strong convection and thunderstorms around the center of circulation.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted that animated multispectral satellite imagery today, April 3, showed that the low-level circulation center has been consolidating and that there is fragmented convective banding of thunderstorms around the center.

At 0900 UTC/5 a.m. EDT on April 3, Tropical Depression 05W (05W) had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots/28.7 mph/46.3 kph. It was located near 1.8 north latitude and 146.3 east longitude, about 784 nautical miles/902.2 miles/1,452 km east-southeast of Koror. According to Wikipedia, Koror Island is the most populated island in the Republic of Palau.  

The depression is moving to the west at 9 knots/10.3 mph/16.6 kph and according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, is expected to move through southern Micronesia on its way toward the Philippines. JTWC forecasters noted that 05W is forecast to track through waters with high ocean heat content, so the storm is expected to strengthen to typhoon strength by April 7.

Tropical Depression 05W was formerly known as System 95W.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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Tropical Depression 05W
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over newborn Tropical Depression 05W on April 3 at 03:10 UTC and saw the storm consolidating.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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Tropical Depression 05W
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Depression 05W on April 4 at 07:09 UTC/3:09 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA
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Tropical Cyclone Peipah
This composite TRMM and MTSAT-2 satellite image taken on April 7 shows the bulk of Peipah's clouds and showers pushed west-northwest of the storm's center. Heaviest rainfall was occurring at a rate of 1 inch/25 mm per hour (red) northwest of the center.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/JAXA
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Tropical Depression Peipah
On April 8, the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed thunderstorms with very cold cloud-top temperatures (purple) around Tropical Depression Peipah's low-level center and in a band of thunderstorms south to southwest of the center.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
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NPP image of Peipah
On April 9 at 04:10 UTC/12:10 a.m. EDT, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this image of Tropical Depression Peipah slowly approaching the eastern Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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TRMM image of Peipah
On April 10, TRMM found that the heaviest rain was falling at 1 inch/25 mm per hour (red) a sign that there's strength in the storm's center. Visible imagery of clouds were provided by Japan's MTSAT-2 satellite.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/JAXA
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Suomi NPP Image of Peipah
This visible image of Tropical Depression Peipah's remnants over the southern and central Philippines was taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on April 14 at 4:24 UTC/12:24.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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NPP image of Peipah
This visible image shows the remnant clouds from former Tropical Depression Peipah located over the central and southern Philippines. It was taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on April 15 at 5:44 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NASA/NOAA
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Page Last Updated: April 15th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner