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Nanauk (was 02A - Northern Indian Ocean/Arabian Ocean)
June 13, 2014

[image-110][image-126]NASA Sees Tropical Storm Nanauk's Soaking Swan Song

Tropical Storm Nanauk was dissipating in the Arabian Sea on Friday, June 13 as it ran into increasing vertical wind shear, dry air moving into the tropical cyclone and cooler sea surface temperatures. NASA's TRMM satellite observed the soaking rains the day before that marked Nanauk's "swan song."   

Tropical storm Nanauk formed west of India on June 10, 2014 and since then has been moving toward the northwest over the open waters of the Arabian Sea. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) satellite found that Nanauk contained powerful storms dropping rain at a rate of over 247.3 mm/ 9.7 inches per hour when viewed on June 11, 2014 at 1549 UTC (11:49 a.m. EDT).

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland an analysis of rainfall from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) were overlaid on a 1530 UTC (11:30 a.m. EDT) enhanced infrared image from the European Space Agency's METEOSAT-7 satellite. TRMM PR data were used to create a 3-D view that showed that Nanauk contained powerful towering thunderstorms that were reaching heights of up to 16.8 km (10.4 miles). 

Friday the thirteenth proved unlucky for Nanauk as environmental conditions worsened and tore the storm apart. By 09:00 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued their final warning on the tropical cyclone. At that time, maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph) and weakening quickly. The storm's last official position was at 21.3 north latitude and 64.3 east longitude, about 285 nautical miles (328 miles/528 km) southwest of Karachi, Pakistan. At that time the dissipating storm was moving to the north at 9 knots (10 mph/~17 kph).

JTWC is a joint U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force office that includes Navy, Air Force and civilian meteorologists and satellite analysts. The center, located in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, provides forecasts, advisories and warnings on tropical cyclones (the generic name for a typhoon, cyclone, hurricane, tropical storm or tropical depression).

JTWC forecasters examined the upper level of the atmosphere and noted that Nanauk was analysis in an area of strong (40-50 knot/46-57 mph/74-92 kph) northeasterly vertical wind shear that was tearing the system apart.

For more information about the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, visit:  http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/features/typhoon.html

Text credit:  Hal Pierce and Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-94]June 12, 2014 - NASA Takes Tropical Cyclone Nanuak's Temperature

Tropical Cyclone Nanauk is holding its own for now as it moves through the Arabian Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite took its cloud top temperatures to determine its health.

In terms of infrared data viewing tropical cyclones, those with the coldest cloud top temperatures indicate that a storm is the most healthy, most robust and powerful. That's because thunderstorms that have strong uplift are pushed to the top of the troposphere where temperatures are bitter cold. Infrared data, such as that collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite can tell those temperatures. If AIRS data shows that cloud top temperatures are near or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-53 Celsius), that indicates strong thunderstorms high up in the troposphere. According to research with AIRS data, thunderstorms with cloud top temperatures that high are likely to generate heavy rainfall.

So, when Aqua flew over Tropical Cyclone Nanauk on June 12 at 9:11 UTC (5:11 a.m. EDT) temperatures of the many thunderstorms that circled the center of Nanauk were that cold or colder. The AIRS image also showed a band of thunderstorms that almost completely circled the storm, with the exception of the southwestern quadrant. Nanauk also seemed to fill up the northern part of the Arabian Sea.

On June 12 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Cyclone Nanauk was located approximately 425 nautical miles (489 miles/787 km) southeast of Muscat, Oman, near 18.3 north latitude and 63.4 east longitude. Nanauk was moving to the west at 10 knots (11.5 mph/18.5 kph). Maximum sustained winds remained near 55 knots (63.2 mph/102 kph).

Nanauk faces several challenges over the next couple of days, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Three factors will weaken the system quickly: increasing vertical wind shear, dry air moving into the tropical cyclone and cooler sea surface temperatures. 

Nanauk is forecast to continue tracking west-northwestward over the next day or two before succumbing to a more hostile environment. 

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-78]June 11, 2014 - A NASA View of Tropical Cyclone Nanauk in the Arabian Sea

Tropical Cyclone 02A has consolidated and strengthened over a 24 hour period between June 10 and 11 and an image from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a more rounded tropical storm, despite wind shear.

As Tropical Cyclone 02A consolidated and strengthened into a tropical storm it was re-named Nanauk. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Nanauk on June 11 at 08:29 UTC (4:29 a.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) captured an infrared and near-infrared image of the storm. The near-infrared image provided an almost visible look at the clouds that revealed a well-rounded tropical cyclone with good circulation. The infrared image showed that the storms that surrounded the center of circulation had very cold and high cloud tops. The AIRS images were created by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery shows that a large area of strong convection and building thunderstorms has continued over the low-level circulation center. Nanauk is still being buffeted by moderate to strong easterly vertical wind shear (20 to 30 knots). The wind shear has pushed the strongest thunderstorms into the western quadrant of the storm.

By 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical cyclone Nanauk's maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots. It was centered near 17.5 north latitude and 65.8 east longitude, about 452 nautical miles east-southeast of Masirah Island. Nanauk was moving to the west-northwest at 6 knots.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Nanauk to continue strengthening for another day and a half before running into higher wind shear and dry air as it approaches the Arabian Peninsula.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-51]June 10, 2014 - NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite Spots Arabian Sea Tropical Cyclone

Tropical Cyclone 02A formed in the Arabian Sea as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible photo of the storm, spotting strongest storms south of its center.

On June 10 at 08:21 UTC (4:21 a.m. EDT), when Suomi NPP passed over 02A, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured a visible image of the storm.  VIIRS collects visible and infrared imagery and global observations of land, atmosphere, cryosphere and oceans.

In the image, Tropical Storm 02A appeared slightly elongated but satellite data shows that it is consolidating and getting better organized. In the visible image, the strongest, tallest thunderstorms (that were casting shadows on the lower thunderstorms) appeared to be south of the center of circulation. The image was created by the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.

JTWC indicated that animated enhanced infrared satellite imagery on June 10 showed a slowly-consolidating low-level circulation center with deep convective banding located primarily over the southern semi-circle.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on June 10, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC stated that 02A had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was located near 16.6 north latitude and 68.0 east longitude, about 508 nautical miles (584 miles/941 km) south of Karachi, Pakistan. 02A has tracked north-northwestward at 8 knots.

JTWC forecasters expect 02A to turn more toward west-northwest over the next couple of days. According to JTWC, 02A is expected to make hurricane status in the next couple of days before weakening on its approach to the Arabian Peninsula.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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VIIRS image of 02A
This visible image from June 10 at 5:23 a.m. EDT from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the strong thunderstorms south of the center of Tropical Storm 02A in the Arabian Sea.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Nanauk
This near infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Nanauk was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on June 11 at 08:29 UTC (4:29 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Nanauk
This infrared AIRS instrument image from June 12 at 5:11 a.m. EDT shows powerful thunderstorms around Nanauk's center (purple) and a band of thunderstorms that almost completely circling the storm with the exception of the southwestern quadrant.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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TRMM image of Nanauk
This TRMM satellite 3-D image shows that Tropical Storm Nanauk contained powerful towering thunderstorms that were reaching heights of up to 16.8 km (10.4 miles) on June 11, 2014.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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This TRMM satellite flyby animation shows that Tropical Storm Nanauk contained powerful towering thunderstorms that were reaching heights of up to 16.8 km (10.4 miles) on June 11, 2014.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce
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Page Last Updated: June 13th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner